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A 25-year follow-up of a population screened with faecal occult blood test in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161415
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Nea Malila
Matti Hakama
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Finnish Cancer Registry, Institute for Statistical and Epidemiological Cancer Research, Liisankatu 21 B, FI-001 70 Helsinki, Finland. nea.malila@cancer.fi
Source
Acta Oncol. 2007;46(8):1103-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Feasibility Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Occult Blood
Patient compliance
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of and possible selection to attend in colorectal cancer screening.
During the years 1979-1980, 1 785 men and women (born in 1917-1929) were invited to a pilot screening project for colorectal cancer. The screening method used was a guaiac-based faecal occult blood test repeated once if the initial test was positive.
Compliance was 69% and the test was positive in 19% of those attending. In a record linkage with the Finnish Cancer Registry, 47 colorectal cancer cases and 24 deaths from colorectal cancer were observed by the end of 2004. In all, the particular test method was not regarded specific enough for population screening. There was, however, no difference in cancer incidence between those who complied and those who did not when compared to the general population of same age and gender.
Compliance was found high enough to make screening feasible and there was no self selection of persons with low cancer risk to attend screening.
PubMed ID
17851857 View in PubMed
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Alternative technologies in cervical cancer screening: a randomised evaluation trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167012
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:252
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ahti Anttila
Matti Hakama
Laura Kotaniemi-Talonen
Pekka Nieminen
Author Affiliation
Mass Screening Registry, Finnish Cancer Registry, Liisankatu 21 B, FI-00170 Helsinki, Finland. ahti.anttila@cancer.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:252
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cytological Techniques
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Mass Screening - methods - organization & administration
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Papillomavirus Infections - pathology
Precancerous Conditions - pathology
Program Evaluation - methods
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Abstract
Cervical cancer screening programmes have markedly reduced the incidence and mortality rates of the disease. A substantial amount of deaths from the disease could be prevented further by organised screening programmes or improving currently running programmes.
We present here a randomised evaluation trial design integrated to the Finnish cervical cancer screening programme, in order to evaluate renewal of the programme using emerging technological alternatives. The main aim of the evaluation is to assess screening effectiveness, using subsequent cancers as the outcome and screen-detected pre-cancers as surrogates. For the time being, approximately 863,000 women have been allocated to automation-assisted cytology, human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing, or to conventional cytology within the organised screening programme. Follow-up results on subsequent cervical cancers will become available during 2007-2015.
Large-scale randomised trials are useful to clarify effectiveness and cost-effectiveness issues of the most important technological alternatives in the screening programmes for cervical cancer.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17042938 View in PubMed
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Bidirectional relationship between depression and erectile dysfunction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165643
Source
J Urol. 2007 Feb;177(2):669-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Rahman Shiri
Juha Koskimäki
Teuvo L J Tammela
Jukka Häkkinen
Anssi Auvinen
Matti Hakama
Author Affiliation
Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. r_shiri@yahoo.com
Source
J Urol. 2007 Feb;177(2):669-73
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Depression - complications - epidemiology
Erectile Dysfunction - complications - epidemiology
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
We specified the interrelationship between depressive mood and erectile dysfunction.
The target population consisted of men who were 50, 60 or 70 years old and residing in the study area in Finland in 1994. Questionnaires were mailed to 3,143 men in 1994 and to 2,837 men 5 years later. The followup sample consisted of 1,683 men who responded to the baseline and followup questionnaires.
Erectile dysfunction was strongly associated with untreated and treated depressive symptoms. The prevalence OR adjusted for potential confounders was 2.6 (95% CI 1.8-3.8) for untreated and 3.3 (95% CI 1.6-7.1) for treated depressive symptoms at the beginning of followup. The incidence of erectile dysfunction was 59/1,000 person-years (95% CI 39-90) in men with depressive mood and 37/1,000 person-years (95% CI 32-43) in those free of the disorder. Compared with men free of depressive symptoms who did not use medication for psychological disorders at study entry the adjusted incidence density ratio of erectile dysfunction was 4.5 (95% CI 2.2-9.2) in men with treated depressive symptoms and 1.2 (0.7-2.1) in those with untreated depressive symptoms. The incidence of depressive mood was 20/1,000 person-years in men with erectile dysfunction and 11/1,000 person-years in those free of erectile dysfunction. The adjusted incidence density ratio of depressive mood was 1.9 (95% CI 1.1-3.3) in men with erectile dysfunction compared with those free of it at entry.
Moderate or severe depressive mood or antidepressant medication use may cause erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction independently may cause or exacerbate depressive mood.
