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The association of dietary alpha-linolenic acid with blood pressure and subclinical atherosclerosis in people born small for gestational age: the Special Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264230
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 May;166(5):1252-1257.e2
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Michael R Skilton
Katja Pahkala
Jorma S A Viikari
Tapani Rönnemaa
Olli Simell
Antti Jula
Harri Niinikoski
David S Celermajer
Olli T Raitakari
Source
J Pediatr. 2015 May;166(5):1252-1257.e2
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aorta - pathology
Atherosclerosis - blood
Birth weight
Blood pressure
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intervention Studies
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Risk factors
alpha-Linolenic Acid - administration & dosage
Abstract
To determine whether dietary alpha-linolenic (omega-3) fatty acid intake is associated with lower blood pressure and aortic intima-media thickness (IMT) in people born small for gestational age (SGA).
Participants were recruited at age 6 months and followed up every 6-12 months until age 19 years. Blood pressure and food records were assessed at each visit. A total of 1009 participants had at least one blood pressure measure and complete birth weight and gestational age data, including 115 (11%) born SGA (birth weight=10th percentile). Aortic IMT was assessed by ultrasound at 19 years (n=413). Analysis was by linear mixed models and multivariable linear regression.
Children born SGA had greater systolic and pulse pressure from age 14 years onwards. In those born SGA, systolic blood pressure was 2.1 mm Hg lower ([95% CI 0.8-3.3]; P=.001) and pulse pressure 1.4 mm Hg lower ([95% CI 0.3-2.4]; P=.01), per exponential increase in alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) intake; weakened by adjustment for anthropometric measures. Long-term ALA intake was inversely associated with aortic IMT at 19 years in those born SGA (-0.30 mm [95% CI -0.52, -0.08] per exponential greater ALA intake; P=.008), independent of other dietary and anthropometric factors.
Long-term dietary ALA intake during childhood is associated with improved vascular health in people born SGA.
PubMed ID
25702059 View in PubMed
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Childbearing, child-rearing, cardiovascular risk factors, and progression of carotid intima-media thickness: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142949
Source
Stroke. 2010 Jul;41(7):1332-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Michael R Skilton
Fabrice Bonnet
Lisa M Begg
Markus Juonala
Mika Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Baker IDI Heart & Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia. michael.skilton@bakeridi.edu.au
Source
Stroke. 2010 Jul;41(7):1332-7
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - pathology
Carotid Arteries - pathology
Carotid Artery Diseases - etiology - pathology
Child
Child Rearing - trends
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disease Progression
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Parturition
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - pathology
Risk factors
Tunica Intima - pathology
Tunica Media - pathology
Abstract
Parity is associated with the risk of clinical cardiovascular events and the severity of preclinical atherosclerosis in older subjects. We sought to determine whether childbearing is associated with concurrent changes in cardiovascular risk factors and the progression of carotid intima-media thickness.
We examined the association between the number of children born during a 6-year period and concurrent changes in cardiovascular risk factors and progression of carotid intima-media thickness in men and women of reproductive age from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study. Complete data for parity and carotid intima-media thickness were available for 1786 subjects (1005 females, 781 males).
For females, childbirth during the 6-year follow-up was associated with concurrent reductions in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P(trend)
PubMed ID
20538698 View in PubMed
Less detail

Continuous and Dichotomous Metabolic Syndrome Definitions in Youth Predict Adult Type 2 Diabetes and Carotid Artery Intima Media Thickness: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275393
Source
J Pediatr. 2016 Apr;171:97-103.e1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Costan G Magnussen
Sanith Cheriyan
Matthew A Sabin
Markus Juonala
Juha Koskinen
Russell Thomson
Michael R Skilton
Mika Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Leena Taittonen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Source
J Pediatr. 2016 Apr;171:97-103.e1-3
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood
Carotid Arteries - pathology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the utility of continuous metabolic syndrome (cMetS) scores vs a dichotomous metabolic syndrome (MetS) definition in youth to predict adult type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT).
Participants (n = 1453) from the population-based, prospective, observational Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study who were examined in youth (when aged 9-18 years) and re-examined 15-25 years later. Four cMetS scores were constructed according to procedures most often used in the literature that comprised the youth risk factor inputs of body mass index, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and triglycerides. Adult outcomes included T2DM and high carotid IMT (= 90 th percentile).
