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Climate-sensitive health priorities in Nunatsiavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264176
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):605
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sherilee L Harper
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
Michele Wood
Scott A McEwen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15(1):605
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This exploratory study used participatory methods to identify, characterize, and rank climate-sensitive health priorities in Nunatsiavut, Labrador, Canada.
A mixed method study design was used and involved collecting both qualitative and quantitative data at regional, community, and individual levels. In-depth interviews with regional health representatives were conducted throughout Nunatsiavut (n?=?11). In addition, three PhotoVoice workshops were held with Rigolet community members (n?=?11), where participants took photos of areas, items, or concepts that expressed how climate change is impacting their health. The workshop groups shared their photographs, discussed the stories and messages behind them, and then grouped photos into re-occurring themes. Two community surveys were administered in Rigolet to capture data on observed climatic and environmental changes in the area, and perceived impacts on health, wellbeing, and lifestyles (n?=?187).
Climate-sensitive health pathways were described in terms of inter-relationships between environmental and social determinants of Inuit health. The climate-sensitive health priorities for the region included food security, water security, mental health and wellbeing, new hazards and safety concerns, and health services and delivery.
The results highlight several climate-sensitive health priorities that are specific to the Nunatsiavut region, and suggest approaching health research and adaptation planning from an EcoHealth perspective.
PubMed ID
26135309 View in PubMed
Less detail

The hidden costs: Identification of indirect costs associated with acute gastrointestinal illness in an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294164
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Nia King
Rachael Vriezen
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Michele Wood
Sherilee Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost Allocation
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - economics
Abstract
Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) incidence and per-capita healthcare expenditures are higher in some Inuit communities as compared to elsewhere in Canada. Consequently, there is a demand for strategies that will reduce the individual-level costs of AGI; this will require a comprehensive understanding of the economic costs of AGI. However, given Inuit communities' unique cultural, economic, and geographic contexts, there is a knowledge gap regarding the context-specific indirect costs of AGI borne by Inuit community members. This study aimed to identify the major indirect costs of AGI, and explore factors associated with these indirect costs, in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Canada, in order to develop a case-based context-specific study framework that can be used to evaluate these costs.
A mixed methods study design and community-based methods were used. Qualitative in-depth, group, and case interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis to identify and describe indirect costs of AGI specific to Rigolet. Data from two quantitative cross-sectional retrospective surveys were analyzed using univariable regression models to examine potential associations between predictor variables and the indirect costs.
The most notable indirect costs of AGI that should be incorporated into cost-of-illness evaluations were the tangible costs related to missing paid employment and subsistence activities, as well as the intangible costs associated with missing community and cultural events. Seasonal cost variations should also be considered. This study was intended to inform cost-of-illness studies conducted in Rigolet and other similar research settings. These results contribute to a better understanding of the economic impacts of AGI on Rigolet residents, which could be used to help identify priority areas and resource allocation for public health policies and programs.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Sep;62(3):228-41 PMID 14594198
Cites: Risk Anal. 2010 May;30(5):782-97 PMID 19765248
Cites: J Food Prot. 2015 Jun;78(6):1064-71 PMID 26038894
Cites: J Food Prot. 2006 Mar;69(3):651-9 PMID 16541699
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-61 PMID 21560272
Cites: Ecohealth. 2011 Mar;8(1):93-108 PMID 21785890
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2016 Jan;144(2):241-6 PMID 26095130
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S45-61 PMID 16078555
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2004 Apr;132(2):211-21 PMID 15061495
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Oct;69(8):1194-203 PMID 19700231
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2011 Jan;72(2):185-92 PMID 21146909
Cites: J Food Prot. 2012 Jul;75(7):1292-302 PMID 22980013
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85 PMID 19577696
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):471-87 PMID 20044965
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007 Jul 18;7:162 PMID 17640371
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jul 2-8;366(9479):10-3 PMID 15993213
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2002;23:115-34 PMID 11910057
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Apr;136(4):451-60 PMID 17565767
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Jul;15(6):832-40 PMID 15961879
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006 Dec 19;6:307 PMID 17178001
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2003 Dec;45(12):1257-66 PMID 14665811