PubMed ID
17222655 View in PubMed
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Both high and low levels of blood vitamin D are associated with a higher prostate cancer risk: a longitudinal, nested case-control study in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18093
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 1;108(1):104-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2004
Author
Pentti Tuohimaa
Leena Tenkanen
Merja Ahonen
Sonja Lumme
Egil Jellum
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Sverre Harvei
Timo Hakulinen
Tapio Luostarinen
Joakim Dillner
Matti Lehtinen
Matti Hakama
Author Affiliation
Medical School, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Pentti.Tuohimaa@uta.fi
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Jan 1;108(1):104-8
Date
Jan-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Calcifediol - blood
Case-Control Studies
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sweden
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications
Abstract
Vitamin D inhibits the development and growth of prostate cancer cells. Epidemiologic results on serum vitamin D levels and prostate cancer risk have, however, been inconsistent. We conducted a longitudinal nested case-control study on Nordic men (Norway, Finland and Sweden) using serum banks of 200,000 samples. We studied serum 25(OH)-vitamin D levels of 622 prostate cancer cases and 1,451 matched controls and found that both low (/=80 nmol/l) 25(OH)-vitamin D serum concentrations are associated with higher prostate cancer risk. The normal average serum concentration of 25(OH)-vitamin D (40-60 nmol/l) comprises the lowest risk of prostate cancer. The U-shaped risk of prostate cancer might be due to similar 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) availability within the prostate: low vitamin D serum concentration apparently leads to a low tissue concentration and to weakened mitotic control of target cells, whereas a high vitamin D level might lead to vitamin D resistance through increased inactivation by enhanced expression of 24-hydroxylase. It is recommended that vitamin D deficiency be supplemented, but too high vitamin D serum level might also enhance cancer development.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2004 Sep 1;111(3):468; author reply 46915221979
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2004 Sep 1;111(3):470-1; author reply 47215221981
PubMed ID
14618623 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence among Finnish nuclear reactor workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189300
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jul;44(7):634-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
Anssi Auvinen
Eero Pukkala
Hannu Hyvönen
Matti Hakama
Tapio Rytömaa
Author Affiliation
STUK-Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, PO Box 14, FIN-00881 Helsinki, Finland. anssi.auvinen@uta.fi
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jul;44(7):634-8
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Nuclear Reactors
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Abstract
Because of their well-documented exposures to repeated low doses of ionizing radiation, nuclear reactor workers offer an opportunity to assess cancer risk from low-dose radiation. A cohort of all 15,619 Finnish nuclear reactor workers was established through dose-monitoring records. A questionnaire survey revealed no substantial differences in consumption of tobacco or alcohol between different exposure groups nor between nuclear power company employees and contract workers. In the follow-up for cancer incidence, no clear excess in cancer incidence was observed overall, nor was any observed in any of the specific cancer types studied. There was little evidence for an association between cancer incidence and cumulative radiation dose, but the statistical power was limited. More precise estimates will be available from an international collaborative study of nuclear industry workers, including our cohort.
PubMed ID
12134527 View in PubMed
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Cancer incidence in multiple sclerosis: a 35-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178795
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2004 Sep-Oct;23(5):224-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marja-Liisa Sumelahti
Eero Pukkala
Matti Hakama
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, School of Public Health, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. memasu@uta.fi
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2004 Sep-Oct;23(5):224-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Progressive - complications - epidemiology
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - complications - epidemiology
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
The risk of cancer among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients was evaluated emphasising cancers with a potentially infectious aetiology. Cancer incidence was estimated among incident MS patients in 1964-1993 (n = 1,597) in Finland. The cohort was followed up for cancer incidence through the Finnish Cancer Registry until 1999. A total of 85 cancer cases were diagnosed showing a standardised incidence ratio (SIR) of 1.0 (95% CI 0.8-1.2) for all cancers. The risk (SIR) of haematological tumours was 1.1 and that of central nervous system (CNS) tumours 1.3. The small excess risk of haematological malignancies is consistent with infectious aetiology, whereas the association between MS and CNS tumours may be due to misclassification.
Notes
Comment In: Neuroepidemiology. 2005;25(4):21216210863
PubMed ID
15316248 View in PubMed
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Causes of death among patients with multiple sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140942
Source
Mult Scler. 2010 Dec;16(12):1437-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Marja-Liisa Sumelahti
Matti Hakama
Irina Elovaara
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Tampere, Finland. marja-liisa.sumelahti@uta.fi
Source
Mult Scler. 2010 Dec;16(12):1437-42
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Cause of Death
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - mortality
Abstract
Several studies show a high mortality risk among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).
In this study, mortality and underlying causes of death were analysed among patients with MS diagnosed between 1964-1993 in Finland (n = 1595).
Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for both genders. The follow-up was based on linkage to the national computerized Cause-of-Death Register of Statistics Finland.
Altogether, 464 deaths were recorded by the end of 2006. The SMR as compared with the general population among females was 3.4 (95% confidence interval 3.0-3.9) and among males 2.2 (1.9-2.6). In total, 270 patients (58%) died from MS; only one of these deaths occurred during the first 2 years after the MS diagnosis. Mortality was also increased for other natural causes of death (n = 160) in patients followed for more than 10 years (SMR 1.4, 1.2-1.7), with a significant increase in deaths from influenza (29, 6.0-85), pneumonia (4.7, 2.5-8.0) and gastrointestinal causes (4.4, 2.3-7.7). The SMR for violent causes was 1.2 (0.7-1.9) and for alcohol-related deaths 0.2 (0.02-0.7). The SMR for suicides was 1.7 (0.9-2.7).
The MS population has an increased disease mortality, while the increase in the risk of accidents and suicides is not significantly increased among patients with MS in Finland.
