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Association between perfluoroalkyl substances and thyroid stimulating hormone among pregnant women: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107424
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12(1):76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Yan Wang
Anne P Starling
Line S Haug
Merete Eggesbo
Georg Becher
Cathrine Thomsen
Gregory Travlos
Debra King
Jane A Hoppin
Walter J Rogan
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Human Services, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Durham, NC, USA. wangy13@niehs.nih.gov.
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12(1):76
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alkanes - blood
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure
Environmental monitoring
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Immunoassay
Linear Models
Norway
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Thyrotropin - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) are a group of highly persistent chemicals that are widespread contaminants in wildlife and humans. Exposure to PFAS affects thyroid homeostasis in experimental animals and possibly in humans. The objective of this study was to examine the association between plasma concentrations of PFASs and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) among pregnant women.
A total of 903 pregnant women who enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study from 2003 to 2004 were studied. Concentrations of thirteen PFASs and TSH were measured in plasma samples collected around the 18th week of gestation. Linear regression models were used to evaluate associations between PFASs and TSH.
Among the thirteen PFASs, seven were detected in more than 60% of samples and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) had the highest concentrations (median, 12.8 ng/mL; inter-quartile range [IQR], 10.1 -16.5 ng/mL). The median TSH concentration was 3.5 (IQR, 2.4 - 4.8) µIU/mL. Pregnant women with higher PFOS had higher TSH levels. After adjustment, with each 1 ng/mL increase in PFOS concentration, there was a 0.8% (95% confidence interval: 0.1%, 1.6%) rise in TSH. The odds ratio of having an abnormally high TSH, however, was not increased, and other PFASs were unrelated to TSH.
Our results suggest an association between PFOS and TSH in pregnant women that is small and may be of no clinical significance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24010716 View in PubMed
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Associations between brominated flame retardants in human milk and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) in neonates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134309
Source
Environ Res. 2011 Aug;111(6):737-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Merete Eggesbø
Cathrine Thomsen
Jens V Jørgensen
Georg Becher
Jon Øyvind Odland
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Department of Genes and Environment, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, PO Box 4404 Nydalen, N-0403 Oslo, Norway. merete.eggesbo@fhi.no
Source
Environ Res. 2011 Aug;111(6):737-43
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Flame Retardants - analysis
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure
Milk, human - chemistry
Norway - epidemiology
Thyrotropin - blood - drug effects
Abstract
Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been in widespread use in a vast array of consumer products since the 1970s. The metabolites of some BFRs show a structural similarity to thyroid hormones and experimental animal studies have confirmed that they may interfere with thyroid hormone homeostasis. A major concern has been whether intrauterine exposure to BFRs may disturb thyroid homeostasis since the fetal brain is particularly susceptible to alterations in thyroid hormones. However, few reports on newborns have been published to date.
To evaluate the association between BFRs and neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH).
We studied six polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) measured in milk samples from 239 women who were part of the "Norwegian Human Milk Study" (HUMIS), 2003-2006. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and BDE-209 were measured in a subset of the women (193 and 46 milk samples, respectively). The milk was sampled at a median of 33 days after delivery. TSH was measured in babies three days after delivery as part of the routine national screening program for early detection of congenital hypothyroidism. Additional information was obtained through the Medical Birth Registry and questionnaires to the mothers.
The PBDE concentrations in human milk in Norway were comparable to concentrations reported from other European countries and Asia, but not the US and Canada where levels are approximately one order of higher magnitude. We observed no statistically significant associations between BDE-47, 99, 153, 154, 209 and HBCD in human milk and TSH in models adjusted for possible confounders and other environmental toxicants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).
We did not observe an association between TSH and exposure to HBCD and PBDEs within the exposure levels observed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21601188 View in PubMed
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Brief Report: Plasma Concentrations of Perfluorooctane Sulfonamide and Time-to-pregnancy Among Primiparous Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286760
Source
Epidemiology. 2016 Sep;27(5):712-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Kristina W Whitworth
Line S Haug
Azemira Sabaredzovic
Merete Eggesbo
Matthew P Longnecker
Source
Epidemiology. 2016 Sep;27(5):712-5
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body mass index
Chromatography, Liquid
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Humans
Logistic Models
Mass Spectrometry
Maternal Age
Norway
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Sulfonamides - blood
Time-to-Pregnancy
Young Adult
Abstract
A previous study reported a negative association between perfluorooctane sulfonamide (PFOSA) concentrations and fecundability.