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96 Suppl 3:S32-6, S36-41 PMID 16042162
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31 PMID 17319086
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47 PMID 22595069
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2007 Nov;135(8):1290-8 PMID 17313694
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 May 21;74:26290 PMID 26001982
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2007 May 1;195 Suppl 1:S36-S44 PMID 17539193
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1996 Aug;43(3):281-90 PMID 8844931
Cites: Health Rep. 2005 May;16(3):47-51 PMID 15971515
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Sep 30;127(1-2):43-52 PMID 18649966
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2013 Mar;38(3):300-5 PMID 23537022
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 1997 May;5(2):59-63 PMID 9444122
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-14 PMID 21041430
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):38-45 PMID 15776991
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-75 PMID 19577695
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Feb;126:86-98 PMID 25528558
Cites: Ecohealth. 2012 Mar;9(1):89-101 PMID 22526749
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015 Jul 02;15:605 PMID 26135309
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Dec;125(3):505-22 PMID 11218201
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Sep;141:133-41 PMID 26275362
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 May 26;14:509 PMID 24885154
Cites: J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2003 Mar;18(3):322-8 PMID 12603534
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Oct;143(14):3048-63 PMID 25697261
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-62 PMID 8557942
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1998 Aug;28(2):345-52 PMID 9725732
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 15;17 (1):578 PMID 28619039
Cites: Nurse Res. 2006 Jul 1;13(4):84 PMID 27702218
Cites: Malar J. 2011 Feb 08;10:32 PMID 21303538
PubMed ID
29768456 View in PubMed
Less detail

The hidden costs: Identification of indirect costs associated with acute gastrointestinal illness in an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291798
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Nia King
Rachael Vriezen
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Michele Wood
Sherilee Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(5):e0196990
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) incidence and per-capita healthcare expenditures are higher in some Inuit communities as compared to elsewhere in Canada. Consequently, there is a demand for strategies that will reduce the individual-level costs of AGI; this will require a comprehensive understanding of the economic costs of AGI. However, given Inuit communities' unique cultural, economic, and geographic contexts, there is a knowledge gap regarding the context-specific indirect costs of AGI borne by Inuit community members. This study aimed to identify the major indirect costs of AGI, and explore factors associated with these indirect costs, in the Inuit community of Rigolet, Canada, in order to develop a case-based context-specific study framework that can be used to evaluate these costs.
A mixed methods study design and community-based methods were used. Qualitative in-depth, group, and case interviews were analyzed using thematic analysis to identify and describe indirect costs of AGI specific to Rigolet. Data from two quantitative cross-sectional retrospective surveys were analyzed using univariable regression models to examine potential associations between predictor variables and the indirect costs.
The most notable indirect costs of AGI that should be incorporated into cost-of-illness evaluations were the tangible costs related to missing paid employment and subsistence activities, as well as the intangible costs associated with missing community and cultural events. Seasonal cost variations should also be considered. This study was intended to inform cost-of-illness studies conducted in Rigolet and other similar research settings. These results contribute to a better understanding of the economic impacts of AGI on Rigolet residents, which could be used to help identify priority areas and resource allocation for public health policies and programs.
Notes
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Sep;62(3):228-41 PMID 14594198
Cites: Risk Anal. 2010 May;30(5):782-97 PMID 19765248
Cites: J Food Prot. 2015 Jun;78(6):1064-71 PMID 26038894
Cites: J Food Prot. 2006 Mar;69(3):651-9 PMID 16541699
Cites: Geogr J. 2011;177(1):44-61 PMID 21560272
Cites: Ecohealth. 2011 Mar;8(1):93-108 PMID 21785890
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2016 Jan;144(2):241-6 PMID 26095130
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Mar-Apr;96 Suppl 2:S45-61 PMID 16078555
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2004 Apr;132(2):211-21 PMID 15061495
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2009 Oct;69(8):1194-203 PMID 19700231
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2011 Jan;72(2):185-92 PMID 21146909
Cites: J Food Prot. 2012 Jul;75(7):1292-302 PMID 22980013
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):76-85 PMID 19577696
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2009 Dec;68(5):471-87 PMID 20044965
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007 Jul 18;7:162 PMID 17640371
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Jul 2-8;366(9479):10-3 PMID 15993213
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2002;23:115-34 PMID 11910057
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2008 Apr;136(4):451-60 PMID 17565767
Cites: Qual Health Res. 2005 Jul;15(6):832-40 PMID 15961879
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006 Dec 19;6:307 PMID 17178001
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2003 Dec;45(12):1257-66 PMID 14665811
