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Integrating preventive dental care into general Paediatric practice for Indigenous communities: paediatric residents' perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309659
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1573162
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2019
Author
Mohamed ElSalhy
Mandeep Gill
Daniela Migliarese Isaac
Randy Littlechild
Lola Baydala
Maryam Amin
Author Affiliation
a College of Dental Medicine , University of New England , Portland , ME , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2019 12; 78(1):1573162
Date
12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Dental Care - organization & administration - standards
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Internship and Residency
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Pediatrics - education
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Qualitative Research
Systems Integration
Young Adult
Abstract
This qualitative study aimed to explore paediatric residents' perceptions of the feasibility of incorporating preventive dental care into a general paediatric outreach clinic for a First Nations community. Four focus groups were conducted with paediatric residents and attending paediatricians. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a basic interpretive qualitative approach. Three major themes emerged from the data: advantages of integration, barriers to integration and strategies for integration. Comprehensive care and service delivery were the two identified advantages of integration. Three categories of barriers emerged including patient and caregiver-related, resident-related and setting-related barriers. Training and practice, patient education, support and policy were the suggested strategies for successful integration. Providers were found to be open to integrating preventive dental care into their practice. However, barriers impeded the success of this integration. Multiple strategies including oral health care training for medical providers, office support and policy changes would facilitate successful integration.
PubMed ID
30696378 View in PubMed
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Is the wait-for-patient-to-come approach suitable for African newcomers to Alberta, Canada?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124786
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Dec;40(6):523-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Maryam Amin
Arnaldo Perez
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. maryam.amin@ualberta.ca
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2012 Dec;40(6):523-31
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Africa - ethnology
Alberta
Child, Preschool
Dental Care for Children - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Preventive Dentistry - statistics & numerical data
Psychology
Abstract
A qualitative study was conducted to identify psychosocial barriers to providing and obtaining preventive dental care for preschool children among African recent immigrants.
Seven focus groups were conducted with 48 mothers of 3- to 5-year-old children from Ethiopian, Eritrean, and Somali communities in Edmonton. Participants had lived in Canada for 5 years or less. Three debriefing interviews were conducted with the community health workers who facilitated the focus groups in participants' first languages. Data analysis consisted of assigning codes, grouping codes into existing or new categories of barriers, grouping identified categories into domains, and organizing categories and domains around a general perspective of psychosocial barriers to prevention of caries.
Barriers to prevention of early childhood caries (ECC) were associated with home-based prevention, early detection, and access to professional care. Barriers to parental prevention were related to health beliefs, knowledge, oral health approach, and skills. Barriers to early detection included perceived role of caregivers and dentists, perceived identity of ECC, ways of detecting cavities, and parental self-efficacy. Access barriers were related to parental knowledge of preventive services, attitudes toward dentists and dental services, English skills, and external constraints concerned dental insurance, social support, time, and transportation.
Preventive interventions should be aimed at assisting primary caregivers with providing and obtaining adequate dental care for their children through enhancing oral health literacy, developing new set of oral health-related skills, reducing environmental constraints, and strengthening their intention of obtaining professional preventive dental services.
PubMed ID
22548343 View in PubMed
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Nurturing social responsibility through community service-learning: Lessons learned from a pilot project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139660
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(11):905-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Shafik Dharamsi
Nancy Espinoza
Carl Cramer
Maryam Amin
Lesley Bainbridge
Gary Poole
Author Affiliation
The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada. shafik.dharamsi@familymed.ubc.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2010;32(11):905-11
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Education, Dental
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Pilot Projects
Preceptorship
Questionnaires
Social Responsibility
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Community service-learning (CSL) has been proposed as one way to enrich medical and dental students' sense of social responsibility toward people who are marginalized in society.
We developed and implemented a new CSL option in the integrated medical/dental curriculum and assessed its educational impact.
Focus groups, individual open-ended interviews, and a survey were used to assess dental students', faculty tutors' and community partners' experiences with CSL.
CSL enabled a deeper appreciation for the vulnerabilities that people who are marginalized experience; students gained a greater insight into the social determinants of health and the related importance of community engagement; and they developed useful skills in health promotion project planning, implementation and evaluation. Community partners and faculty tutors indicated that equal partnership, greater collaboration, and a participatory approach to course development are essential to sustainability in CSL.
CSL can play an important role in nurturing a purposeful sense of social responsibility among future practitioners. Our study enabled the implementation of an innovative longitudinal course (professionalism and community service) in all 4 years of the dental curriculum.
PubMed ID
21039101 View in PubMed
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Women in orthodontics and work-family balance: challenges and strategies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122817
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2012;78:c61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Sarah Davidson
Paul W Major
Carlos Flores-Mir
Maryam Amin
Louanne Keenan
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2012;78:c61
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Canada
Conflict (Psychology)
Dentists, Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Job Satisfaction
Mentors
Middle Aged
Mothers - psychology
Orthodontics - manpower
Questionnaires
Work - psychology
Workload
Abstract
The number of women entering the orthodontic profession over the past few decades has increased dramatically. A review of the literature revealed the lack of research on achieving a work-family balance among female dentists and dental specialists. Work-family balance has been researched more extensively in the field of medicine; however, despite some critical differences, parallels between these 2 professions exist. This study identified issues that Canadian female orthodontists face and strategies they use to achieve a work-family balance. A phenomenological qualitative study was used to analyze the results of semi-structured telephone interviews of a purposive sample of 13 Canadian female orthodontists. The results strongly support the role-conflict theory about the competing pressures of maternal and professional roles. Female orthodontists described their challenges and strategies to minimize role conflict in their attempt to achieve a work-family balance. The women defined balance as having success and satisfaction in both their family life and professional life. They identified specific challenges of achieving a work-family balance that are unique to orthodontic practice and strategies for adapting to their maternal and professional roles. Achieving a work-family balance is of paramount importance to female orthodontists, and the results of this study may be applied to other specialties in dentistry.
PubMed ID
22770247 View in PubMed
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