We examined this association among women enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), in 2003-2004. This analysis was restricted to 451 primiparous women to avoid bias due to previous pregnancy. Self-reported time-to-pregnancy (TTP) and plasma were obtained around 18 weeks of gestation. Approximately half of the women had measurable PFOSA levels; missing values were multiply imputed. We used the logistic analogue of discrete-time survival analysis to examine the adjusted association between PFOSA, other perfluoroalkyl substances, and TTP.
The median-measured PFOSA concentration was 0.03?ng/ml (interquartile range = 0.02, 0.07). The age and body mass index-adjusted association between an interquartile distance increase in PFOSA and TTP was 0.91 (95% confidence interval = 0.71, 1.17). Imputation of missing PFOSA resulted in similar estimates. No association was observed with other perfluoroalkyl substances.
Based on a weakly decreased fecundability odds ratio, we found only limited support for an association between plasma PFOSA concentrations and TTP among primiparous women. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/EDE/B79.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27276029 View in PubMed
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Comparison of polychlorinated biphenyl levels across studies of human neurodevelopment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49183
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):65-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Matthew P Longnecker
Mary S Wolff
Beth C Gladen
John W Brock
Philippe Grandjean
Joseph L Jacobson
Susan A Korrick
Walter J Rogan
Nynke Weisglas-Kuperus
Irva Hertz-Picciotto
Pierre Ayotte
Paul Stewart
Gerhard Winneke
M Judith Charles
Sandra W Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
E Rudy Boersma
Larisa M Altshul
Birger Heinzow
James J Pagano
Allan A Jensen
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. longnecker@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2003 Jan;111(1):65-70
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromatography, Gas - methods
Comparative Study
Environmental pollutants - blood
Europe
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Milk, Human - chemistry - drug effects
Nervous System - drug effects - embryology
Polychlorinated biphenyls - blood
Pregnancy
Quebec
Sensitivity and specificity
United States
Abstract
Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent pollutants that are ubiquitous in the food chain, and detectable amounts are in the blood of almost every person in most populations that have been examined. Extensive evidence from animal studies shows that PCBs are neurotoxins, even at low doses. Interpretation of human data regarding low-level, early-life PCB exposure and subsequent neurodevelopment is problematic because levels of exposure were not similarly quantified across studies. We expressed the exposure levels from 10 studies of PCB and neurodevelopment in a uniform manner using a combination of data from original investigators, laboratory reanalyses, calculations based on published data, and expert opinion. The mainstay of our comparison was the median level of PCB 153 in maternal pregnancy serum. The median concentration of PCB 153 in the 10 studies ranged from 30 to 450 ng/g serum lipid, and the median of the 10 medians was 110 ng/g. We found that (a)) the distribution of PCB 153 exposure in most studies overlapped substantially, (b)) exposure levels in the Faroe Islands study were about 3-4-fold higher than in most other studies, and (c)) the exposure levels in the two recent U.S. studies were about one-third of those in the four earlier U.S. studies or recent Dutch, German, and northern Qu?bec studies. Our results will facilitate a direct comparison of the findings on PCBs and neurodevelopment when they are published for all 10 studies.
PubMed ID
12515680 View in PubMed
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Estimating effect of environmental contaminants on women's subfecundity for the MoBa study data with an outcome-dependent sampling scheme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263239
Source
Biostatistics. 2014 Oct;15(4):636-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Jieli Ding
Haibo Zhou
Yanyan Liu
Jianwen Cai
Matthew P Longnecker
Source
Biostatistics. 2014 Oct;15(4):636-50
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caprylates - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Female
Fertility - drug effects
Fluorocarbons - adverse effects
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Abstract
Motivated by the need from our on-going environmental study in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa) study, we consider an outcome-dependent sampling (ODS) scheme for failure-time data with censoring. Like the case-cohort design, the ODS design enriches the observed sample by selectively including certain failure subjects. We present an estimated maximum semiparametric empirical likelihood estimation (EMSELE) under the proportional hazards model framework. The asymptotic properties of the proposed estimator were derived. Simulation studies were conducted to evaluate the small-sample performance of our proposed method. Our analyses show that the proposed estimator and design is more efficient than the current default approach and other competing approaches. Applying the proposed approach with the data set from the MoBa study, we found a significant effect of an environmental contaminant on fecundability.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24812419 View in PubMed
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Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero and subsequent plasma lipids, ApoB, and CRP among adult women in the MoBa cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122454
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Nov;120(11):1532-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Lea A Cupul-Uicab
Rolv Skjaerven
Kjell Haug
Gregory S Travlos
Ralph E Wilson
Merete Eggesbø
Jane A Hoppin
Kristina W Whitworth
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. cupuluicabl@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Nov;120(11):1532-7
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Lipids - blood
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - blood - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent findings suggest that maternal smoking during pregnancy may play a role in the development of metabolic alterations in offspring during childhood. However, whether such exposure increases the risk of developing similar metabolic alterations during adulthood is uncertain.
