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Centrality of positive and negative deployment memories predicts posttraumatic growth in danish veterans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269325
Source
J Clin Psychol. 2015 Apr;71(4):362-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Søren Risløv Staugaard
Kim Berg Johannessen
Yvonne Duval Thomsen
Mette Bertelsen
Dorthe Berntsen
Source
J Clin Psychol. 2015 Apr;71(4):362-77
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Afghan Campaign 2001-
Combat Disorders - psychology
Denmark
Extraversion (Psychology)
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Memory
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Social Support
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Veterans - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to examine theoretically motivated predictors for the development of positive changes following potentially traumatic experiences (i.e., posttraumatic growth). Specifically, we wanted to examine the prediction that memories of highly negative and positive deployment events predict subsequent posttraumatic growth.
A total of 251 Danish soldiers (7% female, mean age 26.4) deployed to forward operating bases in Afghanistan filled out questionnaires before, during, and after deployment. This allowed us to perform prospective as well as cross-sectional analyses of the data.
The main findings were that the centrality of highly emotional memories from deployment predicted growth alongside openness to experience, combat exposure, and social support. Importantly, the centrality of both positive and negative memories predicted growth equally well.
The perceived importance of both negative and positive events may play an important part in the development of posttraumatic growth.
PubMed ID
25522344 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community integration after deployment to Afghanistan: a longitudinal investigation of Danish soldiers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267596
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;50(4):653-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Karen-Inge Karstoft
Cherie Armour
Søren B Andersen
Mette Bertelsen
Trine Madsen
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2015 Apr;50(4):653-60
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Afghan Campaign 2001-
Community Integration
Denmark
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Military Personnel - psychology
Self Care
Social Adjustment
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
In the years following military deployment, soldiers may experience problems integrating into the community. However, little is known about the nature and prevalence of these problems and if they relate to posttraumatic symptomatology.
In a prospective, longitudinal study of Danish soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 (N = 743), we assessed community reintegration difficulties 2.5 years after home coming (study sample: N = 454). Furthermore, symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were assessed before, during, and after deployment. Trajectories of PTSD symptoms from a previously published latent growth mixture modeling analysis were used to address whether community reintegration difficulties differ as a result of course and level of PTSD symptoms.
Between 3.6 and 18.0% reported to have some, a lot, or extreme difficulties in reintegration domains such as interpersonal functioning, productivity, community involvement, and self-care. Mean level of reintegration difficulties differed significantly across six PTSD symptom trajectories (range 6.35-36.00); with more symptomatic trajectories experiencing greater community reintegration difficulties.
Reintegration difficulties after deployment are present in less than 20% of Danish soldiers who return from Afghanistan. Difficulties are greater in individuals who follow symptomatic PTSD trajectories in the first years following deployment than in those who follow a low-stable trajectory with no or few symptoms.
PubMed ID
25308059 View in PubMed
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Comorbidity in patients with branch retinal vein occlusion: case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118480
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e7885
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mette Bertelsen
Allan Linneberg
Thomas Rosenberg
Nynne Christoffersen
Henrik Vorum
Else Gade
Michael Larsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup Hospital, Nordre Ringvej 57, 2600 Glostrup, Denmark.
Source
BMJ. 2012;345:e7885
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Peripheral Arterial Disease - epidemiology
Retinal Vein Occlusion - epidemiology
Abstract
To evaluate comorbidity before and after the diagnosis of branch retinal vein occlusion to determine whether it is a consequence of arterial thickening and therefore could serve as a diagnostic marker for other comorbidities and to evaluate the risk factors for the development of such occlusion.
Case-control study with prospective follow-up data from Danish national registries.
Four secondary referral centres covering about 80% of the Danish population (4.4 million).
1168 patients with photographically verified branch retinal vein occlusion and 116,800 controls alive and aged = 40 when the occlusion was diagnosed in the corresponding case.
The risk of comorbidity 10 years and 1 year before the diagnosis of branch retinal vein occlusion and the incident comorbidity in a mean period of seven years after the diagnosis, with odds ratios and incidence rate ratios adjusted for age, sex, and year of diagnosis.
Risk factors present 10 years and 1 year before the diagnosis of branch retinal vein occlusion included peripheral artery disease (odds ratio 1.83, 95% confidence interval 1.14 to 2.95), diabetes (1.74, 1.40 to 2.17) and arterial hypertension (2.16, 1.86 to 2.51). After the diagnosis, patients had an increased risk of developing arterial hypertension (incidence rate ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.15 to 1.57), diabetes (1.51, 1.17 to 2.04), congestive heart failure (1.41, 1.12 to 1.68), and cerebrovascular disease (1.49, 1.27 to 1.76).
