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13 records – page 1 of 2.

5-year review of a unique multidisciplinary nonmelanoma skin cancer clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132764
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2011 Jul-Aug;15(4):220-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Shaelyn Culleton
Dale Breen
Dalal Assaad
Liying Zhang
Judith Balogh
May Tsao
Juhu Kamra
Greg Czarnota
Oleh Antonyshyn
Jeffery Fialkov
Elizabeth Barnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
J Cutan Med Surg. 2011 Jul-Aug;15(4):220-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Biopsy
Carcinoma, Basal Cell - pathology - therapy
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - pathology - therapy
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Skin Neoplasms - pathology - therapy
Abstract
A multidisciplinary nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) clinic is held weekly at our center, where all new patients are jointly assessed by dermatology/dermatopathology, radiation oncology, and plastic surgery. A new patient database was established in 2004. The purpose of this study was to provide a preliminary report on the patients seen in the NMSC clinic and the treatment recommendations rendered.
The new patient database was reviewed from January 2004 to December 2008, and patient demographics, tumor characteristics, and treatment recommendations were extracted. Cochran-Mantel-Harnszel (CMH) testing and chi-square analysis were used to detect any associations or relationships between variables within the database. A p value of less than .05 was considered significant.
During the 5-year study period, 2,146 new patients were seen in the NMSC clinic. The majority of patients presented with basal cell carcinoma (64%) or squamous cell carcinoma (22%), with a median tumor size of 1 to 2 cm (range 0 to > 9 cm). Tumors were located in the head and neck region (80%), extremities (14%), and torso (6%). Previous treatment included biopsy only (62%), surgery (20%), electrodesiccation and curettage (11%), topical imiquimod (3%), and radiotherapy (1%). Treatment recommendations included surgery (55%) (with either simple excision [31%] or excision with margin control under frozen-section guidance [24%]), radiotherapy (19%), topical imiquimod (10%), observation (7%), and electrodesiccation and curettage (4%).
The NMSC clinic at our center sees a high volume of patients who benefit from the multidisciplinary assessment provided. Treatment recommendations were based on patient and disease characteristics as well as patient preference.
PubMed ID
21781628 View in PubMed
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Complications of Gamma Knife surgery: an early report from 2 Canadian centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153270
Source
J Neurosurg. 2008 Dec;109 Suppl:2-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Shobhan Vachhrajani
Charbel Fawaz
David Mathieu
Cynthia Ménard
Michael D Cusimano
Fred Gentili
Mojgan Hodaie
Brendan Kenny
Abhaya V Kulkarni
Normand Laperriere
Michael Schwartz
May Tsao
Mark Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurosurgery, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Neurosurg. 2008 Dec;109 Suppl:2-7
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Diseases - complications - diagnosis - surgery
Canada
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Humans
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Radiosurgery - adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) is used to treat benign and malignant brain tumors, arteriovenous malformations, trigeminal neuralgia, and other conditions. Patients experience reduced neurological morbidity from GKS compared with open microneurosurgery, but risks of radiation injury and technical limitations persist. The authors report treatment complications from the early experience of 2 Canadian GKS programs in Toronto and Sherbrooke.
In Toronto, a prospective administrative database was searched for adverse events and incomplete treatment administrations. In Sherbrooke, data were acquired by chart review. Patients were accrued until August 1, 2007, and a total of 973 patients were included in this report.
During the radiosurgical procedure, 19 patients (2%) suffered anxiety or syncopal episodes, and 2 patients suffered acute coronary events. Treatments were incompletely administered in 12 patients (1.2%). Severe pain was a delayed complication: 8 patients suffered unexpected headaches, and 9 patients developed severe facial pain. New motor deficits developed in 11 patients, including edema-induced ataxia in 4 and one case of facial weakness after treatment of a vestibular schwannoma. Four patients required shunt placement for symptomatic hydrocephalus, and 16 patients suffered delayed seizures.
