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Age at the introduction of solid foods during the first year and allergic sensitization at age 5 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146877
Source
Pediatrics. 2010 Jan;125(1):50-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Bright I Nwaru
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Suvi Ahonen
Minna Kaila
Anna-Maija Haapala
Carina Kronberg-Kippilä
Raili Salmelin
Riitta Veijola
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Finland. bright.nwaru@uta.fi
Source
Pediatrics. 2010 Jan;125(1):50-9
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Feeding
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Food Hypersensitivity - immunology - prevention & control
Humans
Immunization
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - immunology
Infant
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Nutritional Requirements
Odds Ratio
Probability
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology - prevention & control
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Abstract
The goal was to examine the relationship between age at the introduction of solid foods during the first year of life and allergic sensitization in 5-year-old children.
We analyzed data from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention nutrition study, a prospective, birth cohort study. We studied 994 children with HLA-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes mellitus for whom information on breastfeeding, age at the introduction of solid foods, and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E levels at 5 years was available. The association between age at the introduction of solid foods and allergic sensitization was analyzed by using logistic regression.
The median duration of exclusive breastfeeding was 1.8 months (range: 0-10 months). After adjustment for potential confounders, late introduction of potatoes (>4 months), oats (>5 months), rye (>7 months), wheat (>6 months), meat (>5.5 months), fish (>8.2 months), and eggs (>10.5 months) was significantly directly associated with sensitization to food allergens. Late introduction of potatoes, rye, meat, and fish was significantly associated with sensitization to any inhalant allergen. In models that included all solid foods that were significantly related to the end points, eggs, oats, and wheat remained the most important foods related to sensitization to food allergens, whereas potatoes and fish were the most important foods associated with inhalant allergic sensitization. We found no evidence of reverse causality, taking into account parental allergic rhinitis and asthma.
Late introduction of solid foods was associated with increased risk of allergic sensitization to food and inhalant allergens.
PubMed ID
19969611 View in PubMed
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Dietary fatty acid composition during pregnancy and the risk of asthma in the offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131184
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011 Dec;22(8):827-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Mirka Lumia
Päivi Luukkainen
Heli Tapanainen
Minna Kaila
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Liisa Uusitalo
Sari Niinistö
Michael G Kenward
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Riitta Veijola
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Unit, Department of Lifestyle and Participation, National Institute of Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. mirka.lumia@fimnet.fi
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011 Dec;22(8):827-35
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - genetics
Diet, High-Fat - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DQ beta-Chains - genetics
Humans
Incidence
Male
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology - genetics
Questionnaires
Risk
Abstract
Fatty acids (FA) modulate the immune system, and it has been proposed that they affect the incidence of IgE-mediated allergic diseases. We explored the association of maternal dietary FA composition during pregnancy with the risk of asthma in the offspring.
We analyzed data from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Nutrition Study. Maternal dietary intake during pregnancy (8th month) was assessed by a validated 181-item food frequency questionnaire. The occurrence of asthma was assessed at the age of 5 yr with a questionnaire modified from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). Cox proportional hazards regression was used for the statistical analyses.
Low maternal intakes of a-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) [lowest quarter vs. mid-half HR 1.67 (95% CI 1.12-2.48)] and total n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) [HR 1.66 (95% CI 1.11-2.48)] during pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of asthma in the offspring, while a low intake of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) [HR 0.52 (95% CI 0.32-0.84)] and high intake of total saturated fatty acids [highest quarter vs. mid-half HR 0.55 (95% CI 0.34-0.90)] and palmitic acid (16:0) [HR 0.51 (95% CI 0.31-0.83)] were associated with a decreased risk of asthma. The ratios of n-6 to n-3-PUFA and 18:2n-6 to 18:3n-3, and the maternal intake of oils, fish and fish products, showed no association with the risk of asthma. The associations found were independent of several perinatal and clinical confounders.
