Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

Asthma Programme in Finland: the quality of primary care spirometry is good.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154909
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2008 Dec;17(4):226-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Leena Tuomisto
Vesa Jarvinen
Jukka Laitinen
Marina Erhola
Minna Kaila
Pirkko Brander
Author Affiliation
Pulmonary Department, Seinajoki Central Hospital, Seinajoki, Finland. leena.tuomisto@gmail.com
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2008 Dec;17(4):226-31
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Finland
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates - physiology
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Male
Medical Audit
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care
Program Evaluation
Referral and Consultation
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Spirometry
Young Adult
Abstract
To assess the quality of primary care spirometry by visual inspection of the flow-volume expiratory curve and to study the quantity of clinical information provided on the spirometry report sheets.
Retrospective audit of 868 expiratory flow-volume curves referred to three pulmonary clinics assessed against five predefined quality criteria. Clinical information included on the spirometry report sheets was also collected.
Quality was good in 78% of pre-bronchodilation curves and in 80% of post-bronchodilation curves. Obtaining a sharp PEF value and full vital capacity exhalation seemed to be the critical points of measurement. Inter-rater reliability of the curve assessment was mainly good. Data on where the spirometry took place, and comments on the use of respiratory medication and patient co-operation were often lacking.
The quality of primary care spirometry was good. Adequate clinical information on the report sheets would further improve the quality of this diagnostic process.
Notes
Comment In: Prim Care Respir J. 2009 Sep;18(3):231-2; author reply 23219662322
Erratum In: Prim Care Respir J. 2009 Sep;18(3):184
PubMed ID
18830519 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maternal and perinatal characteristics and the risk of cow's milk allergy in infants up to 2 years of age: a case-control study nested in the Finnish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143535
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun 15;171(12):1310-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2010
Author
Johanna Metsälä
Annamari Lundqvist
Minna Kaila
Mika Gissler
Timo Klaukka
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health, Functional Capacity and Welfare, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. johanna.metsala@thl.fi
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun 15;171(12):1310-6
Date
Jun-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Case-Control Studies
Cattle
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Milk - immunology
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
This study examined whether maternal background and perinatal factors were associated with the risk of cow's milk allergy (CMA) in infants up to 2 years of age in a nested case-control study. All children born in 1996-2004 in Finland and diagnosed with CMA by 2006 were identified (n = 16,237). For each case, one matched control was selected. Information on maternal and perinatal factors was derived from the Medical Birth Register. The associations were analyzed by conditional logistic regression. Cesarean section (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10, 1.27) and high maternal age (> or =35 years; adjusted OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.36) were associated with increased risk, whereas low maternal socioeconomic status (adjusted OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.71), smoking (adjusted OR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.67, 0.79), high number of previous deliveries (> or =5; adjusted OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.59, 0.86), and multiple pregnancy (adjusted OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.60, 0.82) were associated with decreased risk of CMA. In conclusion, maternal background and perinatal factors may play a role in the development of CMA, but further research is needed to clarify these associations and the underpinning biologic mechanisms.
PubMed ID
20472571 View in PubMed
Less detail