For a 1 SD increase in cMetS scores in youth, participants had a 30%-78% increased risk of T2DM and 12%-61% increased risk of high carotid IMT. Prediction of adult T2DM and high carotid IMT using cMetS scores in youth was essentially no different to a dichotomous MetS definition with area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve ranging from 0.54-0.60 (continuous definitions) and 0.55-0.59 (dichotomous) with 95% CIs often including 0.5, and integrated discrimination improvement from -0.2% to -0.6%.
cMetS scores in youth are predictive of cardiometabolic outcomes in adulthood. However, they do not have increased predictive utility over a dichotomous definition of MetS.
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2016 Apr;171:14-526795681
PubMed ID
26681473 View in PubMed
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A diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome in youth that resolves by adult life is associated with a normalization of high carotid intima-media thickness and type 2 diabetes mellitus risk: the Bogalusa heart and cardiovascular risk in young Finns studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120285
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 23;60(17):1631-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-23-2012
Author
Costan G Magnussen
Juha Koskinen
Markus Juonala
Wei Chen
Sathanur R Srinivasan
Matthew A Sabin
Russell Thomson
Michael D Schmidt
Quoc Manh Nguyen
Ji-Hua Xu
Michael R Skilton
Mika Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Leena Taittonen
Terho Lehtimäki
Tapani Rönnemaa
Jorma S A Viikari
Gerald S Berenson
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. cmagnuss@utas.edu.au
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 23;60(17):1631-9
Date
Oct-23-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aging
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Remission, Spontaneous
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the effect of resolution from metabolic syndrome (MetS) between youth and adulthood on carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).
Published findings demonstrate that youth with MetS are at increased risk of cardio-metabolic outcomes in adulthood. It is not known whether this risk is attenuated in those who resolve their MetS status.
Participants (n = 1,757) from 2 prospective cohort studies were examined as youth (when 9 to 18 years of age) and re-examined 14 to 27 years later. The presence of any 3 components (low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high triglycerides, high glucose, high blood pressure, or high body mass index) previously shown to predict adult outcomes defined youth MetS; the harmonized MetS criteria defined adulthood MetS. Participants were classified according to their MetS status at baseline and follow-up and examined for risk of high IMT and T2DM.
Those with MetS in youth and adulthood were at 3.4 times the risk (95% confidence interval: 2.4 to 4.9) of high IMT and 12.2 times the risk (95% confidence interval: 6.3 to 23.9) of T2DM in adulthood compared with those that did not have MetS at either time-point, whereas those that had resolved their youth MetS status by adulthood showed similar risk to those that did not have MetS at either time-point (p > 0.20 for all comparisons).
Although youth with MetS are at increased risk of adult high IMT and T2DM, these data indicate that the resolution of youth MetS by adulthood can go some way to normalize this risk to levels seen in those who have never had MetS.
PubMed ID
23021330 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of birth weight on life-course blood pressure levels among children born premature: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271752
Source
J Hypertens. 2015 Aug;33(8):1542-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Markus Juonala
Michael M H Cheung
Matthew A Sabin
David Burgner
Michael R Skilton
Mika Kähönen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Antti Jula
Tomi Laitinen
Eero Jokinen
Leena Taittonen
Päivi Tossavainen
Jorma S A Viikari
Costan G Magnussen
Olli T Raitakari
Source
J Hypertens. 2015 Aug;33(8):1542-8
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Weight - physiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - physiopathology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology
Infant, Low Birth Weight - physiology
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - physiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - physiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Premature Birth - physiopathology
Risk factors
Term Birth - physiology
Abstract
Both fetal growth restriction and prematurity have been associated with elevated blood pressure (BP). However, their combined effects on adult BP are unclear.
Our analyses were based on 1756 participants in the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study who had information on birth weight and gestational age, together with longitudinal data on cardiovascular risk markers from age 3-18 years in 1980 to age 34-49 years in 2011. Three groups were defined by birth data: those born at term (term); those born preterm (-1 SD z score according to national sex and gestational week-stratified data) for gestational age (preterm appropriate birth weight for gestational age); and those born preterm with low birth weight (=-1 SD z score) for gestational age [preterm small birth weight for gestational age (SGA)].
There were no differences between the three groups in BP at baseline, but at the 31-year follow-up (mean age 41 years), mean SBP in the preterm SGA group was 7.2 mmHg (95% confidence interval?=?2.3-12.1 mmHg, P?=?0.004) higher than the preterm appropriate birth weight for gestational age group and 7.3 mmHg (95% confidence interval?=?5.2-9.4 mmHg, P?
