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Age at menarche in the Canadian population: secular trends and relationship to adulthood BMI.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154086
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2008 Dec;43(6):548-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
M Anne Harris
Jerilynn C Prior
Mieke Koehoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. aharris7@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2008 Dec;43(6):548-54
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Menarche
Young Adult
Abstract
Studies from around the world indicate a trend toward younger ages of menarche. The extent of this trend in the Canadian population is unknown, and the relationship to later-life health indicators has not yet been fully elucidated. The objective of this study is to estimate the trend in age at menarche (AAM) in the Canadian population and evaluate the relationship between AAM and adult body mass index (BMI).
Our data source was a nationally representative survey (the Canadian Community Health Survey, 2.2), and analyses included 8080 women, aged 15 and older, who self-reported AAM. Height and weight were measured by the interviewers for the calculation of current BMI. We modeled the secular trend in AAM over time, and the relationship between current BMI and AAM.
We found a statistically significant decline in AAM in successive age cohorts, indicating a 0.73-year (8.8-month) decrease in AAM between the oldest and youngest age cohorts in the sample. A 1-year increase in AAM was associated with a decrease in mean BMI of approximately 0.5 kg/m(2), after adjustment for covariates. A current age-AAM interaction term was nonsignificant, indicating that the relationship was stable throughout increasing temporal separation from puberty.
The observed trend toward earlier menarche could be an indicator of a change in insulin-related metabolism, possibly mediated by behavioral and environmental variables. This study suggests that AAM may be an important clinical and public health indicator of susceptibility to overweight and obesity and attendant morbidity.
Notes
Comment In: J Adolesc Health. 2008 Dec;43(6):525-619027638
PubMed ID
19027642 View in PubMed
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Association between cumulative joint loading from occupational activities and knee osteoarthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114531
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1634-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Allison M Ezzat
Jolanda Cibere
Mieke Koehoorn
Linda C Li
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Oct;65(10):1634-42
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthralgia - etiology - physiopathology
Biomechanical Phenomena
British Columbia
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Knee Joint - physiopathology
Logistic Models
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Health
Odds Ratio
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Pain Measurement
Risk factors
Time Factors
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
To determine the associations between cumulative occupational physical load (COPL) and 3 definitions of knee osteoarthritis (OA).
Cross-sectional analyses were performed from 2 population-based cohorts (n = 327). Eligible symptomatic participants were those with pain, aching, or discomfort in or around the knee on most days of a month at any time in the past and any pain in the past 12 months. Asymptomatic participants responded "no" to both knee pain questions. Self-reported COPL was calculated over each participant's lifetime and then categorized into quarters (QCOPL). Radiographic OA (ROA) and symptomatic OA (SOA) were defined by Kellgren/Lawrence grade =2, with SOA also including pain. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) OA was defined using criteria by Hunter et al. Logistic regression, adjusted with population weights, examined the associations between QCOPL and each of ROA, SOA, and MRI-OA after controlling for covariates and two-way interactions.
Participants had a mean ± SD age of 58.5 ± 11.0 years and a mean ± SD body mass index of 26.3 ± 4.7 kg/m(2) . Of those, 109 (33.3%) had ROA, 102 (31.2%) had SOA, and 131 (40.1%) had MRI-OA. Compared with QCOPL-1, increased odds of ROA were found for QCOPL-4 (odds ratio [OR] 3.15, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.02-9.70) and QCOPL-3 (OR 4.19, 95% CI 1.55-11.34). Statistically significant relationships were found in SOA (QCOPL-4: OR 8.16, 95% CI 1.89-35.27; QCOPL-3: OR 5.73, 95% CI 1.36-24.12) and MRI-OA (QCOPL-4: OR 9.54, 95% CI 2.65-34.27; QCOPL-3: OR 9.04, 95% CI 2.65-30.88; QCOPL-2: OR 7.18, 95% CI 2.17-23.70).
Occupational activity is associated with knee OA, with dose-response relationships observed in SOA and MRI-OA.