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jul-Aug;96 Suppl 3:S32-6, S36-41 PMID 16042162
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):416-31 PMID 17319086
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 Aug;75(3):538-47 PMID 22595069
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2007 Nov;135(8):1290-8 PMID 17313694
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 May 21;74:26290 PMID 26001982
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2007 May 1;195 Suppl 1:S36-S44 PMID 17539193
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1996 Aug;43(3):281-90 PMID 8844931
Cites: Health Rep. 2005 May;16(3):47-51 PMID 15971515
Cites: Int J Food Microbiol. 2008 Sep 30;127(1-2):43-52 PMID 18649966
Cites: Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2013 Mar;38(3):300-5 PMID 23537022
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 1997 May;5(2):59-63 PMID 9444122
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-14 PMID 21041430
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2005 Feb;64(1):38-45 PMID 15776991
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Jul 4;374(9683):65-75 PMID 19577695
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Feb;126:86-98 PMID 25528558
Cites: Ecohealth. 2012 Mar;9(1):89-101 PMID 22526749
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2015 Jul 02;15:605 PMID 26135309
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2000 Dec;125(3):505-22 PMID 11218201
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2015 Sep;141:133-41 PMID 26275362
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2014 May 26;14:509 PMID 24885154
Cites: J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2003 Mar;18(3):322-8 PMID 12603534
Cites: Epidemiol Infect. 2015 Oct;143(14):3048-63 PMID 25697261
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1996 Feb;96(2):155-62 PMID 8557942
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 1998 Aug;28(2):345-52 PMID 9725732
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2017 Jun 15;17 (1):578 PMID 28619039
Cites: Nurse Res. 2006 Jul 1;13(4):84 PMID 27702218
Cites: Malar J. 2011 Feb 08;10:32 PMID 21303538
PubMed ID
29768456 View in PubMed
Less detail

Inuit housing and homelessness: results from the International Polar Year Inuit Health Survey 2007-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128983
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):520-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Katherine Minich
Helga Saudny
Crystal Lennie
Michele Wood
Laakkuluk Williamson-Bathory
Zhirong Cao
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University, Ste. Anne-de-Bellevue, QC H9X 3V9, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):520-31
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Crowding
Family Relations
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Abstract
Evaluate housing characteristics across Inuit regions in Canada that participated in the 2007-2008 International Polar Year (IPY) Inuit Health Survey.
A cross-sectional Inuit Health Survey.
Housing characteristics were ascertained as part of the IPY Inuit Health Survey through interviews conducted in 33 coastal and 3 inland communities, representing all communities in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) of NWT, Nunavut and Nunatsiavut of northern Labrador. Variable descriptive statistics were weighted and presented by region and by whether children were present or not in each household.
A total of 2,796 Inuit households were approached, of which 68% participated (n=1,901 households). In ISR and Nunavut, approximately 20% of homes provided shelter to the homeless compared to 12% in Nunatsiavut (p=0.05). The prevalence of public housing and household crowding also varied by region, with Nunavut having a statistically significantly higher prevalence of crowding (30%) than Nunatsiavut (12%) and ISR (12%). Household crowding was more prevalent among homes with children. Overall, 40% of homes were in need of major repairs and problems with mould were reported in 20% of households.
Adequate shelter is a basic human need and an essential foundation for thriving population health. The results indicate that improvements in housing indicators are needed. Of utmost concern is the high prevalence of overcrowding in Inuit homes with children, which poses potential consequences for children's health and well-being. Further, the high percentage of homes providing shelter to the homeless suggests that hidden homelessness needs to be addressed by further research and program implementation.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):444-622208993
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):447-922208994
PubMed ID
22152596 View in PubMed
Less detail

Prevalence of affirmative responses to questions of food insecurity: International Polar Year Inuit Health Survey, 2007-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130409
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):488-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Renata Rosol
Catherine Huet
Michele Wood
Crystal Lennie
Geraldine Osborne
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Macdonald Campus, McGill University, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, H9X 3V9, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):488-97
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Deprivation
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Supply - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Malnutrition - ethnology - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Nutritional Status
Population Surveillance
Poverty - ethnology
Prevalence
Socioeconomic Factors
Starvation - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Assess the prevalence of food insecurity by region among Inuit households in the Canadian Arctic.
A community-participatory, cross-sectional Inuit health survey conducted through face-to-face interviews.
