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Are cardiorespiratory fitness and walking performance associated with self-reported quality of life and work ability?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160866
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):257-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Lars Sörensen
Sari Honkalehto
Mauri Kallinen
Mika Pekkonen
Veikko Louhevaara
Juhani Smolander
Markku Alén
Author Affiliation
Suomen Terveystalo Oy, Vaajakoskentie 125, FIN-40800 Vaajakoski, Finland. lars.sorensen@fimnet.fi
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):257-64
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking
Abstract
In Finland, testing cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) is popular in health promotion programs and work ability evaluations. The most common instruments used for this purpose are the submaximal cycle ergometer test, and the 2-km walking test. However, limited data exist on the associations between VO2max and wellbeing in working age adults. The aim of the study was to evaluate how the measured (cycle ergometer) and the estimated (walking test) VO2max and walking performance are associated with health-related quality of life and work ability.
The subjects were 104 middle-aged men workers (45-55 years old), mostly from the construction and manufacturing industries. VO2max was directly measured by a maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. The 2-km walking test parameters were the walking time, predicted VO2max, and fitness index. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the RAND-36 questionnaire which was further divided into physical dimensions (P-RAND-36) and mental dimensions (M-RAND-36). Perceived work ability was assessed with the work ability index (WAI) in a subgroup of 51 subjects.
The 2-km walking test parameters significantly predicted the score on P-RAND-36 (r2=0.18, p=0.001), and correlated significantly with WAI. The directly measured VO2max was not associated with P-RAND-36, M-RAND-36 or WAI.
The inexpensive 2-km walking test may be more useful when evaluating the quality of life and work ability, compared to the more expensive direct measurement of one's cardiorespiratory fitness in a laboratory.
PubMed ID
17932015 View in PubMed
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Effect of a social intervention of choice vs. control on depressive symptoms, melancholy, feeling of loneliness, and perceived togetherness in older Finnish people: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293092
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2018 Jan; 22(1):77-84
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
Jan-2018
Author
Katja Pynnönen
Timo Törmäkangas
Taina Rantanen
Pirjo Tiikkainen
Mauri Kallinen
Author Affiliation
a Gerontology Research Center and Department of Health Sciences , University of Jyväskylä , Jyväskylä , Finland.
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2018 Jan; 22(1):77-84
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Aged
Aging - psychology
Counseling - methods
Depression - therapy
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Loneliness - psychology
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
This study examined effects of a social intervention on depressive symptoms, melancholy, loneliness, and perceived togetherness in community-dwelling Finnish older people.
Promotion of mental well-being in older people (GoodMood; ISRCTN78426775) was a single-blinded randomized control trial lasting 1.5 years. Two hundred and twenty-three persons aged 75-79 years reporting symptoms of loneliness or melancholy were randomized into intervention and control groups. The intervention group was allowed to choose among supervised exercise, social activity, or personal counseling. Follow-up measurements were conducted at the end of 6-month intervention, and at 3, 6, and 12 months post intervention.
Number of depressive symptoms remained unchanged, while loneliness and melancholy decreased in both the intervention and control groups during the study (p
PubMed ID
27657351 View in PubMed
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Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140384
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2011 Aug;23(4):273-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Janne Sallinen
Minna Mänty
Raija Leinonen
Mauri Kallinen
Timo Törmäkangas
Eino Heikkinen
Taina Rantanen
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Centre for Interdisciplinary Gerontology, Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland. janne.sallinen@vtt.fi
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2011 Aug;23(4):273-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Gait
Housing for the Elderly
Humans
Male
Models, Biological
Posture
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Walking
Abstract
The relative contribution of different domains on walking speed is largely unknown. This study investigated the central factors associated with maximal walking speed among older people.
Cross-sectional analyses of baseline data from the SCAMOB study (ISRCTN 07330512) involving 605 community-living ambulatory adults aged 75-81 years. Maximal walking speed, leg extensor power, standing balance and body mass index were measured at the research center. Physical activity, smoking, use of alcohol, chronic diseases and depressive symptoms were self-reported by standard questionnaires.
The mean maximal walking speed was 1.4 m/s (range 0.3-2.9). In linear regression analysis, age, gender and body mass index explained 11% of the variation in maximal walking speed. Adding leg extensor power and standing balance into the model increased the variation explained to 38%. Further adjusting for physical activity, smoking status and use of alcohol increased the variation explained by an additional 7%. A minor further increase in variability explained was gained by adding chronic diseases and depressive symptoms to the model. In the final model, the single most important factors associated with walking speed were leg extensor power, standing balance and physical activity, and these associations were similar in men and women and in different body mass index categories.
