Skip header and navigation

Refine By

55 records – page 1 of 6.

Adverse Infant Outcomes Associated with Discordant Gestational Age Estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281353
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2016 11;30(6):541-549
Publication Type
Article
Date
11-2016
Author
Nils-Halvdan Morken
Rolv Skjaerven
Jennifer L Richards
Michael R Kramer
Sven Cnattingius
Stefan Johansson
Mika Gissler
Siobhan M Dolan
Jennifer Zeitlin
Michael S Kramer
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2016 11;30(6):541-549
Date
11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Birth Certificates
Data Accuracy
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Premature - physiology
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Male
Norway
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Sweden
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
United States
Abstract
Gestational age estimation by last menstrual period (LMP) vs. ultrasound (or best obstetric estimate in the US) may result in discrepant classification of preterm vs. term birth. We investigated whether such discrepancies are associated with adverse infant outcomes.
We studied singleton livebirths in the Medical Birth Registries of Norway, Sweden and Finland and US live birth certificates from 1999 to the most recent year available. Risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) by discordant and concordant gestational age estimation for infant, neonatal and post-neonatal mortality, Apgar score
PubMed ID
27555359 View in PubMed
Less detail

Amniotic-fluid embolism and medical induction of labour: a retrospective, population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166936
Source
Lancet. 2006 Oct 21;368(9545):1444-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2006
Author
Michael S Kramer
Jocelyn Rouleau
Thomas F Baskett
K S Joseph
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics and Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, QC, Canada. michael.kramer@mcgill.ca
Source
Lancet. 2006 Oct 21;368(9545):1444-8
Date
Oct-21-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Embolism, Amniotic Fluid - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Induced
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Amniotic-fluid embolism is a rare, but serious and often fatal maternal complication of delivery, of which the cause is unknown. We undertook an epidemiological study to investigate the association between amniotic-fluid embolism and medical induction of labour.
We used a population-based cohort of 3 million hospital deliveries in Canada between 1991 and 2002 to assess the associations between overall and fatal rates of amniotic-fluid embolism and medical and surgical induction, maternal age, fetal presentation, mode of delivery, and pregnancy and labour complications.
Total rate of amniotic-fluid embolism was 14.8 per 100,000 multiple-birth deliveries and 6.0 per 100,000 singleton deliveries (odds ratio 2.5 [95% CI 0.9-6.2]). Of the 180 cases of amniotic-fluid embolism in women with singleton deliveries during the study period, 24 (13%) were fatal. We saw no significant temporal increase in occurrence of amniotic-fluid embolism for total or fatal cases. Medical induction of labour nearly doubled the risk of overall cases of amniotic-fluid embolism (adjusted odds ratio 1.8 [1.3-2.7]), and the association was stronger for fatal cases (crude odds ratio 3.5 [1.5-8.4]). Maternal age of 35 years or older, caesarean or instrumental vaginal delivery, polyhydramnios, cervical laceration or uterine rupture, placenta previa or abruption, eclampsia, and fetal distress were also associated with an increased risk.
Medical induction of labour seems to increase the risk of amniotic-fluid embolism. Although the absolute excess risk is low, women and physicians should be aware of this risk when making decisions about elective labour induction.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2006 Oct 21;368(9545):1399-40117055926
PubMed ID
17055946 View in PubMed
Less detail

An International Comparison of Death Classification at 22 to 25 Weeks' Gestational Age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299751
Source
Pediatrics. 2018 07; 142(1):
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2018
Author
Lucy K Smith
Naho Morisaki
Nils-Halvdan Morken
Mika Gissler
Paromita Deb-Rinker
Jocelyn Rouleau
Stellan Hakansson
Michael R Kramer
Michael S Kramer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom.
Source
Pediatrics. 2018 07; 142(1):
Date
07-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Canada
Female
Fetal Death
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Japan
Norway
Pregnancy
Registries
Survival Rate
Sweden
United Kingdom
United States
Abstract
To explore international differences in the classification of births at extremely low gestation and the subsequent impact on the calculation of survival rates.
We used national data on births at 22 to 25 weeks' gestation from the United States (2014; n = 11?144), Canada (2009-2014; n = 5668), the United Kingdom (2014-2015; n = 2992), Norway (2010-2014; n = 409), Finland (2010-2015; n = 348), Sweden (2011-2014; n = 489), and Japan (2014-2015; n = 2288) to compare neonatal survival rates using different denominators: all births, births alive at the onset of labor, live births, live births surviving to 1 hour, and live births surviving to 24 hours.