We evaluated the association of in utero exposure to maternal tobacco smoke with plasma lipids, apolipoprotein B (apoB), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in adulthood.
The study was based on a subsample of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and included 479 pregnant women with plasma lipids, apoB, and CRP measurements. Information on in utero exposure to tobacco smoke, personal smoking, and other factors were obtained from the women by a self-completed questionnaire at enrollment, at approximately 17 weeks of gestation.
Women exposed to tobacco smoke in utero had higher triglycerides [10.7% higher; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.9, 17.9] and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) (-1.9 mg/dL; 95% CI: -4.3, 0.5) compared with unexposed women, after adjusting for age, physical activity, education, personal smoking, and current body mass index (BMI). Exposed women were also more likely to have triglycerides = 200 mg/dL [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 2.5; 95% CI: 1.3, 5.1] and HDL
Notes
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PubMed ID
22814200 View in PubMed
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In utero exposure to maternal tobacco smoke and subsequent obesity, hypertension, and gestational diabetes among women in the MoBa cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129229
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Mar;120(3):355-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Lea A Cupul-Uicab
Rolv Skjaerven
Kjell Haug
Kari K Melve
Stephanie M Engel
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA. cupuluicabl@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Mar;120(3):355-60
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - chemically induced - epidemiology
Diabetes, Gestational - chemically induced - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - chemically induced - epidemiology
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced - chemically induced - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity - chemically induced - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology
Prevalence
Self Report
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Young Adult
Abstract
Environmental factors influencing the developmental origins of health and disease need to be identified and investigated. In utero exposure to tobacco smoke has been associated with obesity and a small increase in blood pressure in children; however, whether there is a corresponding increased risk of conditions such as diabetes and hypertension during adulthood remains unclear.
Our goal was to assess the association of self-reported in utero exposure to tobacco smoke with the prevalence of obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in women 14-47 years of age.
We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, which enrolled pregnant women in Norway from 1999 thorough 2008. Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero (yes vs. no) was ascertained on the baseline questionnaire (obtained at ~ 17 weeks' gestation); the outcomes were ascertained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and the questionnaire. Our analysis included 74,023 women.
Women exposed to tobacco smoke in utero had 1.53 times the odds of obesity [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.45, 1.61] relative to those unexposed, after adjusting for age, education, and personal smoking. After further adjustment for body mass index, the odds ratio for hypertension was 1.68 (95% CI: 1.19, 2.39); for T2DM 1.14 (95% CI: 0.79, 1.65); and for GDM 1.32 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.58) among exposed compared with unexposed.
Exposure to tobacco smoke in utero was associated with obesity, hypertension, and GDM in adult women. The possibility that the associations were attributable to unmeasured confounding cannot be excluded.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22128036 View in PubMed
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In utero exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and sensorineural hearing loss in 8-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30181
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2004 Sep-Oct;26(5):629-37
Publication Type
Article
Author
Matthew P Longnecker
Howard J Hoffman
Mark A Klebanoff
John W Brock
Haibo Zhou
Larry Needham
Tilahun Adera
Xuguang Guo
Kimberly A Gray
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 12233, MD A3-05, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA. longnecker@niehs.nih.gov
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2004 Sep-Oct;26(5):629-37
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Audiometry - methods
Birth Weight - drug effects
Body Height - drug effects
Child
Comparative Study
Environmental Pollutants - blood - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hearing Loss, Sensorineural - chemically induced
Humans
Male
Maternal Exposure
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - blood - poisoning
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Early-life exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, increases the hearing threshold at selected frequencies in rats. Among humans from the Faroe Islands with unusually high early-life PCB exposure, exposure was directly associated with increased hearing thresholds at two frequencies, although the deficits were present in the left ear but not the right. We examined PCB levels in maternal pregnancy serum in relation with audiometrically determined hearing thresholds among offspring when they were of school age. Complete data were available for 195 children with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and 615 children selected at random, all of whom were born in 1959-1966 in the Collaborative Perinatal Project (CPP) U.S. cohort. The median exposure among those selected at random, as reflected by the mother's third trimester serum total PCB concentration, was 2.8 microg/l, about twofold higher than recent background levels in the United States. Based on the average hearing threshold across the frequencies essential for speech recognition in the "worst ear," the maternal serum PCB level was unrelated to the adjusted odds of SNHL or to adjusted mean hearing threshold. Overall, an adverse effect of early-life, background-level PCB exposure on SNHL was not supported by these data.