Maternal intake of FA during pregnancy was associated with childhood asthma. Maternal a-linolenic acid, total n-3 PUFA and palmitic acid intake may decrease, while arachidonic acid intake may increase the risk of asthma in the offspring.
PubMed ID
21929596 View in PubMed
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Food consumption and risk of childhood asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276852
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2015 Dec;26(8):789-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Mirka Lumia
Hanna-Mari Takkinen
Päivi Luukkainen
Minna Kaila
Susanna Lehtinen-Jacks
Bright I Nwaru
Jetta Tuokkola
Onni Niemelä
Anna-Maija Haapala
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Riitta Veijola
Suvi M Virtanen
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2015 Dec;26(8):789-96
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Asthma - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cattle
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet
Fatty Acids, Omega-3
Female
Finland
Food - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Milk
Risk
Abstract
The consumption of foods rich in n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids has been proposed to protect against childhood asthma. This study explores the association of food consumption (including cow's milk (CM)-free diet) in early life and the risk of atopic and non-atopic asthma.
Food intake of 182 children with asthma and 728 matched controls was measured using 3-day food records, within the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Nutrition Study cohort. The diagnoses of food allergies came both from the written questionnaire and from the registers of the Social Insurance Institution. Conditional logistic regression with generalized estimating equations framework was used in the analyses.
The diagnosis of cow's milk allergy (CMA) led to multiple dietary restrictions still evident at 4 yr of age. Even after adjusting for CMA, higher consumption of CM products was inversely associated with the risk of atopic asthma and higher consumption of breast milk and oats inversely with the risk of non-atopic asthma. Early consumption of fish was associated with a decreased risk of all asthma.
Dietary intake in early life combined with atopy history has a clear impact on the risk of developing asthma. Our results indicate that CM restriction due to CMA significantly increases and mediates the association between food consumption and childhood asthma risk.
PubMed ID
25693000 View in PubMed
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Maternal dietary folate, folic acid and vitamin D intakes during pregnancy and lactation and the risk of cows' milk allergy in the offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282824
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Aug;116(4):710-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2016
Author
Jetta Tuokkola
Päivi Luukkainen
Minna Kaila
Hanna-Mari Takkinen
Sari Niinistö
Riitta Veijola
Lauri J Virta
Mikael Knip
Olli Simell
Jorma Ilonen
Suvi M Virtanen
Source
Br J Nutr. 2016 Aug;116(4):710-8
Date
Aug-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child, Preschool
Diet
Diet Surveys
Eating - physiology
Female
Finland
Folic Acid - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lactation - physiology
Male
Milk Hypersensitivity - etiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Maternal nutrient intake during pregnancy and lactation potentially influences the development of allergic diseases. Cows' milk allergy (CMA) is often the first manifestation of atopic diseases, but the impact of early nutritional influences on CMA has not been explored. The associations between maternal intakes of folate, folic acid and vitamin D during pregnancy and lactation were addressed in a prospective, population-based birth cohort within the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study. Mothers of 4921 children during pregnancy and 2940 children during lactation provided information on maternal dietary intake during the 8th month of pregnancy and the 3rd month of lactation using a detailed, validated FFQ. Information on diagnosed CMA in the offspring was obtained from a medical registry as well as queried from the parents. The Finnish food composition database was used to calculate nutrient intake. Logistic regression was applied for statistical analyses. Folate intake and folic acid and vitamin D supplement use were associated with an increased risk of CMA in the offspring, whereas vitamin D intake from foods during pregnancy was associated with a decreased risk of CMA. Thus, maternal nutrient intake during pregnancy and lactation may affect the development of CMA in offspring. Supplementation with folic acid may not be beneficial in terms of CMA development, especially in children of allergic mothers. The association between dietary supplement use and CMA risk can at least partly be explained by increased health-seeking behaviour among more educated mothers who also use more dietary supplements.