Lower extremity impairment and physical inactivity were the central factors associated with slow walking speed among older people, probably because these factors capture the influences of health changes and other life-style factors, potentially leading to walking limitations.
PubMed ID
20881453 View in PubMed
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Health, functioning and accessibility among spinal cord injury population in Finland: Protocol for the FinSCI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300138
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2019 Apr 01; 51(4):273-280
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-01-2019
Author
Susanna Tallqvist
Heidi Anttila
Mauri Kallinen
Eerika Koskinen
Harri Hämäläinen
Anna-Maija Kauppila
Anni Täckman
Aki Vainionpää
Jari Arokoski
Sinikka Hiekkala
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, 00014 Helsinki, Finland. susannatallqvist@gmail.com.
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2019 Apr 01; 51(4):273-280
Date
Apr-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Female
Finland
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health
Male
Research Design
Spinal Cord Injuries - rehabilitation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The purpose of the Finnish Spinal Cord Injury Study (FinSCI) is to identify factors related to the health and functioning of people with spinal cord injury, their challenges with accessibility, and how such factors are interconnected. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is used as a structured framework in the study.
Protocol of mixed methods study.
Study participants were recruited from all 3 SCI outpatient clinics in Finland. The final target group consists of 1,789 subjects with spinal cord injury. The final questionnaire was formed from 5 different patient-reported instruments. The spinal cord injury-specified instruments are the Spinal Cord Injury Secondary Condition Scale, the Spinal Cord Independence Measure, and the Nottwil Environmental Factors Inventory Short Form. In addition, questions from the following generic instruments were chosen after a selection process: the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System, PROMIS®, and the National Study of Health, Well-being and Service, FinSote. Altogether, the final questionnaire covers 64 ICF categories and consists of 151 ICF-linked questions.
The formulated questionnaire covers widely different aspects of health, functioning and accessibility. The questionnaire results and subsequent interviews will help in developing care and rehabilitation policies and services for people with spinal cord injury.
PubMed ID
30805657 View in PubMed
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Health-related quality of life and physical activity in persons at high risk for type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154048
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(10):799-805
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Arja Häkkinen
Anna Kukka
Tanja Onatsu
Salme Järvenpää
Ari Heinonen
Heikki Kyröläinen
Pablo Tomas-Carus
Mauri Kallinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Central Finland Health Care District, Jyväskylä, Finland. arja.hakkinen@ksshp.fi
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2009;31(10):799-805
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of persons at risk for type 2 diabetes to that of the Finnish general population. In addition, the associations between physical activity and HRQOL at-risk persons were studied.
One hundred thirty-two at-risk persons were recruited from health care centres in Central Finland. Participants filled out questionnaires including demographic characteristics, HRQOL (SF-36), frequency of vigorous physical activity (
PubMed ID
19034723 View in PubMed
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Long-term Posttraumatic Survival of Spinal Fracture Patients in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298610
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2018 12 01; 43(23):1657-1663
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-01-2018
Author
Ville Niemi-Nikkola
Nelli Saijets
Henriikka Ylipoussu
Pietari Kinnunen
Juha Pesälä
Pirkka Mäkelä
Markku Alen
Mauri Kallinen
Aki Vainionpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2018 12 01; 43(23):1657-1663
Date
12-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cause of Death
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Fractures - mortality
Survival Rate
Young Adult
Abstract
A retrospective epidemiological study.
To reveal the long-term survival and causes of death after traumatic spinal fracture (TSF) and to determine the possible factors predicting death.
Increased mortality following osteoporotic spinal fracture has been represented in several studies. Earlier studies concerning mortality after TSF have focused on specific types of fractures, or else only the mortality of the acute phases has been documented. In-hospital mortality has varied between 0.1% and 4.1%.
The study sample of 947 patients including all patients with TSF admitted to Oulu University Hospital, Finland, between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011. TSFs were identified using International Classification of Diseases 10th revision or Nordic Classification of Surgical Procedures codes and all patient records were manually reviewed. Times and causes of death, obtained from Statistics Finland's Archive of Death Certificates, were available until the end 2016 and 2015, respectively.
