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Injuries at the Canadian National Tae Kwon Do Championships: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179070
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2004 Jul 27;5:22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-2004
Author
Mohsen Kazemi
Willy Pieter
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Studies, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mkazemi@cmcc.ca
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2004 Jul 27;5:22
Date
Jul-27-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Back Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Brain Concussion - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Contusions - epidemiology - etiology
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Leg Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Martial Arts - injuries
Prospective Studies
Sex Factors
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Sprains and Strains - epidemiology - etiology
United States - ethnology
Abstract
The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the injury rates in male and female adult Canadian Taekwondo athletes relative to total number of injuries, type and body part injured.
Subjects (219 males, 99 females) participated in the 1997 Canadian National Taekwondo Championships in Toronto, Canada. Injuries were recorded on an injury form to documents any injury seen and treatment provided by the health care team. These data were later used for this study. The injury form describes the athlete and nature, site, severity and mechanism of the injury.
The overall rate of injuries was 62.9/1,000 athlete-exposures (A-E). The males (79.9/1,000 A-E) sustained significantly more injuries than the females (25.3/1,000 A-E). The lower extremities were the most commonly injured body region in the men (32.0 /1,000 A-E), followed by the head and neck (18.3/1,000 A-E). Injuries to the spine (neck, upper back, low back and coccyx) were the third most often injured body region in males (13.8/1,000 A-E). All injuries to the women were sustained to the lower extremities. The most common type of injury in women was the contusion (15.2/1,000 A-E). However, men's most common type of injury was the sprain (22.8/1,000 A-E) followed by joint dysfunction (13.7/1,000 A-E). Concussions were only reported in males (6.9/1,000 A-E). Compared to international counterparts, the Canadian men and women recorded lower total injury rates. However, the males incurred more cerebral concussions than their American colleagues (4.7/1,000 A-E).
Similar to what was found in previous studies, the current investigation seems to suggest that areas of particular concern for preventive measures involve the head and neck as well as the lower extremities. This is the first paper to identify spinal joint dysfunction.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15279679 View in PubMed
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Pre-competition habits and injuries in Taekwondo athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174545
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2005;6:26
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Mohsen Kazemi
Heather Shearer
Young Su Choung
Author Affiliation
Clinical education, Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mkazemi@cmcc.ca
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2005;6:26
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arm Injuries - epidemiology
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Back Injuries - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Competitive Behavior
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology
Female
Habits
Humans
Leg Injuries - epidemiology
Male
Martial Arts - psychology
Physical Education and Training
Pilot Projects
Practice (Psychology)
Retrospective Studies
Social Support
Time Factors
Weight Loss
Abstract
Over the past decade, there has been heightened interest in injury rates sustained by martial arts athletes, and more specifically, Taekwondo athletes. Despite this interest, there is a paucity of research on pre-competition habits and training of these athletes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess training characteristics, competition preparation habits, and injury profiles of Taekwondo athletes.
A retrospective survey of Canadian male and female Taekwondo athletes competing in a national tournament was conducted. Competitors at a Canadian national level tournament were given a comprehensive survey prior to competition. Items on training characteristics, diet, and injuries sustained during training and competition were included. Questionnaires were distributed to 60 athletes.
A response rate of 46.7% was achieved. Of those that responded, 54% dieted prior to competition, and 36% dieted and exercised pre-competition. Sixty-four percent of the athletes practised between 4-6 times per week, with 54% practicing 2 hours per session. Lower limb injuries were the most common (46.5%), followed by upper extremity (18%), back (10%), and head (3.6%). The majority of injuries consisted of sprains/strains (45%), followed by contusions, fractures, and concussions. More injuries occurred during training, including 59% of first injuries.
More research needs to be conducted to further illustrate the need for appropriate regulations on weight cycling and injury prevention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15921510 View in PubMed
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Relationships between injury and success in elite Taekwondo athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128824
Source
J Sports Sci. 2012;30(3):277-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mohsen Kazemi
Author Affiliation
Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mkazemi@cmcc.ca
Source
J Sports Sci. 2012;30(3):277-83
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Athletes
Athletic Performance
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Martial Arts - injuries
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the rate and type of injury in elite Canadian Taekwondo athletes, before and during competition and to investigate the relationship between past injuries, injuries during competition and success. This retrospective case-series study incorporated Taekwondo injuries sustained by 75 male and female elite Canadian Taekwondo athletes over 10 years and its relationship to athletes' success by means of gaining medals during competition. A logistic regression model (using the Generalised Estimating Equations (GEE) method) was used to investigate the relationship between injuries and success. Injury rate was associated with performance after holding variables constant (Odds Ratio (OR) = 0.124, P = 0.039). Moreover, with each additional injury per match, competitors were 88% (1-0.124) less likely to win a medal. Although not statistically significant, additional injuries prior to competition were associated with a 30% increase in medal prevalence (OR = 1.299, P = 0.203). When comparing athletes (gender, tournament difficulty, injury variables), a competitor who is one year older is 10% less likely to medal (OR = 0.897, P = 0.068). When an additional injury occurred during competition, the athlete was 88% less likely to win a medal. Prevention, correct diagnosis, and immediate therapeutic intervention by qualified health care providers are important.
PubMed ID
22165861 View in PubMed
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