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The association between asthma and type 1 diabetes: a paediatric case-cohort study in Finland, years 1981-2009.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298640
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 47(2):409-416
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-01-2018
Author
Johanna Metsälä
Annamari Lundqvist
Lauri J Virta
Minna Kaila
Mika Gissler
Suvi M Virtanen
Jaakko Nevalainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01; 47(2):409-416
Date
04-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
The association between asthma and type 1 diabetes, two chronic, immune-mediated diseases, has been of longstanding interest, but the evidence is still conflicting. We examined this association in a large, nationwide case-cohort study among Finnish children, using a novel statistical approach.
Among the initial cohort of all children born between 1 January 1981 and 31 December 2008, those who were diagnosed with asthma (n?=?81 473) or type 1 diabetes (n?=?9541) up to age 16 years by the end of 2009 were identified from the Central Drug Register maintained by the Social Insurance Institution of Finland. A 10% random sample from each initial birth year cohort was selected as a reference cohort (n?=?171 138). The association between asthma and type 1 diabetes was studied using a multistate modelling approach to estimate transition rates between healthy and disease states since birth. Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to represent the change in the transition rate between the disease states.
After adjusting for sex and birth decade, previous diagnosis of asthma increased the risk of subsequent type 1 diabetes by 41% (95% CI: 1.28, 1.54), whereas previous diagnosis of type 1 diabetes decreased the risk of subsequent asthma by 18% (95% CI: 0.69, 0.98).
The findings of the present study imply that the association between the diseases is more complex than previously thought, and its direction depends on the sequential appearance of the diseases.
PubMed ID
29211844 View in PubMed
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Modularising outpatient care delivery: A mixed methods case study at a Finnish University Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299931
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 2018 11; 31(4):195-204
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2018
Author
Katariina Silander
Paulus Torkki
Antti Peltokorpi
Aino Lepäntalo
Maija Tarkkanen
Petri Bono
Katariina Klintrup
Minna Kaila
Author Affiliation
1 Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 2018 11; 31(4):195-204
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Female
Finland
Health Personnel
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Abstract
Modularisation is a potential means to develop health care delivery by combining standardisation and customisation. However, little is known about the effects of modularisation on hospital care. The objective was to analyse how modularisation may change and support health care delivery in specialised hospital care.
A mixed methods case study methodology was applied using both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, field notes, documents, service usage data, bed count and personnel resource data. Data from a reference hospital's unit were used to understand the context and development of care delivery in general.
The following outcome themes were identified from the interviews: balance between demand and supply; support in shift from inpatient to outpatient care; shorter treatment times and improved management of service production. Modularisation supported the shift from inpatient towards outpatient care. Changes in resource efficiency measures were both positive and negative; the number of patients per personnel decreased, while the number of visits per personnel and the bed utilisation rate increased.
Modularisation may support health care providers in classifying patients and delivering services according to patients' needs. However, as the findings are based on a single university hospital case study, more research is needed.
PubMed ID
29336174 View in PubMed
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