PubMed ID
27350011 View in PubMed
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Maternal diet during lactation and allergic sensitization in the offspring at age of 5.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99681
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011 Jan 12;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-2011
Author
Bright I Nwaru
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Suvi Ahonen
Minna Kaila
Mirka Lumia
Marianne Prasad
Anna-Maija Haapala
Carina Kronberg-Kippilä
Riitta Veijola
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere Division of Nutrition, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki Tampere University Hospital Research Unit, Tampere Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere Nutrition Unit, Department of Lifestyle and Participation, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki Center for Laboratory Medicine, Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu Immunogenetics Laboratory, University of Turku, Turku Department of Clinical Microbiology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio Department of Pediatrics, University of Turku, Turku Hospital for Children and Adolescents and Folkhälsan Research Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2011 Jan 12;
Date
Jan-12-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
To cite this article: Nwaru BI, Erkkola M, Ahonen S, Kaila M, Lumia M, Prasad M, Haapala A-Maija, Kronberg-Kippilä C, Veijola R, Ilonen J, Simell O, Knip M, Virtanen SM. Maternal diet during lactation and allergic sensitization in the offspring at age 5 years.Pediatric Allergy Immunology 2011. ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to examine the effect of maternal dietary intake during lactation on allergic sensitization at the age of 5 in children carrying HLA-DQB1-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. We analyzed data for 652 consecutively born children with complete information on maternal diet and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) measurements who are participating in the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Nutrition and allergy study. Analysis was performed using logistic regression. In models that included the significant uncorrelated dietary variables, maternal intake of butters and saturated fatty acids was associated with increased risk, while margarine was associated with a decreased risk, of sensitization to wheat allergen in the offspring. Maternal intake of potatoes, milks, and margarine and low-fat spreads were associated with decreased risk of sensitization to birch allergen. On the other hand, intake of potatoes decreased the risk, while vitamin C and eggs increased the risk, of cat allergic sensitization. Maternal intake of butters and saturated fatty acids during lactation may increase the risk, while margarines may decrease the risk, of sensitization to wheat allergen in the offspring. Maternal intake of potatoes, milks, and margarines may decrease the risk of sensitization to birch allergen. On the other hand, intake of potatoes may decrease the risk, while vitamin C and eggs may increase the risk, of cat allergic sensitization. These effects may persist regardless of maternal or parental allergic status.
PubMed ID
21223376 View in PubMed
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Maternal diet during pregnancy and allergic sensitization in the offspring by 5 yrs of age: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146758
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2010 Feb;21(1 Pt 1):29-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Bright I Nwaru
Suvi Ahonen
Minna Kaila
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Anna-Maija Haapala
Carina Kronberg-Kippilä
Riitta Veijola
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. bright.nwaru@uta.fi
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2010 Feb;21(1 Pt 1):29-37
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - immunology
Animals
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - immunology
Diet
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Fruit - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - immunology
Abstract
To examine the effect of maternal diet during pregnancy on allergic sensitization in the offspring by 5 yrs of age. The Finnish type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Nutrition Study. A population-based cohort study with 5-yr follow-up. A total of 931 children with human leukocyte antigen-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes for whom maternal pregnancy food frequency questionnaire data and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E measurement at 5 yrs were available. Increasing maternal consumption of citrus fruits [odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05-1.25] and total fruit (OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.09-1.70) were positively associated with sensitization to inhalant allergens, after adjustment for potential confounders. Maternal intake of vitamin D (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.35-0.91) was inversely associated with sensitization to food allergens. Maternal consumption of citrus fruits during pregnancy may increase the risk to allergic sensitization in the offspring, whereas vitamin D intake may have a beneficial effect. Further studies are required to define more closely the putative effect of maternal intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids on development of allergic diseases in the offspring.