PubMed ID
23609965 View in PubMed
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Association of long-term exposure to community noise and traffic-related air pollution with coronary heart disease mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125348
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 May 1;175(9):898-906
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2012
Author
Wen Qi Gan
Hugh W Davies
Mieke Koehoorn
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 May 1;175(9):898-906
Date
May-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise - adverse effects
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
In metropolitan areas, road traffic is a major contributor to ambient air pollution and the dominant source of community noise. The authors investigated the independent and joint influences of community noise and traffic-related air pollution on risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in a population-based cohort study with a 5-year exposure period (January 1994-December 1998) and a 4-year follow-up period (January 1999-December 2002). Individuals who were 45-85 years of age and resided in metropolitan Vancouver, Canada, during the exposure period and did not have known CHD at baseline were included (n = 445,868). Individual exposures to community noise and traffic-related air pollutants, including black carbon, particulate matter less than or equal to 2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter, nitrogen dioxide, and nitric oxide, were estimated at each person's residence using a noise prediction model and land-use regression models, respectively. CHD deaths were identified from the provincial death registration database. After adjustment for potential confounders, including traffic-related air pollutants or noise, elevations in noise and black carbon equal to the interquartile ranges were associated with 6% (95% confidence interval: 1, 11) and 4% (95% confidence interval: 1, 8) increases, respectively, in CHD mortality. Subjects in the highest noise decile had a 22% (95% confidence interval: 4, 43) increase in CHD mortality compared with persons in the lowest decile. These findings suggest that there are independent effects of traffic-related noise and air pollution on CHD mortality.
PubMed ID
22491084 View in PubMed
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Barriers to STI testing among youth in a Canadian oil and gas community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159499
Source
Health Place. 2008 Dec;14(4):718-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Shira Goldenberg
Jean Shoveller
Mieke Koehoorn
Aleck Ostry
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. shiragol@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Health Place. 2008 Dec;14(4):718-29
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia
Female
Fossil Fuels
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Industry
Male
Mass Screening - utilization
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - diagnosis
Abstract
Northeastern British Columbia, Canada, is undergoing in-migration of young people attracted by jobs in the oil/gas sectors. Chlamydia rates among youth ages 15-24 are increasing and exceed the provincial average by 22%. Testing for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) reduces the disease burden, contributing to prevention. We conducted ethnographic fieldwork, including interviews with 25 youth and 14 service providers, to document their perceptions regarding youth's access to STI testing. Five key barriers to access were identified: limited opportunities for access, geographic inaccessibility, local social norms, limited information, and negative interactions with providers. To address youths' needs, we recommend active STI prevention and testing service delivery models that incorporate a locally tailored public awareness campaign, outreach to oil/gas workers, condom distribution, expanded clinic hours and drop-in STI testing, specialized training for health care providers, and inter-sectoral partnerships between public health, non-profit organizations, and industry.
PubMed ID
18171632 View in PubMed
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Changes in residential proximity to road traffic and the risk of death from coronary heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142555
Source
Epidemiology. 2010 Sep;21(5):642-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Wen Qi Gan
Lillian Tamburic
Hugh W Davies
Paul A Demers
Mieke Koehoorn
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Epidemiology. 2010 Sep;21(5):642-9
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Dibutyl Phthalate
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Vehicles - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Residential proximity to road traffic is associated with increased coronary heart disease (CHD) morbidity and mortality. It is unknown, however, whether changes in residential proximity to traffic could alter the risk of CHD mortality.
We used a population-based cohort study with a 5-year exposure period and a 4-year follow-up period to explore the association between changes in residential proximity to road traffic and the risk of CHD mortality. The cohort comprised all residents aged 45-85 years who resided in metropolitan Vancouver during the exposure period and without known CHD at baseline (n = 450,283). Residential proximity to traffic was estimated using a geographic information system. CHD deaths during the follow-up period were identified using provincial death registration database. The data were analyzed using logistic regression.