Patient-specific computer-based decision support in primary healthcare--a randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256870
Source
Implement Sci. 2014;9:15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Tiina Kortteisto
Jani Raitanen
Jorma Komulainen
Ilkka Kunnamo
Marjukka Mäkelä
Pekka Rissanen
Minna Kaila
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. tiina.kortteisto@uta.fi.
Source
Implement Sci. 2014;9:15
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Decision Support Systems, Clinical - organization & administration
Electronic Health Records - organization & administration
Female
Finland
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
Reminder Systems
Young Adult
Abstract
Computer-based decision support systems are a promising method for incorporating research evidence into clinical practice. However, evidence is still scant on how such information technology solutions work in primary healthcare when support is provided across many health problems. In Finland, we designed a trial where a set of evidence-based, patient-specific reminders was introduced into the local Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system. The aim was to measure the effects of such reminders on patient care. The hypothesis was that the total number of triggered reminders would decrease in the intervention group compared with the control group, indicating an improvement in patient care.
From July 2009 to October 2010 all the patients of one health center were randomized to an intervention or a control group. The intervention consisted of patient-specific reminders concerning 59 different health conditions triggered when the healthcare professional (HCP) opened and used the EPR. In the intervention group, the triggered reminders were shown to the HCP; in the control group, the triggered reminders were not shown. The primary outcome measure was the change in the number of reminders triggered over 12 months. We developed a unique data gathering method, the Repeated Study Virtual Health Check (RSVHC), and used Generalized Estimation Equations (GEE) for analysing the incidence rate ratio, which is a measure of the relative difference in percentage change in the numbers of reminders triggered in the intervention group and the control group.
In total, 13,588 participants were randomized and included. Contrary to our expectation, the total number of reminders triggered increased in both the intervention and the control groups. The primary outcome measure did not show a significant difference between the groups. However, with the inclusion of patients followed up over only six months, the total number of reminders increased significantly less in the intervention group than in the control group when the confounding factors (age, gender, number of diagnoses and medications) were controlled for.
Computerized, tailored reminders in primary care did not decrease during the 12 months of follow-up time after the introduction of a patient-specific decision support system.
ClinicalTrial.gov NCT00915304.
Notes
Cites: J Med Syst. 2012 Dec;36(6):3677-8422402980
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:34923039113
Cites: BMJ. 2013;346:f65723412440
Cites: Inform Prim Care. 2008;16(2):79-9118713524
Cites: Fam Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;41(7):502-719582636
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;(3):CD00109619588323
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2009 Oct;18(5):385-9219812102
Cites: Popul Health Manag. 2009 Oct;12(5):221-619848563
Cites: Am J Surg. 2009 Nov;198(5):670-419887197
Cites: J Am Board Fam Med. 2009 Nov-Dec;22(6):625-3219897690
Cites: Pediatrics. 2010 Apr;125(4):e770-720231191
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2010 Aug;19 Suppl 2:i25-3320693213
Cites: PLoS Med. 2011;8(1):e100038721267058
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2011 May;80(5):351-821411365
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2012 Jul-Aug;19(4):555-6122215056
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Feb 14;160(3):301-810668831
Cites: Biometrics. 2001 Mar;57(1):120-511252586
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Jul 7;323(7303):42-611440947
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Feb 9;359(9305):515-911853818
Cites: ACP J Club. 2002 Mar-Apr;136(2):A11-411874303
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2003 Feb;12(1):47-5212571345
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2003 Feb;15(1):31-4512630799
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2004 Jul;47(2):201-1115196194
Cites: JAMA. 1987 Jul 3;258(1):61-63586293
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Nov 15;153(10):1423-317585368
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Mar 9;293(10):1223-3815755945
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Apr 2;330(7494):76515767266
Cites: J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2005 Jul-Aug;12(4):431-715802479
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2007;7:1617451599
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2008 Mar;77(3):199-20717631412
Cites: Fam Pract. 2008 Jun;25(3):162-718504253
PubMed ID
24444113 View in PubMed
Less detail

Time trends in allergic sensitisation and Helicobacter pylori prevalence in Finnish pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151730
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009;150(1):83-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Tapio Seiskari
Hanna Viskari
Minna Kaila
Anna-Maija Haapala
Pentti Koskela
Heikki Hyöty
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. tapio.seiskari@uta.fi
Source
Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2009;150(1):83-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allergens - immunology
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Female
Finland
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Helicobacter pylori
Humans
Hypersensitivity - immunology - microbiology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Pregnancy - immunology
Prevalence
Time
Young Adult
Abstract
An increase in the prevalence of allergic conditions has been documented in Finland, correlating with the diminishing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infections. We investigated whether the increase of allergic sensitisation still continues and correlates with the prevalence of H. pylori infections.
The sera from 958 pregnant women in 1983, 1989, 1995 and 2001 were analysed for the presence of antibodies against H. pylori. In addition, allergen-specific IgE antibodies and total levels of IgE antibodies were measured.
A clear birth cohort effect was found in the prevalence of allergic sensitization: allergen-specific IgE was more frequent among recent birth cohorts than earlier ones (p = 0.001). The frequency of H. pylori antibodies followed the opposite trend (p
PubMed ID
19339806 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of web-based patient education sessions on psychiatric wards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126543
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2012 Jun;81(6):424-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Minna Anttila
Maritta Välimäki
Heli Hätönen
Tiina Luukkaala
Minna Kaila
Author Affiliation
Finnish Post-Graduate School in Nursing Science and University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, Finland. minna.anttila@utu.fi
Source
Int J Med Inform. 2012 Jun;81(6):424-33
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Education, Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Psychiatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Middle Aged
Nurses - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the use of web-based patient education sessions in the psychiatric inpatient care.
The qualitative and quantitative data was collected from 93 patients' evaluation reports in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland completed by 83 nurses.
The web-education included six patient education sessions which were used over a period lasting between 1 and 70 days and took 10-360 min per patient. Out of 508 sessions, 464 had no interruptions or disturbances, 37 sessions had disturbances and seven sessions were interrupted. Three fourths of the sessions were used successfully. Factors associated with use were patients' vocational education level, mental status, diagnoses, number of nurses involved and hospital.
It is important to invest effort in web-based patient education during patients' hospitalization and to use it even with patients suffering from serious mental health disorders. This is meant to provide more alternatives in nursing.
PubMed ID
22381805 View in PubMed
Less detail