At the end of the follow-up 227 (24.0%) had died. Mortality was 6.8% after the first year and 19.1% after 5 years. Mortality was increased in all age groups compared with the general population, 1-year standardized mortality ratios ranging from 3.1 in over 65-year-olds to 19.8 in under 30-year-olds. In age groups of 50 to 64 years and over 65 years, the most important risk factors for death were males with hazard ratios of 3.0 and 1.6, respectively, and low fall as trauma mechanism with hazard ratios of 9.4 and 10.2, respectively.
Traumatic spinal fractures are associated with increased mortality compared with the general population, high mortality focusing especially on older people and men. The increase seems to be comparable to the increase following hip fracture. Patients who sustain spinal fracture due to falling need special attention in care, due to the observation that low fall as trauma mechanism increased the risk of death significantly.
3.
PubMed ID
29664815 View in PubMed
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Long-term Posttraumatic Survival of Spinal Fracture Patients in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291270
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2018 Apr 16; :
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-16-2018
Author
Ville Niemi-Nikkola
Nelli Saijets
Henrikka Ylipoussu
Pietari Kinnunen
Juha Pesälä
Pirkka Mäkelä
Markku Alen
Mauri Kallinen
Aki Vainionpää
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2018 Apr 16; :
Date
Apr-16-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
A retrospective epidemiological study.
To reveal the long-term survival and causes of death after traumatic spinal fracture (TSF) and to determine the possible factors predicting death.
Increased mortality following osteoporotic spinal fracture has been represented in several studies. Earlier studies concerning mortality after TSF have focused on specific types of fractures, or else only the mortality of the acute phases has been documented. In-hospital mortality has varied between 0.1% and 4.1%.
The study sample of 947 patients including all patients with TSF admitted to Oulu University Hospital, Finland, between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2011. TSFs were identified using International Classification of Diseases 10th revision or Nordic Classification of Surgical Procedures codes and all patient records were manually reviewed. Times and causes of death, obtained from Statistics Finland's Archive of Death Certificates, were available until the end 2016 and 2015, respectively.
At the end of the follow-up 227 (24.0%) had died. Mortality was 6.8% after the first year and 19.1% after 5 years. Mortality was increased in all age groups compared with the general population, 1-year standardized mortality ratios ranging from 3.1 in over 65-year-olds to 19.8 in under 30-year-olds. In age groups of 50 to 64 years and over 65 years, the most important risk factors for death were males with hazard ratios of 3.0 and 1.6, respectively, and low fall as trauma mechanism with hazard ratios of 9.4 and 10.2, respectively.
Traumatic spinal fractures are associated with increased mortality compared with the general population, high mortality focusing especially on older people and men. The increase seems to be comparable to the increase following hip fracture. Patients who sustain spinal fracture due to falling need special attention in care, due to the observation that low fall as trauma mechanism increased the risk of death significantly.
3.
PubMed ID
29664815 View in PubMed
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Promoting mobility after hip fracture (ProMo): study protocol and selected baseline results of a year-long randomized controlled trial among community-dwelling older people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129064
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:277
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Sarianna Sipilä
Anu Salpakoski
Johanna Edgren
Ari Heinonen
Markku A Kauppinen
Marja Arkela-Kautiainen
Sanna E Sihvonen
Maija Pesola
Taina Rantanen
Mauri Kallinen
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Centre, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. sarianna.sipila@jyu.fi
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2011;12:277
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Biomechanical Phenomena
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Hip Fractures - diagnosis - physiopathology - rehabilitation
Hip Joint - physiopathology
Humans
Independent living
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Physical Therapy Modalities
Program Evaluation
Range of Motion, Articular
Recovery of Function
Research Design
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To cope at their homes, community-dwelling older people surviving a hip fracture need a sufficient amount of functional ability and mobility. There is a lack of evidence on the best practices supporting recovery after hip fracture. The purpose of this article is to describe the design, intervention and demographic baseline results of a study investigating the effects of a rehabilitation program aiming to restore mobility and functional capacity among community-dwelling participants after hip fracture.