For births at 22 weeks' gestation, neonatal survival rates for which we used live births as the denominator varied from 3.7% to 56.7% among the 7 countries. This variation decreased when the denominator was changed to include stillbirths (ie, all births [1.8%-22.3%] and fetuses alive at the onset of labor [3.7%-38.2%]) or exclude early deaths and limited to births surviving at least 12 hours (50.0%-77.8%). Similar trends were seen for infants born at 23 weeks' gestation. Variation diminished considerably at 24 and 25 weeks' gestation.
International variation in neonatal survival rates at 22 to 23 weeks' gestation diminished considerably when including stillbirths in the denominator, revealing the variation arises in part from differences in the proportion of births reported as live births, which itself is closely connected to the provision of active care.
PubMed ID
29899042 View in PubMed
Less detail

An inventory of Canadian pregnancy and birth cohort studies: research in progress.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119450
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2012;12:117
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Marie-Pier Joly
Michel Boivin
Anne Junker
Alan Bocking
Michael S Kramer
Stephanie A Atkinson
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2012;12:117
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Internet
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Pregnancy - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Research
Abstract
A web-based inventory was developed as a voluntary registry of Canadian pregnancy and birth cohort studies, with the objective to foster collaboration and sharing of research tools among cohort study groups as a means to enrich research in maternal and child health across Canada.
Information on existing birth cohort studies conducted in Canada exclusively or as part of broader international initiatives was accessed by searching the literature in PubMed and PsychInfo databases. Additional studies were identified by enquiring about the research activities of researchers at Canadian universities or working in affiliated hospitals or research centres or institutes. Of the fifty-eight birth cohort studies initially identified, forty-six were incorporated into the inventory if they were of a retrospective and/or prospective longitudinal design and with a minimum of two phases of data collection, with the first period having occurred before, during, or shortly after pregnancy and had an initial study sample size of a minimum of 200 participants.Information collected from each study was organized into four main categories: basic information, data source and period of collection, exposures, and outcome measures and was coded and entered into an Excel spreadsheet. The information incorporated into the Excel spreadsheet was double checked, completed when necessary, and verified for completeness and accuracy by contacting the principal investigator or research coordinator. All data collected were then uploaded onto the website of the Institute of Human Development Child and Youth Health of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Subsequently, the database was updated and developed as an online searchable inventory on the website of the Maternal, Infant, Child and Youth Research Network.
This inventory is unique, as it represents detailed information assembled for the first time on a large number of Canadian birth cohort studies. Such information provides a valuable resource for investigators in the planning stages of cohort studies and identifying current research gaps.
Notes
Cites: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 1987 Dec;8(6):318-263429670
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1987 Jun;150:782-63651732
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 1990 May;32(5):394-4022354753
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1993 Feb;34(2):189-2138444992
Cites: Stress. 2005 Mar;8(1):35-4516019596
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2008 Sep;47(9):1063-7218665002
Cites: BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2009;9:1619397827
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2009 Jul;23(4):301-919523077
Cites: Allergy. 2009 Aug;64(8):1185-9319416140
Cites: Am Heart J. 2009 Oct;158(4):533-919781411
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2010 Mar;51(3):295-30319804381
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2001 Jul;15 Suppl 2:104-2311520404
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Apr 10;287(14):1822-3111939868
Cites: J Clin Child Adolesc Psychol. 2003 Jun;32(2):215-2712679279
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 2003 Sep;103(9):1178-8412963948
Cites: Dev Med Child Neurol. 2004 Aug;46(8):508-1315287240
Cites: Pediatr Res. 2004 Sep;56(3):400-1015240860
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2004 Sep;191(3):864-7115467555
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 1980 Dec;6(6):415-247472153
Cites: Neurotoxicol Teratol. 1988 Jul-Aug;10(4):305-133226373
PubMed ID
23101595 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antioxidant vitamins, long-chain fatty acids, and spontaneous preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149956
Source
Epidemiology. 2009 Sep;20(5):707-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Michael S Kramer
Susan R Kahn
Robert W Platt
Jacques Genest
Rima Rozen
Moy Fong Chen
Lise Goulet
Louise Séguin
Clément Dassa
John Lydon
Helen McNamara
Mourad Dahhou
Julie Lamoureux
Rhobert W Evans
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. michael.kramer@mcgill.ca
Source
Epidemiology. 2009 Sep;20(5):707-13
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - analysis
Case-Control Studies
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Humans
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Quebec - epidemiology
Vitamins - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Neither macro- nor micronutrient supplements have been clearly demonstrated to reduce the risk of preterm birth. However, there has been little attention to carotenoids, tocopherols, and long-chain fatty acids other than n-3 polyunsaturates.