Gamma Knife surgery is a minimally invasive treatment modality for many intracranial diseases. Treatment is not risk free, and some patients will develop complications; these are likely to decrease as institutional experience matures. Expanding availability and indications necessitate discussion of these risks with patients considering treatment.
PubMed ID
19123881 View in PubMed
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Determining the incidence of pain flare following palliative radiotherapy for symptomatic bone metastases: results from three canadian cancer centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152980
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2009 Sep 1;75(1):193-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2009
Author
Amanda Hird
Edward Chow
Liying Zhang
Rebecca Wong
Jackson Wu
Emily Sinclair
Cyril Danjoux
May Tsao
Elizabeth Barnes
Andrew Loblaw
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2009 Sep 1;75(1):193-7
Date
Sep-1-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Bone Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Bone Neoplasms - radiotherapy - secondary
Breast Neoplasms - pathology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Pain Measurement
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology
Radiotherapy Dosage
Abstract
To determine the incidence of pain flare following radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases.
Patients with bone metastases treated with RT were eligible. Worst pain scores and analgesic consumption were collected before, daily during, and for 10 days after treatment. Pain flare was defined as a 2-point increase in the worst pain score (0-10) compared to baseline with no decrease in analgesic intake, or a 25% increase in analgesic intake with no decrease in worst pain score. Pain flare was distinguished from progression of pain by requiring the worst pain score and analgesic intake return to baseline levels after the increase/flare (within the 10-day follow-up period).
A total of 111 patients from three cancer centers were evaluable. There were 50 male and 61 female patients with a median age of 62 years (range, 40-89 years). The primary cancers were mainly breast, lung, and prostate. Most patients received a single 8 Gy (64%) or 20 Gy in five fractions (25%). The overall pain flare incidence was 44/111 (40%) during RT and within 10 days following the completion of RT. Patients treated with a single 8 Gy reported a pain flare incidence of 39% (27/70) and, with multiple fractions, 41% (17/41).
More than one third of the enrolled patients experienced a pain flare. Identifying at-risk individuals and managing potential pain flares is crucial to achieve an optimal level of care.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2010 Oct 1;78(2):637; author reply 63720832666
PubMed ID
19167840 View in PubMed
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Do elderly patients with metastatic cancer have worse quality of life scores?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129678
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2012 Sep;20(9):2121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Kaitlin Koo
Liang Zeng
Emily Chen
Liying Zhang
Shaelyn Culleton
Kristopher Dennis
Amanda Caissie
Janet Nguyen
Lori Holden
Florencia Jon
May Tsao
Elizabeth Barnes
Cyril Danjoux
Arjun Sahgal
Edward Chow
Author Affiliation
Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2012 Sep;20(9):2121-7
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Neoplasms - radiotherapy - secondary
Brain Neoplasms - radiotherapy - secondary
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Self Report
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to compare self-reported quality of life (QOL) scores in old and young patients with metastatic cancer using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C15-PAL questionnaire.
Patients receiving palliative radiotherapy (RT) for bone metastases and brain metastases completed the QLQ-C15-PAL questionnaire prior to treatment. Using multiple linear regression analysis, a parametric test, the QLQ-C15-PAL scores were compared using 65 and 70 years as cutoff ages.
A total of 340 patients were referred for palliative RT for bone metastases (n = 190) or brain metastases (n = 150). Physical functioning and appetite were worse in the older group using either 65 or 70 years as the cutoff age. Age-related differences in the QLQ-C15-PAL scores varied as a function of age cutoff used and location of metastatic site irradiated.
Based on the (EORTC) QLQ-C15-PAL, elderly advanced cancer patients have a different QOL profile. Similar observations have been reported with the (EORTC) QLQ-C30 questionnaire.
