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An Evaluation of Cancer Education Webinars in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307951
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2019 Nov 27; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-27-2019
Author
Katie Cueva
Melany Cueva
Laura Revels
Michelle Hensel
Mark Dignan
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Dr., Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. kcueva@alaska.edu.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2019 Nov 27; :
Date
Nov-27-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Culturally relevant health promotion is an opportunity to reduce health inequities in the cancer burden, and online learning is an emerging avenue for health promotion. To address a desire for synchronous online cancer education, a project team offered ten 1-hr cancer education webinars for Alaska's rural tribal health workers. The project was guided by the framework of Community-Based Participatory Action Research, honored Indigenous Ways of Knowing, and was informed by Empowerment Theory. The evaluation of this community-based intervention included end-of-webinar surveys. Between February and April 2018, 41 surveys were completed by 11 unique participants. All participants reported that, as a result of the webinars, they planned both to change their own behavior to reduce cancer risk, and to talk with their patients more often about cancer prevention strategies such as screenings, physical activity, tobacco cessation, and eating healthy. While the webinars addressed desires for synchronous actions to support cancer learning, and led to intentions to positive change behaviors, the ten webinars engaged far fewer unique learners than the team's asynchronous cancer education modules. This experience may inform other cancer educators' efforts to develop, implement, and evaluate online learning opportunities. Despite the small numbers, these webinars resulted in increased learners' intent to reduce cancer risk behaviors, share cancer information, and improved learners' capacity to talk about cancer in their communities.
PubMed ID
31776892 View in PubMed
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Bridging storytelling traditions with digital technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107732
Source
Pages 270-275 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):270-275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Melany Cueva
Regina Kuhnley
Laura J Revels
Katie Cueva
Mark Dignan
Anne P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Community Health Aide Program,Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. mcueva@anthc.org
Source
Pages 270-275 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):270-275
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Community health workers
Curriculum
Female
Health Education - methods
Humans
Indians, North American - education
Inuits - education
Male
Medical Informatics - methods
Middle Aged
Narration
Neoplasms - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this project was to learn how Community Health Workers (CHWs) in Alaska perceived digital storytelling as a component of the "Path to Understanding Cancer" curriculum and as a culturally respectful tool for sharing cancer-related health messages.
A pre-course written application, end-of-course written evaluation, and internet survey informed this project.
Digital storytelling was included in seven 5-day cancer education courses (May 2009-2012) in which 67 CHWs each created a personal 2-3 minute cancer-related digital story. Participant-chosen digital story topics included tobacco cessation, the importance of recommended cancer screening exams, cancer survivorship, loss, grief and end-of-life comfort care, and self-care as patient care providers. All participants completed an end-of-course written evaluation. In July 2012, contact information was available for 48 participants, of whom 24 completed an internet survey.
All 67 participants successfully completed a digital story which they shared and discussed with course members. On the written post-course evaluation, all participants reported that combining digital storytelling with cancer education supported their learning and was a culturally respectful way to provide health messages. Additionally, 62 of 67 CHWs reported that the course increased their confidence to share cancer information with their communities. Up to 3 years post-course, all 24 CHW survey respondents reported they had shown their digital story. Of note, 23 of 24 CHWs also reported change in their own behavior as a result of the experience.
All CHWs, regardless of computer skills, successfully created a digital story as part of the cancer education course. CHWs reported that digital stories enhanced their learning and were a culturally respectful way to share cancer-related information. Digital storytelling gave the power of the media into the hands of CHWs to increase their cancer knowledge, facilitate patient and community cancer conversations, and promote cancer awareness and wellness.
Notes
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2009 Apr;10(2):186-9119372280
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012;71:1854322765934
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2011 Sep;26(3):522-921431464
PubMed ID
23984267 View in PubMed
Documents
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Cancer education for Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps) in Alaska assessing comfort with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3864
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(2):85-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Melany Cueva
Anne Lanier
Mark Dignan
Regina Kuhnley
Crystal Jenkins
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, 99508, USA. mcueva@anmc.org
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2005;20(2):85-8
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Clinical Competence
Community Health Aides - education
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasms
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Village-based Community Health Aides and Community Health Practitioners (CHA/Ps) are the primary providers of health care in rural Alaska. METHODS: We discuss the development and results of a CHA/P cancer self-assessment survey, which assessed comfort with cancer knowledge and providing cancer information. RESULTS: A total of 402 responses were received from a mailed questionnaire to 477 CHA/Ps. Respondents were predominantly Alaska Native women. Using a 5-point Likert scale from don't know to very comfortable, approximately 50% of CHA/Ps reported feeling "OK" when providing information about cancer risk factors, cancer screening, surviving cancer, and providing care and support. CHA/Ps reported feeling less comfortable with discussing cancer diagnosis, treatment, pain, and loss and grief.