Diabetes, hypertension, and peripheral artery disease are associated with an increased risk of developing branch retinal vein occlusion up to a decade later. Branch retinal vein occlusion was associated with an increased risk of subsequently developing hypertension, diabetes, congestive heart failure, and cerebrovascular disease, emphasising the importance of preventive initiatives. These results fit the assumption that branch retinal vein occlusion is a consequence of arterial thickening and that the arteriovenous crossing signs that precede it are hallmarks of arterial disease.
Notes
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Comment In: BMJ. 2012;345:e837323230220
PubMed ID
23204001 View in PubMed
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Comprehensive genotyping reveals RPE65 as the most frequently mutated gene in Leber congenital amaurosis in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284663
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2016 Jul;24(7):1071-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Galuh D N Astuti
Mette Bertelsen
Markus N Preising
Muhammad Ajmal
Birgit Lorenz
Sultana M H Faradz
Raheel Qamar
Rob W J Collin
Thomas Rosenberg
Frans P M Cremers
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2016 Jul;24(7):1071-9
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Denmark
Female
Heterozygote
Humans
Infant
Leber Congenital Amaurosis - genetics - pathology
Male
Mutation Rate
Mutation, Missense
Pedigree
RNA Splicing
cis-trans-Isomerases - genetics
Abstract
Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) represents the most severe form of inherited retinal dystrophies with an onset during the first year of life. Currently, 21 genes are known to be associated with LCA and recurrent mutations have been observed in AIPL1, CEP290, CRB1 and GUCY2D. In addition, sequence analysis of LRAT and RPE65 may be important in view of treatments that are emerging for patients carrying variants in these genes. Screening of the aforementioned variants and genes was performed in 64 Danish LCA probands. Upon the identification of heterozygous variants, Sanger sequencing was performed of the relevant genes to identify the second allele. In combination with prior arrayed primer extension analysis, this led to the identification of two variants in 42 of 86 cases (49%). Remarkably, biallelic RPE65 variants were identified in 16% of the cases, and one novel variant, p.(D110G), was found in seven RPE65 alleles. We also collected all previously published RPE65 variants, identified in 914 alleles of 539 patients with LCA or early-onset retinitis pigmentosa, and deposited them in the RPE65 Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD). The in silico pathogenicity assessment of the missense and noncanonical splice site variants, as well as an analysis of their frequency in ~60?000 control individuals, rendered 864 of the alleles to affect function or probably affect function. This comprehensive database can now be used to select patients eligible for gene augmentation or retinoid supplementation therapies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26626312 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost-effectiveness of early intervention in first-episode psychosis: economic evaluation of a randomised controlled trial (the OPUS study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118731
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;202(1):35-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Lene Halling Hastrup
Christian Kronborg
Mette Bertelsen
Pia Jeppesen
Per Jorgensen
Lone Petersen
Anne Thorup
Erik Simonsen
Merete Nordentoft
Author Affiliation
Region Zealand, Psychiatric Research Unit, Roskilde, Denmark. lhhs@regionsjaelland.dk
Source
Br J Psychiatry. 2013 Jan;202(1):35-41
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Community Mental Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Diagnosis-Related Groups - economics
Early Medical Intervention - economics
Family Therapy - economics
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Intention to Treat Analysis
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - economics
Patient Education as Topic - economics
Psychotic Disorders - economics - therapy
Schizophrenia - economics - therapy
Single-Blind Method
Socialization
Young Adult
Abstract
Information about the cost-effectiveness of early intervention programmes for first-episode psychosis is limited.
To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an intensive early-intervention programme (called OPUS) (trial registration NCT00157313) consisting of enriched assertive community treatment, psychoeducational family treatment and social skills training for individuals with first-episode psychosis compared with standard treatment.
An incremental cost-effectiveness analysis of a randomised controlled trial, adopting a public sector perspective was undertaken.
The mean total costs of OPUS over 5 years (€123,683, s.e. = 8970) were not significantly different from that of standard treatment (€148,751, s.e. = 13073). At 2-year follow-up the mean Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) score in the OPUS group (55.16, s.d. = 15.15) was significantly higher than in standard treatment group (51.13, s.d. = 15.92). However, the mean GAF did not differ significantly between the groups at 5-year follow-up (55.35 (s.d. = 18.28) and 54.16 (s.d. = 18.41), respectively). Cost-effectiveness planes based on non-parametric bootstrapping showed that OPUS was less costly and more effective in 70% of the replications. For a willingness-to-pay up to €50,000 the probability that OPUS was cost-effective was more than 80%.
