Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Impacts of a support intervention for low-income women who smoke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139863
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Dec;71(11):1901-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Miriam J Stewart
Kaysi Eastlick Kushner
Lorraine Greaves
Nicole Letourneau
Denise Spitzer
Madeline Boscoe
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Faculty of Nursing, 3rd Floor Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2010 Dec;71(11):1901-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cities
Consumer Satisfaction
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Poverty - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Qualitative Research
Self-Help Groups
Smoking - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Abstract
The objective of this pilot study was to implement and evaluate the impact of a support intervention tailored to the assessed support needs, resources and preferences of low-income women who smoke in three Canadian cities. The support intervention, informed by theoretical foundations, provided holistic one-to-one and group support over 14 weeks. The support intervention was facilitated by trained professional and peer facilitators. The impact was evaluated through analysis of qualitative and quantitative data collected at pre-, post-, and delayed post-test contacts. This analysis revealed that the intervention exerted positive impacts on smoking reduction/cessation, social networks, coping, and health behaviors. Participants reported satisfaction with the intervention.
Notes
Comment In: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Dec;71(11):1910-2; discussion 1912-320888107
PubMed ID
20970232 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lay understandings of the effects of poverty: a Canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172455
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2005 Nov;13(6):514-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Linda I Reutter
Gerry Veenstra
Miriam J Stewart
Dennis Raphael
Rhonda Love
Edward Makwarimba
Susan McMurray
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Canada. Linda.Reutter@ualberta.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2005 Nov;13(6):514-30
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health
Canada
Consumer Participation - economics
Diet - economics
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty
Public Opinion
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Although there is a large body of research dedicated to exploring public attributions for poverty, considerably less attention has been directed to public understandings about the effects of poverty. In this paper, we describe lay understandings of the effects of poverty and the factors that potentially influence these perceptions, using data from a telephone survey conducted in 2002 on a random sample (n=1671) of adults from eight neighbourhoods in two large Canadian cities (Edmonton and Toronto). These data were supplemented with interview data obtained from 153 people living in these same neighbourhoods. Multivariate linear and logistic regressions were used to determine the effects of basic demographic variables, exposure to poverty and attribution for poverty on three dependent variables relating to the effects of poverty: participation in community life, the relationship between poverty and health and challenges facing low-income people. Ninety-one per cent of survey respondents agreed that poverty is linked to health, while 68% agreed that low-income people are less likely to participate in community life. Affordable housing was deemed especially difficult to obtain by 96%, but other resources (obtaining healthy food, giving children a good start in life, and engaging in healthy behaviours) were also viewed as challenging by at least 70% of respondents. The regression models revealed that when controlling for demographics, exposure to poverty explained some of the variance in recognising the effects of poverty. Media exposure positively influenced recognition of the poverty-health link, and attending formal talks was strongly related to understanding challenges of poverty. Attributions for poverty accounted for slightly more of the variance in the dependent variables. Specifically, structural and sociocultural attributions predicted greater recognition of the effects of poverty, in particular the challenges of poverty, while individualistic attributions predicted less recognition. Older and female respondents were more likely to acknowledge the effects of poverty. Income was positively associated with recognition of the poverty-health link, negatively associated with understanding the challenges of low-income people, and unrelated to perceptions of the negative effect of poverty on participation in community life.
PubMed ID
16218981 View in PubMed
Less detail

Low-income Canadians' experiences with health-related services: implications for health care reform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174169
Source
Health Policy. 2006 Mar;76(1):106-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Deanna L Williamson
Miriam J Stewart
Karen Hayward
Nicole Letourneau
Edward Makwarimba
Jeff Masuda
Kim Raine
Linda Reutter
Irving Rootman
Douglas Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Ecology, University of Alberta, 302 Human Ecology Building, Edmonton, Alta., Canada T6G 2N1. deanna.williamson@ualberta.ca
Source
Health Policy. 2006 Mar;76(1):106-21
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Canada
Female
Health Care Reform
Health services
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
National Health Programs
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Poverty
Abstract
This study investigated the use of health-related services by low-income Canadians living in two large cities, Edmonton and Toronto. Interview data collected from low-income people, service providers and managers, advocacy group representatives, and senior-level public servants were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Findings indicate that, in addition to health care policies and programs, a broad range of policies, programs, and services relating to income security, recreation, and housing influence the ability of low-income Canadians to attain, maintain, and enhance their health. Furthermore, the manner in which health-related services are delivered plays a key role in low-income people's service-use decisions. We conclude the paper with a discussion of the health and social policy implications of the findings, which are particularly relevant within the context of recent health care reform discussions in Canada.
PubMed ID
15978694 View in PubMed
Less detail

Where there is smoke, there is stress: low-income women identify support needs and preferences for smoking reduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135471
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2011 May;32(5):359-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Miriam J Stewart
Lorraine Greaves
Kaysi Eastlick Kushner
Nicole L Letourneau
Denise L Spitzer
Madeline Boscoe
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2011 May;32(5):359-83
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Middle Aged
Poverty
Self-Help Groups
Smoking Cessation
Social Support
Stress, Psychological
Women's health
Abstract
Efforts to assist low-income women with tobacco reduction and cessation have typically not been informed by assessment of their needs and wishes. This multi-site qualitative study focused on assessing 64 low-income women's support needs and intervention preferences. These women were interested in smoking cessation, but identified many barriers and needed appropriate supports. However, available smoking cessation programs did not address underlying conditions, such as income instability and stress. The support recommended was psychosocial (e.g., buddy and group support), included self-care (e.g., nutrition, activity, and personal time), and reflected their social-economic circumstances (e.g., free cessation aids and child care).
PubMed ID
21476158 View in PubMed
Less detail

"Who do they think we are, anyway?": perceptions of and responses to poverty stigma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152575
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Mar;19(3):297-311
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Linda I Reutter
Miriam J Stewart
Gerry Veenstra
Rhonda Love
Dennis Raphael
Edward Makwarimba
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Qual Health Res. 2009 Mar;19(3):297-311
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Poverty
Prejudice
Self Concept
Abstract
In this article, we report on qualitative findings pertaining to low-income people's perceptions of and responses to "poverty stigma," a key component of social exclusion with important implications for health and well-being. Our findings are drawn from a multimethod study designed to investigate experiences of social exclusion and social isolation among people living on low incomes. We conducted semistructured individual interviews (n = 59) and group interviews (total n = 34) with low-income residents of two large Canadian cities. Data were analyzed using thematic content analysis techniques. Participants overwhelmingly thought that other members of society tend to view them as a burden to society-as lazy, disregarding of opportunities, irresponsible, and opting for an easy life. Low-income people responded to perceived stigma with a variety of cognitive and behavioral strategies that reflected their efforts to reconcile their perceived "social" and "personal" identities. These strategies included confronting discrimination directly, disregarding responses from others, helping other low-income people, withdrawing and isolating themselves from others, engaging in processes of cognitive distancing, and concealing their financial situation.
PubMed ID
19224874 View in PubMed
Less detail