PubMed ID
22081058 View in PubMed
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Edmonton symptom assessment scale as a prognosticative indicator in patients with advanced cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137715
Source
J Palliat Med. 2011 Mar;14(3):337-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Liang Zeng
Liying Zhang
Shaelyn Culleton
Florencia Jon
Lori Holden
Justin Kwong
Luluel Khan
May Tsao
Cyril Danjoux
Arjun Sahgal
Elizabeth Barnes
Edward Chow
Author Affiliation
Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto , Canada.
Source
J Palliat Med. 2011 Mar;14(3):337-42
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - physiopathology - radiotherapy
Ontario
Prognosis
Questionnaires - standards
Sickness Impact Profile
Survival Analysis
Terminally ill
Abstract
Few studies incorporate patient self-assessment scales in prognostic models of survival prediction. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) is commonly used as a symptom screening tool in cancer patients.
The goal of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of the ESAS for survival prediction in the advanced cancer population.
Patients completed the ESAS and demographic information prior to palliative radiotherapy consultation and at follow-up at the Odette Cancer Centre between 1999 and 2009. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) methodology was applied to analyze ESAS trends within the last months of life. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measurements was used to characterize trends between time periods.
ESAS records (2377) from 808 patients (433 male and 375 female) were included in this cohort. Median age was 68 years (range 32-95) with median Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of 60 (range 10-100). Primary cancer sites were of the lung (36%), breast (20%), and prostate (19%). All nine ESAS symptoms significantly deteriorated in the last 4 weeks immediately before death when compared with those scores in the preceding months. At one week prior to death, the worst ESAS symptoms experienced by patients were fatigue, appetite, and well-being with mean scores of 7.4, 6.9, and 6.1, respectively.
All ESAS scores significantly worsened in the last 4 weeks prior to death compared with those in the previous months. Sudden deterioration of the global ESAS symptoms may predict impending death. Future studies on a prognostic model should incorporate both ESAS symptom severity and trends.
PubMed ID
21254813 View in PubMed
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Has pain management in cancer patients with bone metastases improved? A seven-year review at an outpatient palliative radiotherapy clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157014
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Jan;37(1):77-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Andrea M Kirou-Mauro
Amanda Hird
Jennifer Wong
Emily Sinclair
Elizabeth A Barnes
May Tsao
Cyril Danjoux
Edward Chow
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2009 Jan;37(1):77-84
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care
Analgesics - administration & dosage
Arthralgia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Bone Neoplasms - radiotherapy - secondary
Canada - epidemiology
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Female
Hip Joint - drug effects
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Radiotherapy, Conformal - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The primary objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of underdosage of analgesics for pain associated with bone metastases in outpatients referred to the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program at the Odette Cancer Centre from 1999 to 2006. A prospective database containing data for all patients with bone metastases who were referred to the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program for palliative radiotherapy from 1999 to 2006 was analyzed. The database included patient demographic information, including age at referral for radiation to the bone, gender, primary cancer site, and Karnofsky Performance Status; information on treatment-related factors, such as worst pain ratings and analgesic consumption in the past 24 hours (recorded as oral morphine equivalent doses); pain intensity ratings (none [rating=0], mild [rating=1-4], moderate [rating=5-6] or severe [rating=7-10]; and analgesic consumption (rated as none, nonopioids, weak opioids [e.g., codeine] and strong opioids [e.g., morphine and hydromorphone]). Patients who experienced moderate or severe pain and were prescribed no pain medication, nonopioids, or weak opioids were considered to be undermedicated. Between January 1999 and December 2006, 1,038 patients were included in the study database. Approximately 56% of patients were male and 44% were female. The median age was 68 years (range 28-95) and the median Karnofsky Performance Status was 70 (range 10-100). The percentages of undermedicated patients were 40% in 1999, 34% in 2000, 29% in 2001, 37% in 2003, 39% in 2004, 36% in 2005, and 48% in 2006. No appreciable decline was noted in the proportion of patients with moderate-to-severe pain who received no pain medication, nonopioids, or weak opioids during the study period. Despite the publication of pain management guidelines and the dissemination of data regarding the proportion of patients with bone metastases who are being prescribed inadequate analgesics, our findings suggest that a significant proportion of patients continue to be undermedicated.