The incremental cost-effectiveness analysis showed that there was a high probability of OPUS being cost-effective compared with standard treatment.
PubMed ID
23174515 View in PubMed
Less detail

The effect of five years versus two years of specialised assertive intervention for first episode psychosis - OPUS II: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136300
Source
Trials. 2011;12:72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Marianne Melau
Pia Jeppesen
Anne Thorup
Mette Bertelsen
Lone Petersen
Christian Gluud
Gertrud Krarup
Merete Nordentoft
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, Copenhagen University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Copenhagen, Denmark. marianne.melau@regionh.dk
Source
Trials. 2011;12:72
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cognitive Therapy
Community Mental Health Services
Crisis Intervention
Denmark
Family Therapy
Humans
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy, Group
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Research Design
Social Behavior
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The Danish OPUS I trial randomized 547 patients with first-episode psychosis to a two-year early-specialised assertive treatment programme (OPUS) versus standard treatment. The two years OPUS treatment had significant positive effects on psychotic and negative symptoms, secondary substance abuse, treatment adherence, lower dosage of antipsychotic medication, and a higher treatment satisfaction. However, three years after end of the OPUS treatment, the positive clinical effects were not sustained, except that OPUS-treated patients were significantly less likely to be institutionalised compared with standard-treated patients. The major objective of the OPUS II trial is to evaluate the effects of five years of OPUS treatment versus two years of OPUS treatment.
The OPUS II trial is designed as a randomized, open label, parallel group trial with blinded outcome assessment. Based on our sample size estimation, 400 patients treated in OPUS for two years will be randomized to further three years of OPUS treatment versus standard treatment. The specialized assertive OPUS treatment consists of three core elements: assertive community treatment, psycho-educational family treatment, and social skills training.
It has been hypothesized that there is a critical period from onset up to five years, which represents a window of opportunity where a long-term course can be influenced. Extending the specialized assertive OPUS treatment up to five years may allow the beneficial effects to continue beyond the high-risk period, through consolidation of improved social and functional outcome.
Clinical Trial.gov NCT00914238.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21392377 View in PubMed
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From research to practice: how OPUS treatment was accepted and implemented throughout Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268608
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2015 Apr;9(2):156-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Merete Nordentoft
Marianne Melau
Tina Iversen
Lone Petersen
Pia Jeppesen
Anne Thorup
Mette Bertelsen
Carsten Rygaard Hjorthøj
Lene Halling Hastrup
Per Jørgensen
Source
Early Interv Psychiatry. 2015 Apr;9(2):156-62
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Combined Modality Therapy
Community Mental Health Services
Denmark
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Family Therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient satisfaction
Program Development
Psychotic Disorders - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
The early phases of psychosis have been hypothesized to constitute a critical period, a window of opportunity. At the same time, the early phases of psychosis are associated with increased risk of unwanted outcome, such as suicidal behaviour and social isolation. This was the background for the emergence of early intervention services, and in Denmark, the OPUS trial was initiated as part of that process.
Modified assertive community treatment, together with family involvement and social skills training, constituted the core elements in the original programme. A total of 547 patients with first-episode psychosis were included in the trial.
To summarize briefly the results of the OPUS trial: the OPUS treatment was superior to standard treatment in reducing psychotic and negative symptoms and substance abuse, in increasing user satisfaction and adherence to treatment, and in reducing use of bed days and days in supported housing. Moreover, relatives included in the OPUS treatment were less strained and had a higher level of knowledge about schizophrenia and higher user satisfaction.
The OPUS treatment was implemented throughout Denmark. Training courses were developed and manuals and books were published. Regional health authorities had access to national grants for implementing early intervention services; as a result, OPUS teams were disseminated throughout the country. The content of the treatment is now further developed, and new elements are being tried out - such as individual placement and support, lifestyle changes, cognitive remediation, specialized treatment for substance abuse and different kinds of user involvement.
PubMed ID
24304658 View in PubMed
Less detail

Latent trajectories of trauma symptoms and resilience: the 3-year longitudinal prospective USPER study of Danish veterans deployed in Afghanistan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258741
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2014 Sep;75(9):1001-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Søren Bo Andersen
Karen-Inge Karstoft
Mette Bertelsen
Trine Madsen
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2014 Sep;75(9):1001-8
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Afghan Campaign 2001-
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Military Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Resilience, Psychological
Risk factors
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - epidemiology - etiology - psychology
Time Factors
Veterans - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify trajectories of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms from before to 2.5 years after deployment and to assess risk factors for symptom fluctuations and late-onset PTSD.