PubMed ID
15315812 View in PubMed
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In utero exposure to tobacco smoke and subsequent reduced fertility in females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141032
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 Nov;25(11):2901-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Xibiao Ye
Rolv Skjaerven
Olga Basso
Donna D Baird
Merete Eggesbo
Lea Aurora Cupul Uicab
Kjell Haug
Matthew P Longnecker
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Department of Human and Health Services, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709, USA.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2010 Nov;25(11):2901-6
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Fertility - drug effects
Humans
Infertility, Female - etiology
Norway
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
Animal studies have shown that in utero exposure to chemicals in tobacco smoke reduces female fertility, but epidemiological findings have been inconsistent.
We examined the association between in utero exposure to tobacco smoke and female fertility among women in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, enrolled from 1999 to 2007. Around the 17th week of pregnancy, participants reported how long they took to conceive (time to pregnancy), and whether their mother smoked while pregnant with the participant. This analysis included 48 319 planned pregnancies among women aged 15-44 years. We estimated fecundability odds ratios (FORs) using a discrete-time survival analysis, adjusting for age, education and adult tobacco smoking.
The adjusted FOR for in utero exposure to tobacco smoke among all subjects was 0.96 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 0.98], among subjects reporting no adult tobacco smoking or passive exposure it was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.93, 0.99) and among subjects reporting adult tobacco smoking or passive exposure it was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.99). We performed a probabilistic sensitivity analysis to estimate the effect of exposure and outcome misclassification on the results, and, as expected, the association became more pronounced after taking misclassification into account.
This large cohort study supports a small-to-modest association between in utero exposure to tobacco smoke and reduced fertility.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20817739 View in PubMed
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Maternal glomerular filtration rate in pregnancy and fetal size.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261338
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(7):e101897
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Nils-Halvdan Morken
Gregory S Travlos
Ralph E Wilson
Merete Eggesbø
Matthew P Longnecker
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(7):e101897
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - blood
Female
Fetal Weight
Gestational Age
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway
Pre-Eclampsia - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Young Adult
Abstract
The relationship of maternal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in pregnancy to fetal size needs to be better characterized as it impacts an ongoing debate about confounding effect of maternal GFR in investigations of important environmental contaminants. We aimed to characterize the size of the association between maternal GFR and infant birth weight.
A sub-cohort of 953 selected women (470 women with and 483 women without preeclampsia) in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort (MoBa), recruited during 2003-2007 were analyzed. GFR in the second trimester was estimated based on plasma creatinine. Birth weight was ascertained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Multivariate linear regression was used to evaluate the association between maternal GFR in second trimester (estimated by the Cockroft-Gault [GFR-CG] and the modification of diet in renal disease [GFR-MDRD] formulas) and infant birth weight. Partial correlation coefficients were also calculated.
Maternal GFR-CG (ß: 0.73 g/ml/min, p?=?0.04) and GFR-MDRD (ß: 0.83 g/ml/min, p?=?0.04) were associated with infant birth weight in models adjusted for maternal weight in kilograms, preeclampsia, and gestational age at delivery (days). Partial correlation coefficients for the association between infant birth weight and GFR were 0.07 for both formulas. Although the birth weight-GFR association was stronger among the women with preeclampsia, the difference from women without preeclampsia was not statistically significant.
These data support an association between GFR during pregnancy and infant birth weight, and indicate that GFR may confound selected epidemiologic associations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25003331 View in PubMed
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