Compared with the subjects consistently living away from road traffic (>150 m from a highway or >50 m from a major road) during the 9-year study period, those consistently living close to traffic (
PubMed ID
20585255 View in PubMed
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Characterizing violence in health care in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150574
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Aug;65(8):1655-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Rakel N Kling
Annalee Yassi
Elizabeth Smailes
Chris Y Lovato
Mieke Koehoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. rkling@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Aug;65(8):1655-63
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Health Care Sector - statistics & numerical data
Health Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk Management - statistics & numerical data
Violence - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The high rate of violence in the healthcare sector supports the need for greater surveillance efforts.
The purpose of this study was to use a province-wide workplace incident reporting system to calculate rates and identify risk factors for violence in the British Columbia healthcare industry by occupational groups, including nursing.
Data were extracted for a 1-year period (2004-2005) from the Workplace Health Indicator Tracking and Evaluation database for all employee reports of violence incidents for four of the six British Columbia health authorities. Risk factors for violence were identified through comparisons of incident rates (number of incidents/100,000 worked hours) by work characteristics, including nursing occupations and work units, and by regression models adjusted for demographic factors.
Across health authorities, three groups at particularly high risk for violence were identified: very small healthcare facilities [rate ratios (RR) = 6.58, 95% CI =3.49, 12.41], the care aide occupation (RR = 10.05, 95% CI = 6.72, 15.05), and paediatric departments in acute care hospitals (RR = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.05, 4.67).
The three high-risk groups warrant targeted prevention or intervention efforts be implemented. The identification of high-risk groups supports the importance of a province-wide surveillance system for public health planning.
PubMed ID
19493143 View in PubMed
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A cohort study of traffic-related air pollution impacts on birth outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157243
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2008 May;116(5):680-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Michael Brauer
Cornel Lencar
Lillian Tamburic
Mieke Koehoorn
Paul Demers
Catherine Karr
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, The University of British Columbia, 2206 East Mall, Vancouver BC V6T1Z3 Canada. brauer@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2008 May;116(5):680-6
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Birth weight
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Evidence suggests that air pollution exposure adversely affects pregnancy outcomes. Few studies have examined individual-level intraurban exposure contrasts.
We evaluated the impacts of air pollution on small for gestational age (SGA) birth weight, low full-term birth weight (LBW), and preterm birth using spatiotemporal exposure metrics.
With linked administrative data, we identified 70,249 singleton births (1999-2002) with complete covariate data (sex, ethnicity, parity, birth month and year, income, education) and maternal residential history in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. We estimated residential exposures by month of pregnancy using nearest and inverse-distance weighting (IDW) of study area monitors [carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter
Notes
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Erratum In: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Dec;116(12):A519
PubMed ID
18470315 View in PubMed
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Consultation with health care professionals and influenza immunization among women in contact with young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144480
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Catharine T Chambers
Jane A Buxton
Mieke Koehoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2010 Jan-Feb;101(1):15-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Influenza Vaccines
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Logistic Models
Mass Vaccination
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Professional-Patient Relations
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Primary health providers serve an important role in providing and promoting annual influenza immunization to high-risk groups and their close contacts. The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether consultation with a medical professional increases the likelihood of receiving a flu shot among women who have given birth in the past five years and to determine whether this association differs by type of medical professional.
Data were obtained from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2005), Cycle 3.1. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between receiving a flu shot in the past 12 months and consulting with family doctors, specialists, nurses, chiropractors, or homeopaths/naturopaths.
Among the 6,925 women included in our sample, 1,847 (28.4%) reported receiving a flu shot in the past 12 months. After adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics and province of residence, women who received flu shots in the past 12 months were significantly more likely to consult with a family doctor (AOR 1.56, 95% CI 1.34-1.83) and significantly less likely to consult with a chiropractor (AOR 0.76, 95% CI 0.64-0.90) or a homeopath/naturopath (AOR 0.72, 95% CI 0.54-0.97) over the same time period.