We conducted a case-control study nested in a large (n = 5337) prospective, multicenter cohort. All cohort women had an interview, examination, and venipuncture at 24-26 weeks' gestation. Frozen plasma samples in spontaneous preterm births (n = 207) and approximately 2-term controls per case (n = 443) were analyzed for carotenoids, retinol, tocopherols, and long-chain fatty acids. Fresh placentas were fixed, stained, and assessed (without knowledge of pregnancy outcome) for histologic evidence of infection or inflammation, decidual vasculopathy, and infarction.
High (above the median) plasma concentrations of alpha- and beta-carotene, alpha- and beta-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene were all associated with reductions in risk of spontaneous preterm birth, with evidence of dose-response effects across quartiles. Modest increases in risk were observed with elevated total monounsaturated, total polyunsaturated, and total n-6 polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids concentrations. Paradoxically, a high gamma-tocopherol concentration was associated with increased preterm birth risk (adjusted odds ratio = 1.8 [95% confidence interval = 1.2-2.6]). Only one of the studied micronutrients (lutein) was independently associated with a reduced risk of decidual vasculopathy (0.5 [0.3-0.9]).
Carotenoids and long-chain fatty acids warrant further investigation in in vitro, animal, and human studies of preterm birth.
PubMed ID
19568173 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between maternal chronic conditions and congenital heart defects: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112613
Source
Circulation. 2013 Aug 6;128(6):583-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-6-2013
Author
Shiliang Liu
K S Joseph
Sarka Lisonkova
Jocelyn Rouleau
Michiel Van den Hof
Reg Sauve
Michael S Kramer
Author Affiliation
Centre for Chronic Disease Prevention, Public Health Agency of Canada, Room 405A2, AL 8604A, 785 Carling Ave, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0K9. sliu@uottawa.ca
Source
Circulation. 2013 Aug 6;128(6):583-9
Date
Aug-6-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Connective Tissue Diseases - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Down Syndrome - epidemiology
Epilepsy - epidemiology
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mood Disorders - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy, Multiple - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Thyroid Diseases - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
This study quantifies the association between maternal medical conditions/illnesses and congenital heart defects (CHDs) among infants.
We carried out a population-based study of all mother-infant pairs (n=2,278,838) in Canada (excluding Quebec) from 2002 to 2010 using data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information. CHDs among infants were classified phenotypically through a hierarchical grouping of International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision, Canada codes. Maternal conditions such as multifetal pregnancy, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and congenital heart disease were defined by use of diagnosis codes. The association between maternal conditions and CHDs and its subtypes was modeled using logistic regression with adjustment for maternal age, parity, residence, and other factors. There were 26 488 infants diagnosed with CHDs at birth or at rehospitalization in infancy; the overall CHD prevalence was 116.2 per 10,000 live births, of which the severe CHD rate was 22.3 per 10,000. Risk factors for CHD included maternal age =40 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39-1.58), multifetal pregnancy (aOR, 4.53; 95% CI, 4.28-4.80), diabetes mellitus (type 1: aOR, 4.65; 95% CI, 4.13-5.24; type 2: aOR, 4.12; 95% CI, 3.69-4.60), hypertension (aOR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.61-2.03), thyroid disorders (aOR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.26-1.67), congenital heart disease (aOR, 9.92; 95% CI, 8.36-11.8), systemic connective tissue disorders (aOR, 3.01; 95% CI, 2.23-4.06), and epilepsy and mood disorders (aOR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.16-1.72). Specific CHD subtypes were associated with different maternal risk factors.
Several chronic maternal medical conditions, including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, connective tissue disorders, and congenital heart disease, confer an increased risk of CHD in the offspring.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Med. 2014 Apr;19(2):e824282172
PubMed ID
23812182 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birth outcomes among First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287099
Source
Health Rep. 2017 Nov 15;28(11):11-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2017
Author
Amanda J Sheppard
Gabriel D Shapiro
Tracey Bushnik
Russell Wilkins
Serenity Perry
Jay S Kaufman
Michael S Kramer
Seungmi Yang
Source
Health Rep. 2017 Nov 15;28(11):11-16
Date
Nov-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
First Nations, Inuit, and Métis are at higher risk of adverse birth outcomes than are non-Indigenous people. However, relatively little perinatal information is available at the national level for Indigenous people overall or for specific identity groups.