PubMed ID
18504094 View in PubMed
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Is response to radiotherapy in patients related to the severity of pretreatment pain?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156558
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2008 Jul 15;71(4):1208-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2008
Author
Andrea Kirou-Mauro
Amanda Hird
Jennifer Wong
Emily Sinclair
Elizabeth A Barnes
May Tsao
Cyril Danjoux
Edward Chow
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2008 Jul 15;71(4):1208-12
Date
Jul-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiotherapy - secondary
Comorbidity
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pain Measurement - statistics & numerical data
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The primary objective of this study was to determine whether there is a relationship between the severity of pretreatment pain and response to palliative radiotherapy (RT) for painful bone metastases.
The database for patients with bone metastases seen at the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program at the Odette Cancer Center from 1999 to 2006 was analyzed. The proportion of patients with mild (scores 1-4), moderate (scores 5-6), or severe (scores 7-10) pain at baseline who experienced a complete response, partial response, stable response, or progressive response after palliative RT was determined according to International Bone Metastases Consensus definitions.
During the 7-year study period 1,053 patients received palliative radiation for bone metastases. The median age was 68 years and the median Karnofsky performance status was 70. Of the patients, 53% had a complete or partial response at 1 month, 52% at 2 months, and 54% at 3 months post-RT.
There was no significant difference in terms of the proportion of responders (patients with complete or partial response) and nonresponders in terms of painful bone metastases among patients presenting with mild, moderate, or severe pain. Patients with moderate pain should be referred for palliative RT.
PubMed ID
18572084 View in PubMed
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Minimal clinically important differences in the Edmonton symptom assessment system in patients with advanced cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118699
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 Aug;46(2):192-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Gillian Bedard
Liang Zeng
Liying Zhang
Natalie Lauzon
Lori Holden
May Tsao
Cyril Danjoux
Elizabeth Barnes
Arjun Sahgal
Michael Poon
Edward Chow
Author Affiliation
Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 Aug;46(2):192-200
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Causality
Comorbidity
Fatigue - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - radiotherapy
Ontario - epidemiology
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology
Patient Outcome Assessment
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Longitudinal symptom monitoring is important in the setting of patients with advanced cancer. Scores over time may naturally fluctuate, although a patient may feel the same.
The purpose of this study was to determine the minimal levels of change required to be clinically relevant (minimal clinically important difference [MCID]) using the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS).
Between 1999 and 2009, patients completed the ESAS before palliative radiotherapy and at follow-up. MCIDs were calculated using both the anchor- and distribution-based methods for improvement and deterioration; 95% confidence intervals for the differences in mean change scores between adjacent categories also were calculated.
A total of 276 patients completed the ESAS at baseline and during at least one follow-up visit. At the four-week follow-up, decrease of 1.2 and 1.1 units in pain and depression scales, respectively, constituted clinically relevant improvement, whereas increase of at least 1.4, 1.8, 1.1, 1.1, and 1.4 units, respectively, in pain, tiredness, depression, anxiety, and appetite loss items were required for deterioration. At the subsequent follow-ups, these values were similar. Overall, the MCID for improvement tended to be smaller than that for deterioration. The distribution-based method estimates tended to be larger than the 0.3 SD estimates, but closer to the 0.5 SD estimates.
MCIDs allow health care professionals to determine the success of treatment in improving the patient's quality of life. MCIDs may prompt health care professionals to intervene with new treatment. Future studies should confirm our findings with a variety of anchors.