Population-based sample of over 60-year-old community-dwelling men and women operated for hip fracture (n = 81, mean age 79 years, 78% were women) participated in this study and were randomly allocated into control (Standard Care) and ProMo intervention groups on average 10 weeks post fracture and 6 weeks after discharged to home. Standard Care included written home exercise program with 5-7 exercises for lower limbs. Of all participants, 12 got a referral to physiotherapy. After discharged to home, only 50% adhered to Standard Care. None of the participants were followed-up for Standard Care or mobility recovery. ProMo-intervention included Standard Care and a year-long program including evaluation/modification of environmental hazards, guidance for safe walking, pain management, progressive home exercise program and physical activity counseling. Measurements included a comprehensive battery of laboratory tests and self-report on mobility limitation, disability, physical functional capacity and health as well as assessments for the key prerequisites for mobility, disability and functional capacity. All assessments were performed blinded at the research laboratory. No significant differences were observed between intervention and control groups in any of the demographic variables.
Ten weeks post hip fracture only half of the participants were compliant to Standard Care. No follow-up for Standard Care or mobility recovery occurred. There is a need for rehabilitation and follow-up for mobility recovery after hip fracture. However, the effectiveness of the ProMo program can only be assessed at the end of the study.
Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN53680197.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22145912 View in PubMed
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Sense of coherence: effect on adherence and response to resistance training in older people with hip fracture history.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115151
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):138-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Erja Portegijs
Sanna Read
Inka Pakkala
Mauri Kallinen
Ari Heinonen
Taina Rantanen
Markku Alen
Ilkka Kiviranta
Sanna Sihvonen
Sarianna Sipilä
Author Affiliation
Gerontology Research Center and Dept. of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
J Aging Phys Act. 2014 Jan;22(1):138-45
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Finland
Hip Fractures - physiopathology - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Independent living
Male
Mobility Limitation
Muscle Strength - physiology
Needs Assessment
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Resistance Training - methods - statistics & numerical data
Sense of Coherence
Social Support
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Our aim was to study the effects of sense of coherence (SOC) on training adherence and interindividual changes in muscle strength, mobility, and balance after resistance training in older people with hip fracture history. These are secondary analyses of a 12-week randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training in 60- to 85-year-old community-dwelling people 0.5-7 years after hip fracture (n = 45; ISRCTN34271567). Pre- and posttrial assessments included SOC, knee extension strength, walking speed, timed up-and-go (TUG), and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). Group-by-SOC interaction effects (repeated-measures ANOVA) were statistically significant for TUG (p = .005) and BBS (p = .040), but not for knee extension strength or walking speed. Weaker SOC was associated with poorer training adherence (mixed model; p = .009). Thus, more complicated physical tasks did not improve in those with weaker SOC, independently of training adherence. Older people with weaker SOC may need additional psychosocial support in physical rehabilitation programs to optimize training response.
PubMed ID
23538559 View in PubMed
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Traumatic Spinal Injuries in Northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282002
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2017 Apr 24;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-2017
Author
Ville Niemi-Nikkola
Nelli Saijets
Henriikka Ylipoussu
Pietari Kinnunen
Juha Pesälä
Pirkka Mäkelä
Markku Alen
Mauri Kallinen
Aki Vainionpää
Source
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2017 Apr 24;
Date
Apr-24-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A retrospective epidemiological study.
To reveal incidence and epidemiological features of traumatic spinal injuries (TSI) in Northern Finland.
In Finland the annual incidence of traumatic spine fractures requiring inpatient care has been found to be 27/100 000, while international incidences have varied across the range of 16-64/100 000. More specific epidemiological data from Finland is not available. Internationally, the most common mechanisms of injury are road traffic as well as low and high falls. Associated injuries occur in 30-55% of cases.
The study sample included patients with traumatic spinal injury admitted to Oulu University Hospital (OYS) with injury between the 1 of January 2007 and 31 of December 2011. Patient information was collected from the hospital care register, including all inpatient and outpatient visits and surgical procedures. Traumatic spinal column and spinal cord injuries were identified using ICD-10 or NCSP codes and all patient records were manually reviewed.
971 patients met the criteria for TSI. The mean annual incidence of hospitalised traumatic spinal injuries was 26/100 000 in the whole of Northern Finland and 35/100 000 in the OYS main responsibility area. The most frequent aetiology of TSI was low falls, which accounted for 35.8% of the injuries, followed by road traffic and high falls. Lumbar spine was the most common site of the fracture. Spinal surgery was performed in 376 (38.7%) cases. 308 patients (31.7%) suffered from associated injuries (ASOI), 101 (10.4%) had a spinal cord injury and 71 (7.3%) a brain injury.
Low falls in elderly and road traffic injuries in younger age groups were the most common aetiology of traumatic spinal injuries in Northern Finland and should be given more attention in primary prevention.
3.
PubMed ID
28441317 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.