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Both genetic and dietary factors underlie individual differences in DNA damage levels and DNA repair capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258288
Source
DNA Repair (Amst). 2014 Apr;16:66-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Jana Slyskova
Yolanda Lorenzo
Anette Karlsen
Monica H Carlsen
Vendula Novosadova
Rune Blomhoff
Pavel Vodicka
Andrew R Collins
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine ASCR, Prague, Czech Republic; Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. Electronic address: j.slyskova@gmail.com.
Source
DNA Repair (Amst). 2014 Apr;16:66-73
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - metabolism
DNA Damage - genetics
DNA Repair
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Endonucleases - genetics - metabolism
Female
Food Habits
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic markers
Genetic Variation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nuclear Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sex Factors
Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
The interplay between dietary habits and individual genetic make-up is assumed to influence risk of cancer, via modulation of DNA integrity. Our aim was to characterize internal and external factors that underlie inter-individual variability in DNA damage and repair and to identify dietary habits beneficial for maintaining DNA integrity. Habitual diet was estimated in 340 healthy individuals using a food frequency questionnaire and biomarkers of antioxidant status were quantified in fasting blood samples. Markers of DNA integrity were represented by DNA strand breaks, oxidized purines, oxidized pyrimidines and a sum of all three as total DNA damage. DNA repair was characterized by genetic variants and functional activities of base and nucleotide excision repair pathways. Sex, fruit-based food consumption and XPG genotype were factors significantly associated with the level of DNA damage. DNA damage was higher in women (p=0.035). Fruit consumption was negatively associated with the number of all measured DNA lesions, and this effect was mediated mostly by ß-cryptoxanthin and ß-tocopherol (p
PubMed ID
24674629 View in PubMed
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Concentrations of phthalates and bisphenol A in Norwegian foods and beverages and estimated dietary exposure in adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259320
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Dec;73:259-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Amrit K Sakhi
Inger Therese L Lillegaard
Stefan Voorspoels
Monica H Carlsen
Elin B Løken
Anne L Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle M Meltzer
Cathrine Thomsen
Source
Environ Int. 2014 Dec;73:259-69
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Benzhydryl Compounds - analysis
Beverages - analysis
Diet
Environmental Exposure
Food analysis
Humans
Norway
Phenols - analysis
Phthalic Acids - analysis
Plasticizers - analysis
Abstract
Phthalates and bisphenol A (BPA) are ubiquitous in our environment. These chemicals have been characterized as endocrine disruptors that can cause functional impairment of development and reproduction. Processed and packaged foods are among the major sources of human exposure to these chemicals. No previous report showing the levels of these chemicals in food items purchased in Norway is available. The aim of the present study was to determine the concentration of ten different phthalates and BPA in foods and beverages purchased on the Norwegian market and estimate the daily dietary exposure in the Norwegian adult population. Commonly consumed foods and beverages in Norway were purchased in a grocery store and analysed using gas- and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Daily dietary exposures to these chemicals in the Norwegian adult population were estimated using the latest National dietary survey, Norkost 3 (2010-2011). This study showed that phthalates and BPA are found in all foods and beverages that are common to consume in Norway. The detection frequency of phthalates in the food items varied from 11% for dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCHP) to 84% for di-iso-nonyl phthalate (DiNP), one of the substitutes for bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). BPA was found in 54% of the food items analysed. Among the different phthalates, the highest concentrations were found for DEHP and DiNP in the food items. Estimated dietary exposures were also equally high and dominated by DEHP and DiNP (400-500 ng/kg body weight (bw)/day), followed by di-iso-butyl phthalate (DiBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), di-n-octyl phthalate (DnOP) and di-iso-decyl phthalate (DiDP) (30-40 ng/kg bw/day). Dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethylphthalate (DEP) and DCHP had the lowest concentrations and the exposures were around 10-20 ng/kg bw/day. Estimated dietary exposure to BPA was 5 ng/kg bw/day. In general, levels of phthalates and BPA in foods and beverages from the Norwegian market are comparable to other countries worldwide. Grain and meat products were the major contributors of exposure to these chemicals in the Norwegian adult population. The estimated dietary exposures to these chemicals were considerably lower than their respective tolerable daily intake (TDI) values established by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA).
PubMed ID
25173060 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of energy and dietary intake estimates from a food frequency questionnaire using independent energy expenditure measurement and weighed food records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140791
Source
Nutr J. 2010;9:37
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Monica H Carlsen
Inger T L Lillegaard
Anette Karlsen
Rune Blomhoff
Christian A Drevon
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute for Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. m.h.carlsen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Nutr J. 2010;9:37
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Diet Records
Diet Surveys
Energy intake
Energy Metabolism
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Abstract
We have developed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for the assessment of habitual diet, with special focus on the intake of fruit, vegetables and other antioxidant-rich foods and beverages. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relative validity of the intakes of energy, food and nutrients from the FFQ.