PubMed ID
26136063 View in PubMed
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Fenofibrate effects on arterial endothelial function in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A FIELD substudy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273211
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Sep;242(1):295-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Jason A Harmer
Anthony C Keech
Anne-Sophie Veillard
Michael R Skilton
Thomas H Marwick
Gerald F Watts
Ian T Meredith
David S Celermajer
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Sep;242(1):295-302
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Australia
Brachial Artery - drug effects - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Double-Blind Method
Dyslipidemias - blood - diagnosis - drug therapy
Endothelium, Vascular - drug effects - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Female
Fenofibrate - therapeutic use
Finland
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
New Zealand
Nitroglycerin - pharmacology
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vasodilation - drug effects
Vasodilator Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
Dislipidaemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus contributes to arterial endothelial dysfunction and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Fenofibrate, a lipid-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-a (PPARa) agonist, has been shown to reduce vascular complications in adults with type 2 diabetes. However, the mechanisms for such benefit are not well understood. We examined the effects of fenofibrate on brachial artery endothelial function in adults with type 2 diabetes.
In a prospectively designed substudy of the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study, we assessed arterial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD; endothelium-dependent dilatation) and dilator responses to glyceryl trinitrate (GTN, an endothelium-independent dilator) in a subset of 193 representative adults. Traditional risk factors were assessed at baseline, 4 months and 2 years after randomised treatment allocation to fenofibrate (200 mg daily) or placebo. The prespecified primary study endpoint was the difference in FMD between treatment groups at 4 months.
Fenofibrate was associated with a significant improvement at 4 months compared with placebo (+1.05% (absolute); P=0.03); GTN-dilator responses were unchanged (P=0.77). After 2 years, FMD was similar in both groups (P=0.46). In multivariable models, none of the fenofibrate-related changes in lipoproteins and lipids were significantly associated with improved FMD on fenofibrate at 4 months.
Treatment with fenofibrate significantly improved arterial endothelial function after 4 months. However, the effect was no longer apparent after 2 years. The long-term beneficial vascular effects of fenofibrate in type 2 diabetes are likely to be mediated via mechanisms other than improvement in endothelium-dependent dilatation of conduit arteries, and may differ for the microcirculation.
PubMed ID
26233916 View in PubMed
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Fetal growth and preterm birth influence cardiovascular risk factors and arterial health in young adults: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131064
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2011 Dec;31(12):2975-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Michael R Skilton
Jorma S A Viikari
Markus Juonala
Tomi Laitinen
Terho Lehtimäki
Leena Taittonen
Mika Kähönen
David S Celermajer
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise and Eating Disorders, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. michael.skilton@sydney.edu.au
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2011 Dec;31(12):2975-81
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Brachial Artery - physiology
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology - physiopathology
Carotid Arteries - physiology - ultrasonography
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Development - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Premature Birth - physiopathology
Regional Blood Flow - physiology
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology - physiopathology
Abstract
Impaired fetal growth is associated with cardiovascular disease in adulthood. The mechanisms of this association remain poorly described. We aimed to determine the associations of impaired fetal growth and preterm birth with cardiovascular risk factors and arterial health in a large cohort of young adults.
Carotid intima-media thickness, brachial flow-mediated dilatation and cardiovascular risk factors were compared between young adults (24-45 years) born at term with impaired fetal growth (birth weight
PubMed ID
21940950 View in PubMed
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Fetal growth, omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids, and progression of subclinical atherosclerosis: preventing fetal origins of disease? The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118984
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Michael R Skilton
Vera Mikkilä
Peter Würtz
Mika Ala-Korpela
Kyra A Sim
Pasi Soininen
Antti J Kangas
Jorma S A Viikari
Markus Juonala
Tomi Laitinen
Terho Lehtimäki
Leena Taittonen
Mika Kähönen
David S Celermajer
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise and Eating Disorders, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. michael.skilton@sydney.edu.au
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2013 Jan;97(1):58-65
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Disease Progression
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage - blood
Female
Fetal Development
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Life Style
Linear Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Impaired fetal growth is independently associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events in adulthood. Prevention strategies that can be implemented during adulthood have not been identified.
The objective was to determine whether habitual omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid intake is associated with the rate of increase of carotid intima-media thickness during adulthood in individuals with impaired fetal growth.
