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Characteristics of Indigenous adults with poorly controlled diabetes in north Queensland: implications for services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262054
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:325
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
David Ross Johnson
Robyn Anne McDermott
Peter Marshall Clifton
Katina D'Onise
Sean Matthew Taylor
Cilla Louise Preece
Barbara Anne Schmidt
Source
BMC Public Health. 2015;15:325
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Indigenous Australian adults with diabetes continue to have suboptimal clinical control and poorer outcomes compared with non-Indigenous people although there is a paucity of data documenting the detailed health status of Indigenous people in Australia. To further investigate the characteristics of Indigenous Australian adults with poorly controlled diabetes we analysed baseline data from a cluster randomized trial aiming to deliver a program of integrated community-based intensive chronic disease management for Indigenous people in remote communities in far north Queensland, Australia.
Indigenous adults aged 18 to 65 years from 12 clinics in rural north Queensland with established type 2 diabetes and with HbA1c =8.5% were invited to participate. The primary outcome variable measured at baseline was HbA1c. Other variables measured included socio-demographic indicators, health literacy, BMI, blood pressure, lipids, renal function, smoking status and quality of life measures. Data were collected between December 2010 and July 2011. Analysis was performed by ethnicity - Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.
One hundred and ninety three participants were included in the analysis. Very high rates of albuminuria, high rates of smoking, dyslipidaemia, hypertension and elevated BMI were recorded. Aboriginal participants reported higher levels of socio-economic disadvantage, higher smoking rates, lower BMI and worse self-reported health status than Torres Strait Islander participants.
These results demonstrate a high potential for improved culturally sound community-based management of diabetes and other comorbid conditions in this very high risk population. They also provide further evidence for including albuminuria in cardiovascular risk calculation.
PubMed ID
25884441 View in PubMed
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Cost-effectiveness of dasatinib versus high-dose imatinib in patients with Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML), resistant to standard dose imatinib--a Swedish model application.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142303
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Aug;49(6):851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Ola Ghatnekar
Frida Hjalte
Matthew Taylor
Author Affiliation
IHE, The Swedish Institute for Health Economics, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 2010 Aug;49(6):851-8
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Drug Costs
Female
Humans
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive - drug therapy - economics
Male
Markov Chains
Middle Aged
Protein Kinase Inhibitors - economics
Pyrimidines - administration & dosage - economics
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Sweden
Thiazoles - administration & dosage - economics
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a progressive disease, consisting of three phases, chronic, accelerated and blast phase. Treatment with imatinib has demonstrated high response rates and improved prognosis for patients with CML. The emergence of imatinib resistance is a major concern. Dasatinib is an oral kinase inhibitor of BCR-ABL that has been developed for treating CML patients across all phases of disease who are resistant or intolerant to imatinib.
The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of dasatinib versus high-dose imatinib treatment in chronic phase CML patients, resistant to lower doses of imatinib (
PubMed ID
20615173 View in PubMed
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Sex work and the public health impacts of the 2010 Olympic Games.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125965
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2012 Jun;88(4):301-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Kathleen N Deering
Jill Chettiar
Keith Chan
Matthew Taylor
Julio Sg Montaner
Kate Shannon
Author Affiliation
Division of AIDS, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2012 Jun;88(4):301-3
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Prostitution - statistics & numerical data
Public Health
Snow Sports - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The authors examined the impact of exposure to the 2010 Winter Olympics time period on outcomes measuring disruption of local sex work environments in Vancouver, Canada.
The authors conducted a before-and-after study, using multivariable logistic regression, to assess the relationship between exposure to the Olympics period (19 January-14 March 2010) versus the post-Olympics period (1 April-1 July 2010) and outcomes.
This study included 207 youth (14+ years) and adult sex workers (SWs) (Olympics: n=107; post-Olympics: n=100). SWs in the two periods were statistically similar, with an overall median age of 33 years (IQR: 28-40), and 106 (51.2%) of indigenous ancestry or ethnic minority. In separate multivariable logistic regression models, the Olympics period remained statistically significantly associated with perceived heightened police harassment of SWs without arrest (adjusted ORs (AOR): 3.95, 95% CIs 1.92 to 8.14), decreased availability of clients (AOR: 1.97, 95% CIs 1.11 to 3.48) and increased difficulty meeting clients due to road closures/construction (AOR: 7.68, 95% CIs 2.46 to 23.98). There were no significantly increased odds in perceived reports of new (0.999), youth (0.536) or trafficked SWs (zero reports) in the Olympic period.
To reduce potential adverse public health impacts of enhanced police harassment and displacement of local sex work markets, results suggest that evidence-based public health strategies need to be adopted for host cities of future events (eg, the London 2012 Olympic Games), such as the removal of criminal sanctions targeting sex work and the piloting and rigorous evaluation of safer indoor work spaces.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19(2):140-718207725
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2009 Apr;99(4):659-6519197086
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(12):e2836322163298
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 2002 Winter;30(4):548-5912561263
PubMed ID
22436199 View in PubMed
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