Notes
Comment In: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 Mar;45(3):e4-523465763
PubMed ID
23177724 View in PubMed
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The palliative performance scale: examining its inter-rater reliability in an outpatient palliative radiation oncology clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154587
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2009 Jun;17(6):685-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Sarah Campos
Liying Zhang
Emily Sinclair
May Tsao
Elizabeth A Barnes
Cyril Danjoux
Arjun Sahgal
Philiz Goh
Shaelyn Culleton
Gunita Mitera
Edward Chow
Author Affiliation
Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Odette Cancer Center, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5, Canada.
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2009 Jun;17(6):685-90
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ambulatory Care - methods
Cancer Care Facilities
Female
Humans
Karnofsky Performance Status
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Observer Variation
Ontario - epidemiology
Palliative Care
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) was developed by the Victoria Hospice Society in 1996 to modernize the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Currently, it is being used to measure palliative patient performance status in a variety of settings. Despite its widespread use, only one study has examined the inter-rater reliability of the PPS.
To examine the inter-rater reliability of the PPS in measuring performance status in patients seen in an outpatient palliative radiation oncology clinic
Performance status for 102 consecutive patients was assessed by an oncologist (MD), a radiation therapist (RT), and a research assistant (RA) in the Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program at the Odette Cancer Centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Raters' scores were analyzed for correlation and compared to evaluate the inter-rater reliability of the PPS tool.
Excellent correlation was found between the scores rated by the MD and RA (r = 0.86); good correlation was observed between scores rated by the MD and RT (r = 0.69) and the RT and RA (r = 0.77). Scores between all three raters, as well as between rater pairs, were also found to have good reliability as measured by the Chronbach's alpha coefficient. Significant results were obtained for the range of PPS scores in which the majority of our patients fell: 40-80%.
PPS was shown to have good overall inter-rater reliability in an outpatient palliative setting, but more research is needed to establish the validity and reliability of the tool in a variety of different palliative settings.
PubMed ID
18946683 View in PubMed
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Prospective assessment of patient-rated symptoms following whole brain radiotherapy for brain metastases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173660
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2005 Jul;30(1):18-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Edward Chow
Lori Davis
Lori Holden
May Tsao
Cyril Danjoux
Author Affiliation
Rapid Response Radiotherapy Program, Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Center, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2005 Jul;30(1):18-23
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Brain Neoplasms - mortality - radiotherapy - secondary
Comorbidity
Dexamethasone - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Pain - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Pain Measurement - methods
Palliative Care - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Radiotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To prospectively assess patient-rated symptoms in patients with brain metastases treated with whole brain radiotherapy, these patients were asked to rate their symptoms on the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) before, and 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks following the radiation treatment. ESAS evaluates pain, fatigue, nausea, depression, anxiety, drowsiness, appetite, sense of well-being, and shortness of breath on a scale of 0-10 (0=absence of symptom and 10=worst possible symptom). Patients with a language barrier or significant cognitive impairment were excluded. The mean difference of ESAS symptoms at each follow up were compared with baseline and P or =10% over the last 6 months). All patients were prescribed dexamethasone at varying doses during radiotherapy. The dose fractionations were 20 Gy in 5 fractions, 138 (81%); 30 Gy in 10 fractions, 7 (4%); and others, 25 (15%). The baseline mean +/- SD for ESAS scores were: pain 2.4 +/- 2.8, fatigue 5.3 +/- 2.8, nausea 1.3 +/- 2.2, depression 2.8 +/- 2.7, anxiety 3.6 +/- 3.0, drowsiness 3.5 +/- 2.9, appetite 3.0 +/- 3.2, sense of well-being 3.8 +/- 2.7, and shortness of breath 2.3 +/- 2.5. For the entire cohort, after the delivery of palliative radiotherapy for brain metastases, there were statistically significant deteriorations in the mean differences from the baseline for the following ESAS domains: fatigue 1.0 to 1.8; drowsiness 1.2 to 1.8; and appetite 2.2 to 2.4. The data demonstrate that certain parameters of quality of life worsen after whole brain radiotherapy.
PubMed ID
16043003 View in PubMed
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13 records – page 1 of 2.