This was a population-based, prospective cohort study of 1573 adults in Finland. Carotid intima-media thickness was assessed in 2001 (at ages 24-39 y) and in 2007. Participants were categorized as having had impaired fetal growth (term birth with birth weight
PubMed ID
23151534 View in PubMed
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High birth weight is associated with obesity and increased carotid wall thickness in young adults: the cardiovascular risk in young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104731
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 May;34(5):1064-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Michael R Skilton
Niina Siitonen
Peter Würtz
Jorma S A Viikari
Markus Juonala
Ilkka Seppälä
Tomi Laitinen
Terho Lehtimäki
Leena Taittonen
Mika Kähönen
David S Celermajer
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
From the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise, and Eating Disorders (M.R.S), and Sydney Medical School (D.S.C.), University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine (N.S., M.J., O.T.R.), Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine (O.T.R.), and Department of Medicine (J.S.A.V., M.J.), University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland (T. Laitinen); Department of Clinical Chemistry, Fimlab Laboratories (I.S., T. Lehtimäki), and Department of Clinical Physiology (M.K.), University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland (P.W.); and Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, and Department of Pediatrics, Vaasa Central Hospital, Vaasa, Finland (L.T.).
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2014 May;34(5):1064-8
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Age Factors
Asymptomatic Diseases
Birth weight
Body mass index
Brachial Artery - physiopathology
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Case-Control Studies
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Obesity, Abdominal - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Prognosis
Regional Blood Flow
Risk factors
Vasodilation
Waist Circumference
Young Adult
Abstract
There is some evidence that people born with high birth weight may be at increased risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Details of the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We sought to determine whether people born large for gestational age have poor arterial health, increased adiposity, and a poor cardiovascular risk factor profile.
Carotid intima-media thickness, brachial flow-mediated dilatation, and cardiovascular risk factors were compared between young adults (24-45 years) born at term who were large for gestational age (birth weight >90th percentile; n=171), and a control group with normal birth weight (50-75th percentile; n=525), in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Those born large for gestational age had higher body mass index throughout childhood, adolescence, and as young adults (26.4 kg/m(2) [SD 4.9], versus normal birth weight 25.1 kg/m(2) [SD 4.6]; P=0.002), and 2-fold greater risk of obesity. Other cardiovascular risk factors and arterial function did not differ; however, carotid intima-media thickness was increased in people born large for gestational age (0.60 mm [SD 0.09], versus normal birth weight 0.57 mm [SD 0.09]; P=0.003), independent of cardiovascular risk factors (P=0.001 after adjustment). Both obesity and high birth weight were independently associated with carotid intima-media thickness in a graded and additive fashion.
Young adults born large for gestational age are more likely to be obese, yet have an otherwise healthy cardiovascular risk profile. Nonetheless, they have increased carotid intima-media thickness, a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, consistent with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.
PubMed ID
24626439 View in PubMed
Less detail

Metabolic signatures of birthweight in 18 288 adolescents and adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289513
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 10; 45(5):1539-1550
Publication Type
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
10-2016
Author
Peter Würtz
Qin Wang
Marjo Niironen
Tuulia Tynkkynen
Mika Tiainen
Fotios Drenos
Antti J Kangas
Pasi Soininen
Michael R Skilton
Kauko Heikkilä
Anneli Pouta
Mika Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Richard J Rose
Eero Kajantie
Markus Perola
Jaakko Kaprio
Johan G Eriksson
Olli T Raitakari
Debbie A Lawlor
George Davey Smith
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Mika Ala-Korpela
Kirsi Auro
Author Affiliation
Computational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu and Biocenter Oulu, Oulu, Finland peter.wurtz@computationalmedicine.fi.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2016 10; 45(5):1539-1550
Date
10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adiposity
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Amino Acids - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
Disease Susceptibility - blood - metabolism
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
High-Throughput Screening Assays
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight - blood - metabolism
Infant, Newborn
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Metabolomics
Middle Aged
Risk factors
United Kingdom
Young Adult
Abstract
Lower birthweight is associated with increased susceptibility to cardiometabolic diseases in adulthood, but the underlying molecular pathways are incompletely understood. We examined associations of birthweight with a comprehensive metabolic profile measured in adolescents and adults.
High-throughput nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics and biochemical assays were used to quantify 87 circulating metabolic measures in seven cohorts from Finland and the UK, comprising altogether 18 288 individuals (mean age 26 years, range 15-75). Metabolic associations with birthweight were assessed by linear regression models adjusted for sex, gestational age and age at blood sampling. The metabolic associations with birthweight were compared with the corresponding associations with adult body mass index (BMI).
Lower birthweight adjusted for gestational age was adversely associated with cardiometabolic biomarkers, including lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acids, amino acids and markers of inflammation and impaired liver function (P
Notes
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