Consultation with family doctors was found to have the strongest association with annual flu shots among women in contact with young children, whereas consultation with alternative care providers was found to have an independent inverse association. Given the influenza-associated health risks for young children, medical professionals should promote immunization at the time of consultation for household contacts of young children, including pregnant women.
PubMed ID
20364531 View in PubMed
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Costs and compensation of work-related injuries in British Columbia sawmills.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166955
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2007 Mar;64(3):196-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Hasanat Alamgir
Emile Tompa
Mieke Koehoorn
Aleck Ostry
Paul A Demers
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, 5804, Fairview Avenue, Vanconver, British Columbia, Canada V6T123. hasanat@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2007 Mar;64(3):196-201
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - economics
British Columbia
Costs and Cost Analysis
Forestry - economics - statistics & numerical data
Hospitalization
Humans
Workers' Compensation - economics
Abstract
To estimate the costs of work-related injury in a cohort of sawmill workers in British Columbia from the perspective of the workers' compensation system.
Hospital discharge records were extracted from 1989 to 1998 for a cohort of 5786 actively employed sawmill workers. A total of 173 work-related injury cases were identified from these records using the International classification of diseases-ninth revision (ICD-9) external cause of injury codes and the responsibility of payment schedule. Workers' compensation records were extracted and matched with hospital records by dates and ICD-9 diagnosis codes. All costs were converted into 1995 constant Canadian dollars using the Provincial General Consumer Price Index for the non-healthcare costs and Medical Consumer Price Index for the healthcare costs. A 5% discounting rate was applied to adjust for the time value of money. For the uncompensated cases, costs were imputed from the compensated cases using the median cost for a similar nature of injury.
370 hospitalisation events due to injury were captured, and by either of the two indicators (E Codes or payment schedules), 173 (47%) hospitalisation events due to injury, were identified as work related. The median healthcare cost was 4377 dollars and the median non-healthcare cost was 16,559 dollars for a work-related injury. The median non-healthcare and healthcare costs by injury were falls, 19,978 dollars and 5185 dollars; struck by falling object, 32,398 dollars and 8625 dollars; struck against, 12,667 dollars and 5741 dollars; machinery related, 26,480 dollars and 6643 dollars; caught in or between, 24,130 dollars and 4389 dollars; and overexertion, 7801 dollars and 2710 dollars. The total cost was 10,374,115 dollars for non-healthcare and 1,764,137 dollars for healthcare. The compensation agency did not compensate 874,871 dollars (8.4%) of the non-healthcare costs and 200,588 dollars (11.4%) of the healthcare costs.
Eliminating avoidable work-related injury events can save valuable resources.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17053018 View in PubMed
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Descriptive epidemiological features of bronchiolitis in a population-based cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153946
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Dec;122(6):1196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Mieke Koehoorn
Catherine J Karr
Paul A Demers
Cornel Lencar
Lillian Tamburic
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, 5804 Fairview Ave, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6T 1Z3. mieke.koehoorn@ubc.ca
Source
Pediatrics. 2008 Dec;122(6):1196-203
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Breast Feeding
British Columbia - epidemiology
Bronchiolitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The goal was to investigate the epidemiological features of incident bronchiolitis by using a population-based infant cohort.
Outpatient and inpatient health records were used to identify incident bronchiolitis cases among 93,058 singleton infants born in the Georgia Air Basin between 1999 and 2002. Additional health-related databases were linked to provide data on sociodemographic variables, maternal characteristics, and birth outcome measures.
From 1999 to 2002, bronchiolitis accounted for 12,474 incident health care encounters (inpatient or outpatient contacts) during the first year of life (134.2 cases per 1000 person-years). A total of 1588 hospitalized bronchiolitis cases were identified (17.1 cases per 1000 person-years). Adjusted Cox proportional-hazard analyses for both case definitions indicated an increased risk of incident bronchiolitis in the first year of life (follow-up period: 2-12 months) for boys, infants of First Nations status, infants with older siblings, and infants living in neighborhoods with smaller proportions of maternal postsecondary education. The risk also was elevated for infants born to young mothers (
PubMed ID
19047234 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.