PubMed ID
16083371 View in PubMed
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Co-Creating a Culturally Responsive Distance Education Cancer Course with, and for, Alaska's Community Health Workers: Motivations from a Survey of Key Stakeholders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294751
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2017 Sep; 32(3):426-431
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Katie Cueva
Laura Revels
Regina Kuhnley
Melany Cueva
Anne Lanier
Mark Dignan
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Dr, Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2017 Sep; 32(3):426-431
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Community Health Workers - education
Cultural Competency
Education, Distance - methods
Female
Health education
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Neoplasms
Program Development
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To gain input on a proposed culturally responsive, distance-delivered cancer education course informed by empowerment theory and adult-learning principles, Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps) and CHA/P leadership were invited to take an online survey in February 2015. The proposed course will be developed as part of the "Distance Education to Engage Alaskan Community Health Aides in Cancer Control" project. The results of the survey demonstrate that respondents are both interested in taking the proposed class and engaging in course development. The results also indicate that respondents have the technological comfort and capacity to be engaged in online learning and have primarily positive experiences and perceptions of distance education. This survey is the beginning of the interactive development of the online cancer education course and part of a continuing endeavor to promote wellness with, and for, Alaska's people by empowering Alaska's CHA/Ps and inspiring positive behavioral change to both prevent cancer and support those who feel its burdens.
Notes
Cites: Cancer. 2004 May 15;100(10):2093-103 PMID 15139050
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2005 Summer;20(2):85-8 PMID 16083371
Cites: J Cancer Educ. 2011 Sep;26(3):522-9 PMID 21431464
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 1995 Oct;23 (5):569-79 PMID 8851340
PubMed ID
26666680 View in PubMed
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Culturally-Relevant Online Education Improves Health Workers' Capacity and Intent to Address Cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289223
Source
J Community Health. 2018 Jan 24; :
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-2018
Author
Katie Cueva
Melany Cueva
Laura Revels
Mark Dignan
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Dr., Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. kcueva@alaska.edu.
Source
J Community Health. 2018 Jan 24; :
Date
Jan-24-2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Clinical Competence
Community Health Workers/education
Cultural Competency
Early Detection of Cancer
Education, Distance/organization & administration
Female
Health Promotion/organization & administration
Humans
Intention
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms/epidemiology
Primary Prevention/organization & administration
Rural Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
To address a desire for timely, medically-accurate cancer education in rural Alaska, ten culturally-relevant online learning modules were developed, implemented, and evaluated with, and for, Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps). The project was guided by the framework of Community-Based Participatory Action Research, honored Indigenous Ways of Knowing, and was informed by Empowerment Theory. Each learner was invited to complete an end-of-module evaluation survey. The survey asked about changes in intent to share cancer information with patients as a result of the module. In 1 year, August 1, 2016-July 31, 2017, 459 surveys were completed by 79 CHA/Ps. CHA/Ps reported that, because of the modules, they felt more knowledgeable about cancer, and more comfortable, confident, and prepared to talk about cancer with their patients, families, and communities. All learners shared that because of the modules, they intended to talk with their patients more often about cancer screenings, tobacco cessation, physical activity, or nutrition. These findings suggest that the application of this collaboratively developed, culturally-relevant, health promotion intervention has supported increased CHA/P capacity and intent to interact with patients about cancer. In the words of a learner: "Doing all these courses makes me a ton times more comfortable in talking about cancer with anyone. I didn't know too much about it at first but now I know a whole lot. Thank you".
PubMed ID
29368103 View in PubMed
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Digital storytelling: a tool for health promotion and cancer awareness in rural Alaskan communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277682
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28781
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Melany Cueva
Regina Kuhnley
Laura Revels
Nancy E Schoenberg
Mark Dignan
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:28781
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Awareness
Communication
Community Health Workers - education
Computers
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Narration
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Rural Population
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to learn community members' perspectives about digital storytelling after viewing a digital story created by a Community Health Aide/Practitioner (CHA/P).