This analysis describes and compares rates of preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age birth, large-for-gestational-age birth, stillbirth, and infant mortality (neonatal, postneonatal, and cause-specific) in a nationally representative sample of First Nations, Inuit, Métis, and non-Indigenous births. The study cohort consisted of 17,547 births to Indigenous mothers and 112,112 births to non-Indigenous mothers from 2004 through 2006. The cohort was created by linking the Canadian Live Birth, Infant Death and Stillbirth Database to the long form of the 2006 Census, which contains a self-reported Indigenous identifier.
With the exception of small-for-gestational-age birth, adverse birth outcomes occurred more frequently among First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women than among non-Indigenous women. Inuit had the highest preterm birth rate (11.4 per 100 births; 95% CI: 9.7 to 13.1) among the three Indigenous groups. The large-for-gestational-age rate was highest for First Nations births (20.9 per 100 births; 95% CI: 19.9 to 21.8). Infant mortality rates were more than twice as high for each Indigenous group compared with the non-Indigenous population, and rates of sudden infant death syndrome were more than seven times higher among First Nations and Inuit.
The results confirm disparities in birth outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations, and demonstrate differences among First Nations, Métis and Inuit.
PubMed ID
29140536 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birth outcomes among First Nations, Inuit and Métis populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295190
Source
Health Rep. 2017 Nov 15; 28(11):11-16
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-15-2017
Author
Amanda J Sheppard
Gabriel D Shapiro
Tracey Bushnik
Russell Wilkins
Serenity Perry
Jay S Kaufman
Michael S Kramer
Seungmi Yang
Author Affiliation
Cancer Care Ontario, and University of Toronto.
Source
Health Rep. 2017 Nov 15; 28(11):11-16
Date
Nov-15-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Censuses
Cohort Studies
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Infant Mortality - ethnology
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - ethnology
Premature Birth
Stillbirth
Young Adult
Abstract
First Nations, Inuit, and Métis are at higher risk of adverse birth outcomes than are non-Indigenous people. However, relatively little perinatal information is available at the national level for Indigenous people overall or for specific identity groups.
This analysis describes and compares rates of preterm birth, small-for-gestational-age birth, large-for-gestational-age birth, stillbirth, and infant mortality (neonatal, postneonatal, and cause-specific) in a nationally representative sample of First Nations, Inuit, Métis, and non-Indigenous births. The study cohort consisted of 17,547 births to Indigenous mothers and 112,112 births to non-Indigenous mothers from 2004 through 2006. The cohort was created by linking the Canadian Live Birth, Infant Death and Stillbirth Database to the long form of the 2006 Census, which contains a self-reported Indigenous identifier.
With the exception of small-for-gestational-age birth, adverse birth outcomes occurred more frequently among First Nations, Inuit, and Métis women than among non-Indigenous women. Inuit had the highest preterm birth rate (11.4 per 100 births; 95% CI: 9.7 to 13.1) among the three Indigenous groups. The large-for-gestational-age rate was highest for First Nations births (20.9 per 100 births; 95% CI: 19.9 to 21.8). Infant mortality rates were more than twice as high for each Indigenous group compared with the non-Indigenous population, and rates of sudden infant death syndrome were more than seven times higher among First Nations and Inuit.
The results confirm disparities in birth outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations, and demonstrate differences among First Nations, Métis and Inuit.
PubMed ID
29140536 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birth weight differences between preterm stillbirths and live births: analysis of population-based studies from the U.S. and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119355
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2012;12:119
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Xun Zhang
K S Joseph
Sven Cnattingius
Michael S Kramer
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Canada.
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2012;12:119
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Live Birth
Pregnancy
Premature Birth
Stillbirth
Sweden
United States
Abstract
Many stillbirths show evidence of fetal growth restriction, and most occur at preterm gestational age. The objective of this study is to compare birth weights at preterm gestational ages between live births and stillbirths, and between those occurring before or during labour.
Based on singleton births from the United States (U.S.) 2003-2005 (n=902,491) and Sweden 1992-2001 (n=946,343), we compared birth weights between singleton live births and stillbirths at 24-36 completed weeks of gestation from the U.S. and at 28-42 completed weeks from Sweden.