Energy intake was evaluated against independent measures of energy expenditure using the ActiReg® system (motion detection), whereas 7-days weighed food records were used to study the relative validity of food and nutrient intake. The relationship between methods was investigated using correlation analyses and cross-classification of participants. The visual agreement between the methods was evaluated using Bland-Altman plots.
We observed that the FFQ underestimated the energy intake by approximately 11% compared to the energy expenditure measured by the ActiReg®. The correlation coefficient between energy intake and energy expenditure was 0.54 and 32% of the participants were defined as under-reporters. Compared to the weighed food records the percentages of energy from fat and added sugar from the FFQ were underestimated, whereas the percentage of energy from total carbohydrates and protein were slightly overestimated. The intake of foods rich in antioxidants did not vary significantly between the FFQ and weighed food records, with the exceptions of berries, coffee, tea and vegetables which were overestimated. Spearman's Rank Order Correlations between FFQ and weighed food records were 0.41 for berries, 0.58 for chocolate, 0.78 for coffee, 0.61 for fruit, 0.57 for fruit and berry juices, 0.40 for nuts, 0.74 for tea, 0.38 for vegetables and 0.70 for the intake of wine.
Our new FFQ provides a good estimate of the average energy intake and it obtains valid data on average intake of most antioxidant-rich foods and beverages. Our study also showed that the FFQs ability to rank participants according to intake of total antioxidants and most of the antioxidant-rich foods was good.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20843361 View in PubMed
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Intakes of culinary herbs and spices from a food frequency questionnaire evaluated against 28-days estimated records.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134477
Source
Nutr J. 2011;10:50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Monica H Carlsen
Rune Blomhoff
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute for Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Norway. m.h.carlsen@medisin.uio.no
Source
Nutr J. 2011;10:50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants
Asteraceae
Diet
Female
Food
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Spices
Abstract
Worldwide, herbs and spices are much used food flavourings. However, little data exist regarding actual dietary intake of culinary herbs and spices. We developed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) for the assessment of habitual diet the preceding year, with focus on phytochemical rich food, including herbs and spices. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the intakes of herbs and spices from the FFQ with estimates of intake from another dietary assessment method. Thus we compared the intake estimates from the FFQ with 28 days of estimated records of herb and spice consumption as a reference method.
The evaluation study was conducted among 146 free living adults, who filled in the FFQ and 2-4 weeks later carried out 28 days recording of herb and spice consumption. The FFQ included a section with questions about 27 individual culinary herbs and spices, while the records were open ended records for recording of herbs and spice consumption exclusively.
Our study showed that the FFQ obtained slightly higher estimates of total intake of herbs and spices than the total intake assessed by the Herbs and Spice Records (HSR). The correlation between the two assessment methods with regard to total intake was good (r = 0.5), and the cross-classification suggests that the FFQ may be used to classify subjects according to total herb and spice intake. For the 8 most frequently consumed individual herbs and spices, the FFQ obtained good estimates of median frequency of intake for 2 herbs/spices, while good estimates of portion sizes were obtained for 4 out of 8 herbs/spices.
Our results suggested that the FFQ was able to give good estimates of frequency of intake and portion sizes on group level for several of the most frequently used herbs and spices. The FFQ was only able to fairly rank subjects according to frequency of intake of the 8 most frequently consumed herbs and spices. Other studies are warranted to further explore the intakes of culinary spices and herbs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21575177 View in PubMed
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Iodine intake among children and adolescents in Norway: Estimates from the national dietary survey Ungkost 3 (2015-2016).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307988
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2020 Mar; 58:126427
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2020
Author
Anine C Medin
Monica H Carlsen
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1046 Blindern, 0317 Oslo, Norway; Department of Nutrition and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, 4630 Kristiansand, Norway. Electronic address: anine.medin@uia.no.
Source
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2020 Mar; 58:126427
Date
Mar-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Food
Humans
Iodine - metabolism
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Recommended dietary allowances
Abstract
Iodine is crucial for normal growth and neurodevelopment. Before 1950, goitre caused by iodine deficiency was widespread in Norway, but decreased significantly after mandatory fortification of animal fodder. Recent dietary changes in milk consumption and fish intake may again have increased the risk of inadequate intakes in some population groups in Norway. The situation for children and adolescents is unclear, and data from nationally representative studies are highly needed. We aimed to describe the iodine intake in Norwegian children and adolescents and estimate the proportion of individuals with an increased risk of suboptimal, adequate and excessive usual iodine intake. In addition, we aimed to investigate whether individuals' characteristics were associated with iodine intake, and to identify the major iodine contributing foods in the diet of this population.
Data from 1722 individuals (4-, 9- and 13-year-olds) from a national dietary survey in Norway from 2015-2016 was used. Both descriptive and inferential statistics were conducted. Usual iodine intakes were estimated, stratified by age group and sex and compared to dietary reference intake cut-offs. Linear regression models were used to assess the association between iodine intake and participants' characteristics. The contribution of iodine from different foods was described for all and across different participant groups.
