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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
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Causes of death in Canadian Forces members deployed to Afghanistan and implications on tactical combat casualty care provision.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129125
Source
J Trauma. 2011 Nov;71(5 Suppl 1):S401-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Dylan Pannell
Ronald Brisebois
Max Talbot
Vincent Trottier
Julien Clement
Naisan Garraway
Vivian McAlister
Homer C Tien
Author Affiliation
2 Field Ambulance, Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, Petawawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 2011 Nov;71(5 Suppl 1):S401-7
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Afghan Campaign 2001-
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Delivery of Health Care - methods
Female
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Military Medicine - organization & administration
Military Personnel
Retrospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Abstract
As part of its contribution to the Global War on Terror and North Atlantic Treaty Organization's International Security Assistance Force, the Canadian Forces deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan, in 2006. We have studied the causes of deaths sustained by the Canadian Forces during the first 28 months of this mission. The purpose of this study was to identify potential areas for improving battlefield trauma care.
We analyzed autopsy reports of Canadian soldiers killed in Afghanistan between January 2006 and April 2008. Demographic characteristics, injury data, location of death within the chain of evacuation, and cause of death were determined. We also determined whether the death was potentially preventable using both explicit review and implicit review by a panel of trauma surgeons.
During the study period, 73 Canadian Forces members died in Afghanistan. Their mean age was 29 (+/-7) years and 98% were male. The predominant mechanism of injury was explosive blast, resulting in 81% of overall deaths during the study period. Gunshot wounds and nonblast-related motor vehicle collisions were the second and third leading mechanisms of injury causing death. The mean Injury Severity Score was 57 (+/-24) for the 63 study patients analyzed. The most common cause of death was hemorrhage (38%), followed by neurologic injury (33%) and blast injuries (16%). Three deaths were deemed potentially preventable on explicit review, but implicit review only categorized two deaths as being potentially preventable.
The majority of combat-related deaths occurred in the field (92%). Very few deaths were potentially preventable with current Tactical Combat Casualty interventions. Our panel review identified several interventions that are not currently part of Tactical Combat Casualty that may prevent future battlefield deaths.
PubMed ID
22071995 View in PubMed
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Knee dislocations: experience at the Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur de Montréal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181294
Source
Can J Surg. 2004 Feb;47(1):20-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Max Talbot
Greg Berry
Julio Fernandes
Pierre Ranger
Author Affiliation
Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Que.
Source
Can J Surg. 2004 Feb;47(1):20-4
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Knee Dislocation - etiology - rehabilitation - surgery
Knee Injuries - complications - diagnosis
Male
Middle Aged
Orthopedic Procedures - methods
Pain Measurement
Patient satisfaction
Physical Therapy Modalities - methods
Posterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries - surgery
Postoperative Care
Quebec
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Recovery of Function
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Although many options exist for ligament reconstruction in knee dislocations, the optimal treatment remains controversial. Allografts and autografts have both been used to reconstruct the cruciate ligaments. We present the results of reconstruction using artificial ligaments at Hôpital du Sacré-Coeur in Montréal.
We reviewed the treatment of all patients with knee dislocations seen between June 1996 and October 1999. The Lysholm score, ACL-quality of life (QoL) questionnaire, physical examination and Telos instrumented laxity measurement were used to evaluate the results.
Twenty patients (21 knees) participated in the study. The mean (and standard deviation [SD]) Lysholm score was 71.7 (18). Results from the ACL-QoL questionnaire showed a global impairment in QoL. Mean (and SD) range of motion and flexion were 118 degrees (10.9 degrees) and 2 degrees (2.9 degrees) respectively. Mean (and SD) radiologic laxity evaluated with Telos for the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments were 6.1 (5.7) mm and 7.3 (4.5) mm respectively.
Knee reconstruction with artificial ligaments shows promise, but further studies are necessary before it can be recommended for widespread use. This is the first study to show specifically a severe impairment in QoL in this patient population.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14997920 View in PubMed
Less detail

Spinal injuries after improvised explosive device incidents: implications for Tactical Combat Casualty Care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129123
Source
J Trauma. 2011 Nov;71(5 Suppl 1):S413-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Sean Comstock
Dylan Pannell
Max Talbot
Lisa Compton
Nicholas Withers
Homer C Tien
Author Affiliation
Canadian Forces Health Services, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 2011 Nov;71(5 Suppl 1):S413-7
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Afghan Campaign 2001-
Blast Injuries - epidemiology - surgery - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, Military
Humans
Incidence
Male
Military Medicine - methods
Military Personnel
Orthopedic Procedures - methods
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology - surgery - therapy
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
Tactical Combat Casualty Care aims to treat preventable causes of death on the battlefield but deemphasizes the importance of spinal immobilization in the prehospital tactical setting. However, improvised explosive devices (IEDs) now cause the majority of injuries to Canadian Forces (CF) members serving in Afghanistan. We hypothesize that IEDs are more frequently associated with spinal injuries than non-IED injuries and that spinal precautions are not being routinely employed on the battlefield.
We examined retrospectively a database of all CF soldiers who were wounded and arrived alive at the Role 3 Multinational Medical Unit in Kandahar, Afghanistan, from February 7, 2006, to October 14, 2009. We collected data on demographics, injury mechanism, anatomic injury descriptions, physiologic data on presentation, and prehospital interventions performed. Outcomes were incidence of any spinal injuries.
Three hundred seventy-two CF soldiers were injured during the study period and met study criteria. Twenty-nine (8%) had spinal fractures identified. Of these, 41% (n = 12) were unstable, 31% (n = 9) stable, and 28% indeterminate. Most patients were injured by IEDs (n = 212, 57%). Patients injured by IEDs were more likely to have spinal injuries than those injured by non-IED-related mechanisms (10.4% vs. 2.3%; p
PubMed ID
22071997 View in PubMed
Less detail