In both the U.S. and Sweden, stillbirth weight-for-gestational-age z-scores were at least one standard deviation lower than live birth z-scores at all preterm gestational ages (GA). In Sweden, no birth weight difference was observed between antepartum and intrapartum stillbirths at preterm GAs, whereas birth weights among intrapartum stillbirths were similar to those among live births at 37-42 weeks.
Birth weights observed at preterm gestation are abnormal, but preterm stillbirths appear to be more growth-restricted than preterm live birth. Similar birth weights among ante- and intrapartum preterm stillbirths suggest serious fetal compromise before the onset of labor.
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 2007 Jun;150(6):603-7, 607.e1-317517243
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Sep;104(9):1043-99307532
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;21 Suppl 2:22-3017803615
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Nov;110(5):1151-6417978132
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Nov 17;370(9600):1715-2518022035
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Apr 1;167(7):786-9218343882
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Sep;199(3):319.e1-418771999
Cites: BJOG. 2008 Oct;115(11):1397-40418823489
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Oct;114(4):901-1419888051
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2010 Aug;203(2):124.e1-720478548
Cites: BJOG. 2001 Aug;108(8):830-411510708
Cites: BJOG. 2001 Nov;108(11):1113-511762647
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 2001 Nov 15;104(1):7-1311746021
Cites: Semin Perinatol. 2002 Feb;26(1):79-8211876571
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2004 Sep;83(9):801-715315590
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1984 Jun;63(6):809-146728362
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1987 Feb;94(2):115-203548805
Cites: Scand J Soc Med. 1990 Jun;18(2):143-82367825
Cites: Radiology. 1991 Oct;181(1):129-331887021
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1992 Oct;80(4):575-841383898
Cites: Lancet. 1995 Aug 19;346(8973):486-87637485
Cites: BMJ. 1998 May 16;316(7143):1483-79582131
Cites: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1998 May;105(5):524-309637122
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1998 Jun;178(6):1121-59662289
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1998 Dec 17;339(25):1817-229854117
Cites: Pediatr Res. 2005 Feb;57(2):205-1015611356
Cites: BMJ. 2005 Nov 12;331(7525):1113-716236774
Cites: J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2006 Jan-Feb;35(1):3-1216466348
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Apr;194(4):911-516580275
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Jan;109(1):153-6717197601
Cites: BJOG. 2007 Apr;114(4):474-717378820
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Apr;109(4):798-917400838
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2007 Apr;109(4):813-2217400841
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 1995;73(4):449-607554016
Cites: Ultrasound Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Sep;6(3):168-748521065
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1996 Feb;87(2):163-88559516
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Jun 15;312(7045):1505-88646141
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;21 Suppl 2:13-2117803614
PubMed ID
23110432 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cause-specific mortality during and after pregnancy and the definition of maternal death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191183
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2002;23(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Linda A Turner
Michael S Kramer
Shiliang Liu
Author Affiliation
Bureau of Reproductive and Child Health, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 2002;23(1):31-6
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Maternal mortality
Pregnancy
Abstract
As part of a study to determine whether maternal mortality in Canada is under- reported, we explored the validity of including deaths not directly related to pregnancy. We linked live birth and stillbirth registrations to death registrations of women of reproductive age from 1988 through 1992. We calculated standardized mortality ratios, by cause, from deaths in women known to have been pregnant and deaths in same-aged women not known to have been pregnant within the same time period. Women known to have been pregnant were approximately half as likely to die as would be expected in each of two six-month time periods: from 20 weeks gestation to 42 days postpartum (SMR 0.4, 95% CI 0.3-0.5), and from 42 days to 225 days postpartum (SMR 0.5, 95% CI 0.5-0.6). Furthermore, pregnant and recently pregnant women were not more likely to die from specific causes, with the exception of diseases of the arteries, arterioles, and capillaries (SMR 3.5, 95% CI 1.3-7.7) during pregnancy or within 42 days of pregnancy termination. The only other SMR that was > 1 was for death from cerebrovascular disorders during pregnancy and up to 42 days postpartum, although not significantly so (SMR 1.4, 95% CI 0.8-2.2). No other cause-specific SMRs were > 1. Moreover, recently pregnant women were found to be much less likely to commit suicide or to be the victims of homicide. We found no empirical justification for including deaths not directly related to pregnancy in reported counts of maternal deaths for most of the causal categories we considered.
PubMed ID
11876834 View in PubMed
Less detail

55 records – page 1 of 6.