Using a qualitative research design, we explored digital storytelling likeability as a health-messaging tool, health information viewers reported learning and, if viewing, cancer-related digital stories facilitated increased comfort in talking about cancer. In addition, we enquired if the digital stories affected how viewers felt about cancer, as well as if viewing the digital stories resulted in health behaviour change or intent to change health behaviour.
A total of 15 adult community members participated in a 30-45 minute interview, 1-5 months post-viewing of a CHA/P digital story. The majority (13) of viewers interviewed were female, all were Alaska Native and they ranged in age from 25 to 54 years with the average age being 40 years. Due to the small size of communities, which ranged in population from 160 to 2,639 people, all viewers knew the story creator or knew of the story creator. Viewers reported digital stories as an acceptable, emotionally engaging way to increase their cancer awareness and begin conversations. These conversations often served as a springboard for reflection, insight, and cancer-prevention and risk-reduction activities.
Notes
Cites: Alaska Med. 2001 Jul-Sep;43(3):61-9, 8311710084
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2009 Apr;10(2):186-9119372280
Cites: J Health Commun. 2010 Mar;15(2):114-3520390982
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2013 Jul;14(4):617-2323099660
Cites: Community Pract. 2014 Jan;87(1):28-3024597059
PubMed ID
26343881 View in PubMed
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Engaging Elements of Cancer-Related Digital Stories in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289851
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2016 09; 31(3):500-5
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
09-2016
Author
Melany Cueva
Regina Kuhnley
Laura Revels
Nancy E Schoenberg
Anne Lanier
Mark Dignan
Author Affiliation
Community Health Aide Program, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4000 Ambassador Dr., Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. mcueva@anthc.org.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2016 09; 31(3):500-5
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology
Communication
Community Health Workers - education
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health Education - methods
Humans
Male
Medical Informatics - methods
Middle Aged
Narration
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Young Adult
Abstract
The tradition of storytelling is an integral part of Alaska Native cultures that continues to be a way of passing on knowledge. Using a story-based approach to share cancer education is grounded in Alaska Native traditions and people's experiences and has the potential to positively impact cancer knowledge, understandings, and wellness choices. Community health workers (CHWs) in Alaska created a personal digital story as part of a 5-day, in-person cancer education course. To identify engaging elements of digital stories among Alaska Native people, one focus group was held in each of three different Alaska communities with a total of 29 adult participants. After viewing CHWs' digital stories created during CHW cancer education courses, focus group participants commented verbally and in writing about cultural relevance, engaging elements, information learned, and intent to change health behavior. Digital stories were described by Alaska focus group participants as being culturally respectful, informational, inspiring, and motivational. Viewers shared that they liked digital stories because they were short (only 2-3 min); nondirective and not preachy; emotional, told as a personal story and not just facts and figures; and relevant, using photos that showed Alaskan places and people.
Notes
Cites: Menopause Int. 2010 Jun;16(2):51-5 PMID 20729493
Cites: J Cancer Surviv. 2008 Mar;2(1):33-44 PMID 18648985
Cites: Educ Prim Care. 2009 Nov;20(6):441-4 PMID 20132639
Cites: Med Teach. 2008;30(8):774-7 PMID 18946821
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null PMID 23984267
Cites: Alaska Med. 2001 Jul-Sep;43(3):61-9, 83 PMID 11710084
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2004;25:439-55 PMID 15015929
Cites: Am J Health Behav. 2003 Nov-Dec;27 Suppl 3:S227-32 PMID 14672383
Cites: J Transcult Nurs. 2002 Jan;13(1):6-11 PMID 11776018
Cites: Health Promot Pract. 2013 Jul;14(4):617-23 PMID 23099660
PubMed ID
25865400 View in PubMed
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Evaluating arts-based cancer education using an internet survey among Alaska community health workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267849
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2014 Sep;29(3):529-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Melany Cueva
Katie Cueva
Mark Dignan
Anne Lanier
Regina Kuhnley
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2014 Sep;29(3):529-35
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Community Health Workers - education
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health education
Humans
Male
Medical Illustration - education
Medicine in Art
Young Adult
Abstract
Cancer, considered a rare disease among Alaska Native people as recently as the 1950s, surpassed heart disease in the 1990s to become the leading cause of mortality. In response to Alaska's village-based Community Health Workers' (CHWs) desire to learn more about cancer for themselves and the people in their communities, cancer education that incorporated the expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Arts-based education integrates the dynamic wisdom and experiences of Alaska Native people and western medical knowledge to share cancer information in a culturally respectful way. Between May 2009 and March 2013, 12 5-day courses that included arts activities to support cancer information were provided for 118 CHWs in Anchorage, AK, USA. A post-course internet survey was conducted in April 2013, to learn how arts-based cancer education affected participants' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Surveys were completed by 54 of the 96 course participants; 22 course participants were lost to follow-up. As a result of integrating the arts with cancer education, respondents reported an increase in their cancer knowledge and comfort with talking about cancer. Additionally, 82 % (44) of respondents described feeling differently about cancer. By integrating the arts with cancer information, participants reported healthy behavior changes for themselves (76 %), with their families (70 %), and in their work (72 %). The expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting provided a creative pathway for diverse adult learners in Alaska to increase their cancer knowledge, comfort with talking about cancer, and wellness behaviors.