PubMed ID
20003068 View in PubMed
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Maternal intake of fatty acids during pregnancy and allergies in the offspring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129802
Source
Br J Nutr. 2012 Aug;108(4):720-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Bright I Nwaru
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Mirka Lumia
Carina Kronberg-Kippilä
Suvi Ahonen
Minna Kaila
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Riitta Veijola
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. bright.nwaru@uta.fi
Source
Br J Nutr. 2012 Aug;108(4):720-32
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Butter - adverse effects
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Fatty Acids, Omega-6 - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Incidence
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
alpha-Linolenic Acid - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
Fatty acids (FA) are known to have a number of immunological effects and, accordingly, may play a role in the development of allergic diseases. We investigated the effect of maternal intake of FA during pregnancy on the risk of allergic rhinitis, wheeze and atopic eczema in children aged 5 years. The present study analysed data from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Nutrition Study, a population-based birth cohort study with a 5-year follow-up. Complete information on maternal diet (assessed by a validated FFQ) and International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood-based allergic outcomes was available for 2441 children. Cox proportional regression and logistic regression were used for the analyses. After adjusting for potential confounding variables, high maternal consumption of butter and butter spreads (hazard ratio (HR) 1.33; 95 % CI 1.03, 1.71) and higher ratio of n-6:n-3 FA (HR 1.37; 95 % CI 1.07, 1.77) during pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of allergic rhinitis in the offspring by 5 years of age. High maternal intakes of total PUFA (HR 0.71; 95 % CI 0.52, 0.96) and a-linolenic FA (HR 0.73; 95 % CI 0.54, 0.98) were associated with a decreased risk of allergic rhinitis. However, these results lost their significance after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Overall, our data suggest that maternal consumption of butter, the ratio of n-6:n-3 FA and intake of PUFA and a-linolenic FA during pregnancy may be potential determinants of allergic rhinitis in the offspring.
PubMed ID
22067943 View in PubMed
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Microbial exposure in infancy and subsequent appearance of type 1 diabetes mellitus-associated autoantibodies: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258815
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Aug;168(8):755-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Suvi M Virtanen
Hanna-Mari Takkinen
Bright I Nwaru
Minna Kaila
Suvi Ahonen
Jaakko Nevalainen
Sari Niinistö
Heli Siljander
Olli Simell
Jorma Ilonen
Heikki Hyöty
Riitta Veijola
Mikael Knip
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Aug;168(8):755-63
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Infective Agents - adverse effects
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmunity
Cats
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Dogs
Environmental Exposure
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA Antigens - genetics
Humans
Hygiene
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Islets of Langerhans - immunology
Male
Microbiota
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Abstract
The role of microbial exposure during early life in the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus is unclear.
To investigate whether animal contact and other microbial exposures during infancy are associated with the development of preclinical and clinical type 1 diabetes.
A birth cohort of children with HLA antigen-DQB1-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes was examined. Participants included 3143 consecutively born children at 2 hospitals in Finland between 1996 and 2004.
The following exposures during the first year of life were assessed: indoor and outdoor dogs and cats, farm animals, farming, visit to a stable, day care, and exposure to antibiotics during the first week of life.
Clinical and preclinical type 1 diabetes were used as outcomes. The latter was defined as repeated positivity for islet-cell antibodies plus for at least 1 of 3 other diabetes-associated autoantibodies analyzed and/or clinical type 1 diabetes. The autoantibodies were analyzed at 3- to 12-month intervals since the birth of the child.
Children exposed to an indoor dog, compared with otherwise similar children without an indoor dog exposure, had a reduced odds of developing preclinical type 1 diabetes (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.47; 95% CI, 0.28-0.80; P?=?.005) and clinical type 1 diabetes (adjusted OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.14-1.14; P?=?.08). All of the other microbial exposures studied were not associated with preclinical or clinical diabetes: the odds ratios ranged from 0.74 to 1.58.
Among the 9 early microbial exposures studied, only the indoor dog exposure during the first year of life was inversely associated with the development of preclinical type 1 diabetes. This finding needs to be confirmed in other populations.
