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The Interacting Axes of Environmental, Health, and Social Justice Cumulative Impacts: A Case Study of the Blueberry River First Nations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277127
Source
Healthcare (Basel). 2016 Oct 18;4(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-18-2016
Author
Maya K Gislason
Holly K Andersen
Source
Healthcare (Basel). 2016 Oct 18;4(4)
Date
Oct-18-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
We consider the case of intensive resource extractive projects in the Blueberry River First Nations in Northern British Columbia, Canada, as a case study. Drawing on the parallels between concepts of cumulative environmental and cumulative health impacts, we highlight three axes along which to gauge the effects of intensive extraction projects. These are environmental, health, and social justice axes. Using an intersectional analysis highlights the way in which using individual indicators to measure impact, rather than considering cumulative effects, hides the full extent by which the affected First Nations communities are impacted by intensive extraction projects. We use the case study to contemplate several mechanisms at the intersection of these axes whereby the negative effects of each not only add but also amplify through their interactions. For example, direct impact along the environmental axis indirectly amplifies other health and social justice impacts separately from the direct impacts on those axes. We conclude there is significant work still to be done to use cumulative indicators to study the impacts of extractive industry projects-like liquefied natural gas-on peoples, environments, and health.
PubMed ID
27763548 View in PubMed
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Voices from the landscape: Storytelling as emergent counter-narratives and collective action from northern BC watersheds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295443
Source
Health Place. 2018 Oct 12; 54:191-199
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-12-2018
Author
Maya K Gislason
Vanessa Sloan Morgan
Kendra Mitchell-Foster
Margot W Parkes
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, University of Northern British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Prince George, BC, Canada V2K5M4; Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6. Electronic address: maya_gislason@sfu.ca.
Source
Health Place. 2018 Oct 12; 54:191-199
Date
Oct-12-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The 'Ecohealth and Watersheds in Northern BC'' project, situated in a resource rich, settler colonial context, generated three digital stories at the request of the project's Steering Committee members that sought to connect health, environment, and community. Three Steering Committee members championed these stories from their distinct watersheds, resulting in emergent counter-narratives that respond directly to their social-ecological contexts. Nested in literature on blue and green spaces, we present and examine the process of storytelling as emergent counter-narrative and how these narratives challenge us to think of blue and green spaces in interconnected and nuanced ways.
PubMed ID
30321859 View in PubMed
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West Nile virus: the production of a public health pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119519
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Feb;35(2):188-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Maya K Gislason
Author Affiliation
Centre for Global Health Policy, University of Sussex, Brighton. maya.gislason@gmail.com
Source
Sociol Health Illn. 2013 Feb;35(2):188-99
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Government Regulation
Healthcare Disparities - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Knowledge Management
Pandemics - prevention & control
Population Surveillance
Power (Psychology)
Psychological Theory
Public Health Practice - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Risk Assessment - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - standards
Social Control, Informal
Systems Integration
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The West Nile virus (WNV), as it was presented in the texts and discourses on the Public Health Agency of Canada's (PHAC) website during its initial emergence, was an effect of the kinds of knowledge, techniques of power and disciplinary apparatuses that operate on that website and in society. With reference to Michel Foucault's relations of power, this article offers an approach for translating theories of power into techniques and technologies of power that can be used to conduct a social construction discourse analysis, and gives examples from the use of surveillance, normalisation, exclusion and regulation in PHAC's responses to the WNV epidemic in Canada. This study concludes with the assertion that shifting the ways in which social and political relations of power contour public health theories and practice is crucial. The present moment requires the development of global health responses to pandemics that are rooted less in the proliferation of apparatuses of control and more in epidemiological innovations and integrated, multi-perspectival research approaches to infectious diseases research, and in the governance of pandemic control and prevention initiatives.
PubMed ID
23095027 View in PubMed
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