PubMed ID
24189832 View in PubMed
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A Framework for Culturally Relevant Online Learning: Lessons from Alaska's Tribal Health Workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290623
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2018 Mar 22; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-22-2018
Author
Katie Cueva
Melany Cueva
Laura Revels
Anne P Lanier
Mark Dignan
K Viswanath
Teresa T Fung
Alan C Geller
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, 3211 Providence Dr., Anchorage, AK, 99508, USA. kcueva@alaska.edu.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2018 Mar 22; :
Date
Mar-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Culturally relevant health promotion is an opportunity to reduce health inequities in diseases with modifiable risks, such as cancer. Alaska Native people bear a disproportionate cancer burden, and Alaska's rural tribal health workers consequently requested cancer education accessible online. In response, the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium cancer education team sought to create a framework for culturally relevant online learning to inform the creation of distance-delivered cancer education. Guided by the principles of community-based participatory action research and grounded in empowerment theory, the project team conducted a focus group with 10 Alaska Native education experts, 12 culturally diverse key informant interviews, a key stakeholder survey of 62 Alaska Native tribal health workers and their instructors/supervisors, and a literature review on distance-delivered education with Alaska Native or American Indian people. Qualitative findings were analyzed in Atlas.ti, with common themes presented in this article as a framework for culturally relevant online education. This proposed framework includes four principles: collaborative development, interactive content delivery, contextualizing learning, and creating connection. As an Alaskan tribal health worker shared "we're all in this together. All about conversations, relationships. Always learn from you/with you, together what we know and understand from the center of our experience, our ways of knowing, being, caring." The proposed framework has been applied to support cancer education and promote cancer control with Alaska Native people and has motivated health behavior change to reduce cancer risk. This framework may be adaptable to other populations to guide effective and culturally relevant online interventions.
PubMed ID
29569143 View in PubMed
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Learning about cancer has brightened my light: cancer education for Alaska Community Health Aides and Community Health Practitioners (CHA/Ps).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135935
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2011 Sep;26(3):522-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Regina Kuhnley
Melany Cueva
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Anchorage, ANTHC-CHAP, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. ckuhnley@anthc.org
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2011 Sep;26(3):522-9
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Clinical Competence
Community Health Services - manpower
Community Health Workers - education
General practitioners
Health education
Humans
Learning
Neoplasms - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
In response to Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps) request for cancer information, the "Path to Understanding Cancer" course was developed, implemented, and extensively evaluated. Using a qualitative approach as one evaluation component, 128 of 168 course participants engaged in post-course telephone interviews. Of these, 116 (81%) CHA/Ps felt more comfortable in talking about cancer and 57% had increased cancer screening referrals for patients. Additionally, 28% of 110 CHA/P respondents and 21% of 114 CHA/Ps' family members sought and received cancer screening; they had also made lifestyle changes to reduce cancer risk, including tobacco cessation and healthy changes in nutrition and exercise. Through qualitative design, we gained insight into CHA/Ps' lived experience of cancer and an understanding of ways the course made a difference in patient care as well as cancer risk reduction, cancer screening, and prevention for themselves, their families, and people in their communities.
PubMed ID
21431464 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.