PubMed ID
20826526 View in PubMed
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Cervical cancer patterns with automation-assisted and conventional cytological screening: a randomized study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140726
Source
Int J Cancer. 2011 Mar 1;128(5):1204-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2011
Author
Ahti Anttila
Arun Pokhrel
Laura Kotaniemi-Talonen
Matti Hakama
Nea Malila
Pekka Nieminen
Author Affiliation
Mass Screening Registry, Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki, Finland. ahti.anttila@cancer.fi
Source
Int J Cancer. 2011 Mar 1;128(5):1204-12
Date
Mar-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Automation
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
The purpose was to evaluate alternative cytological screening methods in population-based screening for cervical cancer up to cancer incidence and mortality outcome. Automation-assisted screening was compared to conventional cytological screening in a randomized design. The study was based on follow-up of 503,391 women invited in the Finnish cervical cancer screening program during 1999-2003. The endpoints were incident cervical cancer, severe intraepithelial neoplasia and deaths from cervical cancer. One third of the women had been randomly allocated to automation-assisted screening and two thirds to conventional cytology. Information on cervical cancer and severe neoplasia were obtained through 1999-2007 from a linkage between screening and cancer registry files. There were altogether 3.2 million woman-years at risk, and the average follow-up time was 6.3 years. There was no difference in the risk of cervical cancer between the automation-assisted and conventional screening methods; the relative risk (RR) of cervical cancer between the study and control arm was 1.00 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.76-1.29) among all invited and 1.08 (95% CI = 0.76-1.51) among women who were test negative at entry. Comparing women who were test negative with nonscreened, RR of cervical cancer incidence was 0.26, 95% CI = 0.19-0.36 and of mortality 0.24 (0.13-0.43). Both methods were valid for screening. Because cervical cancer is rare in our country, we cannot rule out small differences between methods. Evidence on alternative methods for cervical cancer screening is increasing and it is thus feasible to evaluate new methods in large-scale population-based screening programs up to cancer outcome.
PubMed ID
20848590 View in PubMed
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Changes in prevalence of urinary symptoms in Finnish men--a population-based 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175744
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2004;38(5):378-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Jukka Häkkinen
Juha Koskimäki
Heini Huhtala
Teuvo L J Tammela
Matti Hakama
Anssi Auvinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. jukka.hakkinen@fimnet.fi
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2004;38(5):378-84
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Comorbidity
Confidence Intervals
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Probability
Prostatic Hyperplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Urination Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
To describe changes in the prevalence and severity of urinary symptoms and the degree of interference they cause in the daily life of the Finnish male population by means of a 5-year follow-up study.
A postal survey of a stratified random population sample of elderly men in Pirkanmaa County was carried out in 1994 and 1999. A total of 3143 men in 1994 and 2837 in 1999 received the questionnaire; 2198 (70%) and 2133 (75%) responded, respectively. The questionnaire included items on sociodemographic status, overall health and diseases, urinary symptoms (Danish Prostatic Symptom Score), sexual function and bothersomeness of symptoms. Data from those individuals who responded adequately to both inquiries were analysed.
The most prevalent urinary symptoms were post-micturition dribble (64%), nocturia (62%), hesitancy (50%) and incomplete emptying (46%). At the 5-year follow-up, the prevalences of hesitancy, incomplete emptying, nocturia, urge incontinence and stress incontinence had increased statistically significantly. Subjects who had been symptomatic at baseline reported no change in 46-77% of cases, deterioration in 2-19% and improvement in 16-52%. The degree of interference in daily activities due to urinary symptoms increased significantly during follow-up. The mean interference index increased from 2.3 to 4.4.
Although urinary symptoms in elderly males are particularly common and their prevalence increases with age, they are mostly mild and also have a marked tendency to improve with time. The total burden of urinary symptoms nonetheless increases with age in the elderly male population.
PubMed ID
15764248 View in PubMed
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Chlamydial antibodies and risk of prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17190
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Feb;14(2):385-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Tarja Anttila
Leena Tenkanen
Sonja Lumme
Maija Leinonen
Randi Elin Gislefoss
Göran Hallmans
Steinar Thoresen
Timo Hakulinen
Tapio Luostarinen
Pär Stattin
Pekka Saikku
Joakim Dillner
Matti Lehtinen
Matti Hakama
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Feb;14(2):385-9
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Case-Control Studies
Chlamydia Infections - complications - diagnosis
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology
Chlamydophila Infections - complications - diagnosis
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We assessed the risk of prostate cancer by exposure to Chlamydia trachomatis. METHOD: Seven hundred thirty eight cases of prostate cancer and 2,271 matched controls were identified from three serum sample banks in Finland, Norway, and Sweden by linkage to the population based cancer registries. RESULTS: A statistically significant inverse association (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.94) was found. It was consistent by different serotypes and there was a consistent dose-response relationship. CONCLUSION: C. trachomatis infection is not likely to increase the risk of prostate cancer. Whether the inverse relationship is true or due to difficulties in measuring the true exposure in prostatic tissue by serology, confounders or other sources of error remain open.
PubMed ID
15734962 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.