We estimated that the proportion of participants with an increased risk of a suboptimal usual intake of iodine varied from 3-36%. A significant increased risk was observed for older children and girls compared to younger children and boys. Excessive usual intakes were not observed in any age group. Iodine intake was associated with sex, maternal educational level and area of residence. A lower intake was observed for girls and those with a mother with a low educational level. Moreover, those living in the western part and Mid-Norway had statistically significantly higher intakes compared to those living in the capital city and surroundings. Milk, milk products, cheese, fish and shellfish were the main contributors to iodine intake. Supplements contributed with very little of the total iodine intake.
We have shown that the estimated risk of suboptimal usual iodine intakes among children and adolescents in Norway varies according to age, sex, maternal educational level and area of residence. Those with a limited intake of the main dietary contributors to iodine intake may be at risk, and adolescent girls seem to be especially vulnerable.
PubMed ID
31770674 View in PubMed
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Iodine Intake in Norwegian Women and Men: The Population-Based Tromsø Study 2015-2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304368
Source
Nutrients. 2020 Oct 23; 12(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-23-2020
Author
Ahmed A Madar
Espen Heen
Laila A Hopstock
Monica H Carlsen
Haakon E Meyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Global Health, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, 0318 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Nutrients. 2020 Oct 23; 12(11):
Date
Oct-23-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Ensuring sufficient iodine intake is a public health priority, but we lack knowledge about the status of iodine in a nationally representative population in Norway. We aimed to assess the current iodine status and intake in a Norwegian adult population. In the population-based Tromsø Study 2015-2016, 493 women and men aged 40-69 years collected 24-h urine samples and 450 participants also completed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The 24-h urinary iodine concentration (UIC) was analyzed using the Sandell-Kolthoff reaction on microplates followed by colorimetric measurement. Iodine intake was estimated from the FFQ using a food and nutrient calculation system at the University of Oslo. The mean urine volume in 24 h was 1.74 L. The median daily iodine intake estimated (UIE) from 24-h UIC was 159 µg/day (133 and 174 µg/day in women and men). The median daily iodine intake estimated from FFQ was 281 µg/day (263 and 318 µg/day in women and men, respectively). Iodine intake estimated from 24-h UIC and FFQ were moderately correlated (Spearman rank correlation coefficient r = 0.39, p
PubMed ID
33114042 View in PubMed
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Iodine Intake in Norwegian Women and Men: The Population-Based Tromsø Study 2015-2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311782
Source
Nutrients. 2020 Oct 23; 12(11):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-23-2020
Author
Ahmed A Madar
Espen Heen
Laila A Hopstock
Monica H Carlsen
Haakon E Meyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Global Health, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, 0318 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Nutrients. 2020 Oct 23; 12(11):
Date
Oct-23-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dairy Products - analysis
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Eggs - analysis
Female
Fish Products - analysis
Humans
Iodine - deficiency - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nutritional Status
Prospective Studies
Seafood - analysis
Sex Distribution
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Ensuring sufficient iodine intake is a public health priority, but we lack knowledge about the status of iodine in a nationally representative population in Norway. We aimed to assess the current iodine status and intake in a Norwegian adult population. In the population-based Tromsø Study 2015-2016, 493 women and men aged 40-69 years collected 24-h urine samples and 450 participants also completed a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The 24-h urinary iodine concentration (UIC) was analyzed using the Sandell-Kolthoff reaction on microplates followed by colorimetric measurement. Iodine intake was estimated from the FFQ using a food and nutrient calculation system at the University of Oslo. The mean urine volume in 24 h was 1.74 L. The median daily iodine intake estimated (UIE) from 24-h UIC was 159 µg/day (133 and 174 µg/day in women and men). The median daily iodine intake estimated from FFQ was 281 µg/day (263 and 318 µg/day in women and men, respectively). Iodine intake estimated from 24-h UIC and FFQ were moderately correlated (Spearman rank correlation coefficient r = 0.39, p
PubMed ID
33114042 View in PubMed
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New Iodine Food Composition Database and Updated Calculations of Iodine Intake among Norwegians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295678
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Jul 20; 10(7):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-20-2018
Author
Monica H Carlsen
Lene F Andersen
Lisbeth Dahl
Nina Norberg
Anette Hjartåker
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, 0372 Oslo, Norway. m.h.carlsen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Jul 20; 10(7):
Date
Jul-20-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Beverages - analysis
Databases, Factual
Diet
Diet Surveys
Feeding Behavior
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Iodine - administration & dosage - analysis - deficiency
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Trace Elements - administration & dosage - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Iodine food composition data of Norwegian foods have been sparse and knowledge about different dietary iodine sources limited. We compiled a comprehensive iodine food composition database and estimated dietary iodine intake among adults in the latest Norwegian national dietary survey (Norkost 3). The iodine content of food and beverages were compiled using international guidelines and standards. Iodine content of 3259 food items were compiled, including analytical values, values from other food composition databases, estimated values, and values that were based on recipes. Estimated iodine intake in the Norkost 3 population ranged from 15 to 1462 µg/day. Men had significantly higher intake of iodine than women (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
30037013 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.