743 soldiers deployed to Afghanistan in 2009 were assessed for PTSD symptoms using the PTSD Checklist (PCL) at 6 occasions from predeployment to 2.5 years postdeployment (study sample = 561). Predeployment vulnerabilities and deployment and postdeployment stressors were also assessed.
Six trajectories were identified: a resilient trajectory with low symptom levels across all assessments (78.1%) and 5 trajectories showing symptom fluctuations. These included a trajectory of late onset (5.7%), independently predicted by earlier emotional problems (OR = 5.59; 95% CI, 1.57-19.89) and predeployment and postdeployment traumas (OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04-1.17 and OR = 1.13; 95% CI, 1.00-1.26). Two trajectories of symptom fluctuations in the low-to-moderate range (7.5% and 4.1%); a trajectory of symptom relief during deployment, but with a drastic increase at the final assessments (2.0%); and a trajectory with mild symptom increase during deployment followed by relief at return (2.7%) were also found. Symptom fluctuation was predicted independently by predeployment risk factors (depression [OR = 1.27; 95% CI, 1.16-1.39], neuroticism [OR = 1.10; 95% CI, 1.00-1.21], and earlier traumas [OR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.16]) and deployment-related stressors (danger/injury exposure [OR = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.04-1.40]), but not by postdeployment stressors.
The results confirm earlier findings of stress response heterogeneity following military deployment and highlight the impact of predeployment, perideployment, and postdeployment risk factors in predicting PTSD symptomatology and late-onset PTSD symptoms.
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Psychiatry. 2014 Sep;75(9):e956-725295442
Comment In: J Clin Psychiatry. 2014 Sep;75(9):e953-525295441
PubMed ID
25188895 View in PubMed
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Mortality in patients with central retinal vein occlusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107113
Source
Ophthalmology. 2014 Mar;121(3):637-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Mette Bertelsen
Allan Linneberg
Nynne Christoffersen
Henrik Vorum
Else Gade
Michael Larsen
Author Affiliation
National Eye Clinic for the Visually Impaired, Kennedy Center, Glostrup, Denmark; Department of Ophthalmology, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark; Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: mettebertelsen12@gmail.com.
Source
Ophthalmology. 2014 Mar;121(3):637-42
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fluorescein Angiography
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Photography
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Retinal Vein Occlusion - diagnosis - mortality
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To assess mortality in patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO).
Registry-based cohort study.
Four hundred thirty-nine photographically verified CRVO patients and a control cohort of 2195 unexposed subjects matched by age and gender and alive on the date CRVO was diagnosed in the corresponding case.
Data from nationwide registries were used to compare mortality rates in CRVO patients with a control cohort over a mean follow-up of 5.1 years for cases and of 5.7 years for controls.
Hazard ratios (HRs) obtained by Cox regression and standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) stratified by age and gender served as measures of relative mortality risk.
Mortality was higher in patients with CRVO (HR, 1.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19-1.76) than in the control cohort, adjusted for age, gender, and time of diagnosis. Mortality was comparable between the 2 groups (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.96-1.46) when adjusting for overall occurrence of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Subgroup analysis found that the age-stratified mortality rate was increased significantly in the total group of men (SMR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.03-1.56) and in women 60 to 69 years of age (SMR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.22-3.08).
Central retinal vein occlusion was associated with an overall increase in mortality compared with controls that was attributed statistically to cardiovascular disorders and diabetes. We recommend treatment of hypertension and diabetes, if present, and referral of patients found to have CRVO who are not already being treated by a primary care physician.
Notes
Comment In: Ophthalmology. 2014 Mar;121(3):619-2124581753
PubMed ID
24053999 View in PubMed
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[New treatments of hereditary blindness].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271896
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Sep 2;175(36):2038-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-2013
Author
Mette Bertelsen
Thomas Rosenberg
Michael Larsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2013 Sep 2;175(36):2038-42
Date
Sep-2-2013
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blindness - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrodes, Implanted
Eye Diseases, Hereditary - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - therapy
Genetic Therapy
Humans
Retinitis Pigmentosa - epidemiology - genetics - pathology - therapy
Retinoids - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Visual Prosthesis
Abstract
Ongoing clinical trials are targeting several previously intractable hereditary causes of blindness of congenital, childhood or early adulthood onset, mainly in the optic nerve and retina. The intended stage of initiation of the new therapeutic approaches ranges from neonatal life and a structurally intact retinal tissue to adult life with a complete loss of photoreceptors. It must be assumed that some of the trials will succeed in producing new therapies and action must be taken to refine and accelerate diagnostics and to preserve therapeutic potential in blind people.
PubMed ID
23992912 View in PubMed
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