A quantitative household food security questionnaire was conducted with a random sample of 2,595 self-identified Inuit adults aged 18 years and older, from 36 communities located in 3 jurisdictions (Inuvialuit Settlement Region; Nunavut; Nunatsiavut Region) during the period from 2007 to 2008. Weighted prevalence of levels of adult and household food insecurity was calculated.
Differences in the prevalence of household food insecurity were noted by region, with Nunavut having the highest prevalence of food insecurity (68.8%), significantly higher than that observed in Inuvialuit Settlement Region (43.3%) and Nunatsiavut Region (45.7%) (p=0.01). Adults living in households rated as severely food insecure reported times in the past year when they or other adults in the household had skipped meals (88.6%), gone hungry (76.9%) or not eaten for a whole day (58.2%). Adults living in households rated as moderately food insecure reported times in the past year when they worried that food would run out (86.5%) and when the food did not last and there was no money to buy more (87.8%).
A high level of food insecurity was reported among Inuit adults residing in the Canadian Arctic, particularly for Nunavut. Immediate action and meaningful interventions are needed to mitigate the negative health impacts of food insecurity and ensure a healthy Inuit population.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):447-922208994
Comment In: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):444-622208993
PubMed ID
22005728 View in PubMed
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Promoting Inuit health through a participatory whiteboard video.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299525
Source
Can J Public Health. 2019 Apr 25; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-25-2019
Author
Manpreet Saini
Steven Roche
Andrew Papadopoulos
Nicole Markwick
Inez Shiwak
Charlie Flowers
Michele Wood
Victoria L Edge
James Ford
Carlee Wright
Sherilee L Harper
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East, Guelph, ON, N1G 2W1, Canada. sainim3@gmail.com.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2019 Apr 25; :
Date
Apr-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The Inuit community of Rigolet experiences greater rates of self-reported acute gastrointestinal illness (AGI) compared to southern Canada.
A whiteboard video tool was collaboratively developed by Rigolet youth, community members, the research team and key regional stakeholders to share public health recommendations for reducing the risk of AGI. The video debuted in Rigolet at a community event in August 2016 and was later provided online for community members and local and regional health departments. Interviews and focus group discussions were used to evaluate the ability of the video to communicate public health information to community members in Rigolet.
Community and government viewers reported that the whiteboard video was novel and engaging. Evaluation participants believed the video was suitable for promoting Inuit health because of the use of locally relevant visuals and narrative, which reflect Inuit art and storytelling traditions. Furthermore, participants indicated that the video co-development process was critical to ensuring community relevance of the video. Short-term outcome results suggest the video can reinforce health knowledge and potentially encourage behavioural change.
The results suggest this whiteboard video was an effective tool to share information and could increase intention to change behaviours to reduce the risk of AGI in Rigolet. While tools like the whiteboard video are gaining popularity, the participatory approach was used to develop the video, and its use in an Inuit context illustrates its innovation and novelty. This tool may be a useful health promotion tool among Indigenous communities in Canada.
PubMed ID
31025298 View in PubMed
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Protective factors for mental health and well-being in a changing climate: Perspectives from Inuit youth in Nunatsiavut, Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265532
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Jul 23;141:133-141
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-23-2015
Author
Joanna Petrasek MacDonald
Ashlee Cunsolo Willox
James D Ford
Inez Shiwak
Michele Wood
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Jul 23;141:133-141
Date
Jul-23-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The Canadian Arctic is experiencing rapid changes in climatic conditions, with implications for Inuit communities widely documented. Youth have been identified as an at-risk population, with likely impacts on mental health and well-being. This study identifies and characterizes youth-specific protective factors that enhance well-being in light of a rapidly changing climate, and examines how climatic and environmental change challenges these. In-depth conversational interviews were conducted with youth aged 15-25 from the five communities of the Nunatsiavut region of Labrador, Canada: Nain, Hopedale, Postville, Makkovik, and Rigolet. Five key protective factors were identified as enhancing their mental health and well-being: being on the land; connecting to Inuit culture; strong communities; relationships with family and friends; and staying busy. Changing sea ice and weather conditions were widely reported to be compromising these protective factors by reducing access to the land, and increasing the danger of land-based activities. This study contributes to existing work on Northern climate change adaptation by identifying factors that enhance youth resilience and, if incorporated into adaptation strategies, may contribute to creating successful and effective adaptation responses.
PubMed ID
26275362 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.