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Can we move beyond burden and burnout to support the health and wellness of family caregivers to persons with dementia? Evidence from British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132042
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Meredith B Lilly
Carole A Robinson
Susan Holtzman
Joan L Bottorff
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. meredith.lilly@mcmaster.ca
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2012 Jan;20(1):103-12
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
British Columbia
Burnout, Professional - epidemiology
Caregivers - psychology
Dementia - therapy
Family - psychology
Family Relations
Female
Home Care Services
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Qualitative Research
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
After more than a decade of concerted effort by policy-makers in Canada and elsewhere to encourage older adults to age at home, there is recognition that the ageing-in-place movement has had unintended negative consequences for family members who care for seniors. This paper outlines findings of a qualitative descriptive study to investigate the health and wellness and support needs of family caregivers to persons with dementia in the Canadian policy environment. Focus groups were conducted in 2010 with 23 caregivers and the health professionals who support them in three communities in the Southern Interior of British Columbia. Thematic analysis guided by the constant comparison technique revealed two overarching themes: (1) forgotten: abandoned to care alone and indefinitely captures the perceived consequences of caregivers' failed efforts to receive recognition and adequate services to support their care-giving and (2) unrealistic expectations for caregiver self-care relates to the burden of expectations for caregivers to look after themselves. Although understanding about the concepts of caregiver burden and burnout is now quite developed, the broader sociopolitical context giving rise to these negative consequences for caregivers to individuals with dementia has not improved. If anything, the Canadian homecare policy environment has placed caregivers in more desperate circumstances. A fundamental re-orientation towards caregivers and caregiver supports is necessary, beginning with viewing caregivers as a critical health human resource in a system that depends on their contributions in order to function. This re-orientation can create a space for providing caregivers with preventive supports, rather than resorting to costly patient care for caregivers who have reached the point of burnout and care recipients who have been institutionalised.
PubMed ID
21851447 View in PubMed
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Do they care too much to work? The influence of caregiving intensity on the labour force participation of unpaid caregivers in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140548
Source
J Health Econ. 2010 Dec;29(6):895-903
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Meredith B Lilly
Audrey Laporte
Peter C Coyte
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics and Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University, Kenneth Taylor Hall, Rm 426, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M4, Canada. meredith.lilly@utoronto.ca
Source
J Health Econ. 2010 Dec;29(6):895-903
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Caregivers - economics - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Abstract
The recent growth of the home care sector combined with societal and demographic changes have given rise to concerns about the adequacy of the supply of family and friend caregivers. Potential caregivers face competing time pressures that pull them in the direction of the labour market on one hand, and towards unpaid caregiving duties on the other. This paper examines the influence of unpaid caregiving on the labour supply of a cohort of working-aged caregivers in Canada, with particular emphasis on caregiving intensity. Results suggest that caregivers are heterogeneous in both their caregiving inputs and associated labour market responses, thereby underscoring the importance of controlling for caregiving intensity when measuring labour supply. The negative influence of primary caregiving on labour supply appears to be at the level of labour force participation, rather than on hours of work or wages.
PubMed ID
20864197 View in PubMed
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The fiscal impact of informal caregiving to home care recipients in Canada: how the intensity of care influences costs and benefits to government.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116931
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Mar;81:102-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Josephine C Jacobs
Meredith B Lilly
Carita Ng
Peter C Coyte
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, University of Toronto, 155 College St., Toronto, Canada M5T 3M6. jo.jacobs@mail.utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Mar;81:102-9
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Caregivers - economics - statistics & numerical data
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment - economics
Federal Government
Female
Home Nursing - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Income Tax - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Social Welfare - economics
Time Factors
Abstract
The objective of this study was to estimate the annual costs and consequences of unpaid caregiving by Canadians from a government perspective. We estimated these costs both at the individual and population levels for caregivers aged 45 and older. We conducted a cost-benefit analysis where we considered the costs of unpaid caregiving to be potential losses in income tax revenues and changes in social assistance payments and the potential benefit of reduced paid care expenditures. Our costing methods were based on multivariate analyses using the 2007 General Social Survey, a cross-sectional survey of 23,404 individuals. We determined the differential probability of employment, wages, and hours worked by caregivers of varying intensity versus non-caregivers. We also used multivariate analysis to determine how receiving different intensities of unpaid care impacted both the probability of receiving paid care and the weekly hours of paid care received. At the lowest intensities of caregiving, there was a net benefit to government from caregiving, at both the individual and population levels. At the population level, the net benefit to government was estimated to be $4.4 billion for caregivers providing less than five hours of weekly care. At the highest intensity of caregiving, there was a net cost to government of $641 million. Our overall findings were robust to a number of changes applied in our sensitivity analysis. We found that the factor with the greatest impact on cost was the probability of labour force participation. As the biggest cost driver appears to be the higher likelihood of intense caregivers dropping out of the labour force, government policies that enable intense caregivers to balance caregiving with employment may help to mitigate these losses.
PubMed ID
23347496 View in PubMed
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Health care services use in assisted living: a time series analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113664
Source
Can J Aging. 2013 Jun;32(2):173-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Kimberlyn M McGrail
Meredith B Lilly
Margaret J McGregor
Anne-Marie Broemeling
Kia Salomons
Sandra Peterson
Rachael McKendry
Morris L Barer
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. kmcgrail@chspr.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2013 Jun;32(2):173-83
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Assisted Living Facilities - economics - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Female
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Male
Sex Distribution
Abstract
This article describes British Columbia's regulatory model for assisted living and used time series analysis to examine individuals' use of health care services before and after moving to assisted living. The 4,219 assisted living residents studied were older and predominantly female, with 73 per cent having one or more major chronic conditions. Use of health care services tended to increase before the move to assisted living, drop at the time of the move (most notably for general practitioners, medical specialists, and acute care), and remain low for the 12-month follow-up period. These apparent positive effects are not trivial; the cohort of 1,894 assisted living residents used 18,000 fewer acute care days in the year after, compared to the year before, their move. Future research should address whether and how assisted living affects longer-term pathways of care for older adults and ultimately their function and quality of life.
PubMed ID
23701920 View in PubMed
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