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A 10-year follow-up study on subjective well-being and relationships to person-environment (P-E) fit and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence of older Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154920
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Monica Werngren-Elgström
Gunilla Carlsson
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Jul-Aug;49(1):e16-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Environment
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
In order to investigate how well-being and ill health is affected by the process of aging, the main aim was to investigate these self-perceived aspects of health over a 10-year period among older Swedish adults. The aim was also to study how these aspects correlated with objectively assessed functional limitations, use of mobility device, person-environment (P-E) fit (also denoted accessibility), problems in housing, and activity of daily living (ADL) dependence. Using the Swedish national population register, a baseline sample of persons aged 75-84 years was identified. Out of the 133 participants at baseline (1994), the 31 participants still available 10 years later were included. The data were collected by means of interview and observation at home visits. Overall, the participants rated their subjective well-being as high and a stable prevalence of ill-health symptoms over time was reported. Changes in subjective well-being as related to changes in functional aspects seem to mainly occur earlier in the aging process, while as time goes by these relations weaken. ADL dependence, however, is more influential in more advanced age. The results confirm the complexity of the construct of health. A main contribution is that the results shed light on the importance of taking the impact of environmental factors into consideration.
PubMed ID
18829123 View in PubMed
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Aspects of quality of life in persons with pre-lingual deafness using sign language: subjective wellbeing, ill-health symptoms, depression and insomnia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45903
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(1):13-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
Monica Werngren-Elgström
Ove Dehlin
Susanne Iwarsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Occupational Therapy, Lund University, Box 157, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden. mwe@arb.lu.se
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(1):13-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Chi-Square Distribution
Deafness - psychology
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sign Language
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study investigated health-related quality of life, expressed as subjective wellbeing and the prevalence of depressive symptoms and insomnia, among elderly pre-lingually deaf persons using sign language. Comparisons were made with elderly hearing people. Forty-five pre-lingually deaf persons, 65 years or older, took part (a response rate of 46%). Subjective wellbeing was assessed with the Gothenburg Quality of Life (GQL) instrument. Depressive symptoms were rated with the 15-item version of the geriatric depression scale (GDS), and insomnia was measured with Livingston's sleep scale. Ratings of subjective wellbeing among elderly pre-lingually deaf people were generally high. One third of the deaf persons demonstrated depressive symptoms and nearly two thirds suffered from insomnia. There was substantial correlation between insomnia, depressive symptoms and lower subjective wellbeing. The results strengthened the assumption that depressive symptoms and sleep disturbance are more frequent among elderly pre-lingually deaf people using sign language than among hearing people. On the other hand, and contrary to our expectations, this did not imply significantly lower perceived subjective wellbeing compared with hearing elderly people. Results must be interpreted with caution due to limitations in the study.
PubMed ID
12849069 View in PubMed
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