PubMed ID
24957949 View in PubMed
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Risk of asthma and allergic outcomes in the offspring in relation to maternal food consumption during pregnancy: a Finnish birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126003
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2012 Mar;23(2):186-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Bright I Nwaru
Minna Kaila
Carina Kronberg-Kippilä
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Riitta Veijola
Mikael Knip
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, Department of Food and Environmental Sciences, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. maijaliisa.erkkola@helsinki.fi
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2012 Mar;23(2):186-94
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Incidence
Male
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - immunology
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - immunology
Risk factors
Abstract
Epidemiological and immunological studies suggest that maternal diet during pregnancy might affect the development of allergic diseases in the offspring. The authors set out to study the effect of maternal food consumption during pregnancy on the emergence of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC)-based allergic outcomes: asthma, allergic rhinitis, and wheeze by the 5 yr of age.
Data from 2441 children at 5 yr of age were analyzed within the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Nutrition Study, a population-based birth cohort study. Maternal diet was assessed with a validated food frequency questionnaire.
In multiple regression models adjusted for known confounders, low maternal consumption of leafy vegetables (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.21, 1.98), malaceous fruits (aOR: 1.45; 95% CI: 1.15, 1.84), and chocolate (aOR: 1.36; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.70) were positively associated with the risk of wheeze in children. High maternal consumption of fruit and berry juices was positively associated with the risk of allergic rhinitis (aOR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.90) in children. No associations were observed between maternal food consumption and asthma.
Development of allergic diseases in preschool children may be influenced by intrauterine exposure to maternal diet.
PubMed ID
22432883 View in PubMed
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Validation of the Finnish ISAAC questionnaire on asthma against anti-asthmatic medication reimbursement database in 5-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101357
Source
Clin Respir J. 2010 Sep 1;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2010
Author
Bright Ibeabughichi Nwaru
Mirka Lumia
Minna Kaila
Päivi Luukkainen
Heli Tapanainen
Maijaliisa Erkkola
Suvi Ahonen
Juha Pekkanen
Timo Klaukka
Riitta Veijola
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Suvi Mirjami Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland Nutrition Unit, Department of Lifestyle and Participation, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland Division of Nutrition, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Tampere University Hospital Research Unit, Tampere, Finland National Institute for Health and Welfare, Kuopio, Finland School of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland Department of Pediatrics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
Clin Respir J. 2010 Sep 1;
Date
Sep-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background: Valid identification of childhood asthma at the population level for epidemiological purposes remains a challenge. We aimed at validating the Finnish version of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire based on parental-reported childhood asthma. Materials and Methods: The ISAAC questionnaire has been validated against anti-asthmatic medication reimbursement data of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution, being the gold standard, among 2236 5-year-old consecutively born children (1996-2004) carrying human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-conferred susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. Two combined questionnaire questions (any wheezing symptom or use of asthma medication during the preceding 12 months plus ever asthma; any wheezing symptom or use of asthma medication during the preceding 12 months plus ever doctor-diagnosed asthma) were validated against valid reimbursement with purchase of at least one anti-asthmatic medication during a 12-month period. The validity of the questionnaire was estimated as the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and Youden's index. Results: The sensitivity 0.98 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.92-0.99]; specificity 0.98 (95% CI = 0.97-0.98); negative predictive value 1.00 (95% CI = 1.00-1.00); and Youden's index 0.96 (95% CI = 0.96-0.96) were the same for each of the two sets of combined questions. The positive predictive value for the first combined question was 0.63 (95% CI = 0.55-0.71), while it was 0.64 (95% CI = 0.57-0.72) for the second combined question. Conclusion: The Finnish ISAAC questionnaire was highly valid and is an acceptable instrument for the survey of the prevalence of parental-reported childhood asthma for epidemiological purposes. Please cite this paper as: Nwaru BI, Lumia M, Kaila M, Luukkainen P, Tapanainen H, Erkkola M, Ahonen S, Pekkanen J, Klaukka T, Veijola R, Simell O, Knip M and Virtanen SM. Validation of the Finnish ISAAC questionnaire on asthma against anti-asthmatic medication reimbursement database in 5-year-old children. Clin Respir J 2010; DOI:10.1111/j.1752-699X.2010.00222.x.
PubMed ID
21801323 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.