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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of pneumonia severity and acute physiology scores to predict ICU admission and mortality in patients hospitalized for influenza.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144929
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(3):e9563
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Matthew P Muller
Allison J McGeer
Kazi Hassan
John Marshall
Michael Christian
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, St Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. mullerm@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(3):e9563
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Area Under Curve
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission
Pneumonia - diagnosis
Prognosis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The demand for inpatient medical services increases during influenza season. A scoring system capable of identifying influenza patients at low risk death or ICU admission could help clinicians make hospital admission decisions.
Hospitalized patients with laboratory confirmed influenza were identified over 3 influenza seasons at 25 Ontario hospitals. Each patient was assigned a score for 6 pneumonia severity and 2 sepsis scores using the first data available following their registration in the emergency room. In-hospital mortality and ICU admission were the outcomes. Score performance was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and the sensitivity and specificity for identifying low risk patients (risk of outcome or=0.80). The Pneumonia Severity Index (AUC 0.78, 95% CI 0.72-0.83) and the Mortality in Emergency Department Sepsis score (AUC 0.77, 95% 0.71-0.83) demonstrated fair predictive ability (AUC>or=0.70) for in-hospital mortality. The best predictor of ICU admission was SMART-COP (AUC 0.73, 95% CI 0.67-0.79). All other scores were poor predictors (AUC
Notes
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PubMed ID
20221431 View in PubMed
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Late recognition of SARS in nosocomial outbreak, Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175853
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Feb;11(2):322-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Thomas Wong
Tamara Wallington
L Clifford McDonald
Zahid Abbas
Michael Christian
Donald E Low
Denise Gravel
Marianna Ofner
Barbara Mederski
Lisa Berger
Lisa Hansen
Cheryl Harrison
Arlene King
Barbara Yaffe
Theresa Tam
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Room 3444, Building # 6. AL: 0603B, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario K1A OL2, Canada. tom_wong@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2005 Feb;11(2):322-5
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Cross Infection - epidemiology - virology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
RNA, Viral - chemistry - genetics
Retrospective Studies
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
SARS Virus - growth & development
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Abstract
Late recognition of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was associated with no known SARS contact, hospitalization before the nosocomial outbreak was recognized, symptom onset while hospitalized, wards with SARS clusters, and postoperative status. SARS is difficult to recognize in hospitalized patients with a variety of underlying conditions in the absence of epidemiologic links.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15752456 View in PubMed
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