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The 2012 Canadian hypertension education program recommendations for the management of hypertension: blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, and therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124290
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert R Quinn
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Daniel G Hackam
Simon W Rabkin
Doreen M Rabi
Richard E Gilbert
Raj S Padwal
Martin Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Tavis S Campbell
Lyne Cloutier
Steven Grover
George Honos
Robert J Herman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas Wilson
Ross D Feldman
M Patrice Lindsay
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Simon L Bacon
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Maxime Lamarre-Cliché
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Norman R C Campbell
Debra Reid
Luc Poirier
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, McGill University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. stella.daskalopoulou@mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2012 May;28(3):270-87
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination - methods
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine - standards
Female
Health Education - standards
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2012. The new recommendations are: (1) use of home blood pressure monitoring to confirm a diagnosis of white coat syndrome; (2) mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may be used in selected patients with hypertension and systolic heart failure; (3) a history of atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension should not be a factor in deciding to prescribe an angiotensin-receptor blocker for the treatment of hypertension; and (4) the blood pressure target for patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease has now been changed to
PubMed ID
22595447 View in PubMed
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The 2013 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115112
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Daniel G Hackam
Robert R Quinn
Pietro Ravani
Doreen M Rabi
Kaberi Dasgupta
Stella S Daskalopoulou
Nadia A Khan
Robert J Herman
Simon L Bacon
Lyne Cloutier
Martin Dawes
Simon W Rabkin
Richard E Gilbert
Marcel Ruzicka
Donald W McKay
Tavis S Campbell
Steven Grover
George Honos
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Peter Bolli
Thomas W Wilson
Ross D Feldman
Patrice Lindsay
Michael D Hill
Mark Gelfer
Kevin D Burns
Michel Vallée
G V Ramesh Prasad
Marcel Lebel
Donna McLean
J Malcolm O Arnold
Gordon W Moe
Jonathan G Howlett
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Pierre Larochelle
Lawrence A Leiter
Charlotte Jones
Richard I Ogilvie
Vincent Woo
Janusz Kaczorowski
Luc Trudeau
Robert J Petrella
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Denis Drouin
Kim L Lavoie
Maxime Lamarre-Cliche
Marshall Godwin
Guy Tremblay
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
S George Carruthers
George B Pylypchuk
Ellen Burgess
Richard Lewanczuk
George K Dresser
S Brian Penner
Robert A Hegele
Philip A McFarlane
Mukul Sharma
Debra J Reid
Sheldon W Tobe
Luc Poirier
Raj S Padwal
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Department of Medicine, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada. dhackam@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 May;29(5):528-42
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Exercise - physiology
Health education
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy
Risk assessment
Abstract
We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2013. This year's update includes 2 new recommendations. First, among nonhypertensive or stage 1 hypertensive individuals, the use of resistance or weight training exercise does not adversely influence blood pressure (BP) (Grade D). Thus, such patients need not avoid this type of exercise for fear of increasing BP. Second, and separately, for very elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension (age 80 years or older), the target for systolic BP should be
PubMed ID
23541660 View in PubMed
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Actionable nuggets: knowledge translation tool for the needs of patients with spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269783
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Mary Ann McColl
Alice Aiken
Karen Smith
Alexander McColl
Michael Green
Marshall Godwin
Richard Birtwhistle
Kathleen Norman
Gabrielle Brankston
Michael Schaub
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Family Practice - education
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care
Spinal Cord Injuries
Translational Medical Research - methods
Abstract
To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice.
Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets' effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility.
Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia.
Forty-nine primary care physicians.
Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants' opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews.
With Actionable Nuggets, participants' knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians' practices was 72%. Participants' awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent.
Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian Medical Association to approximately 50,000 primary care physicians in Canada, in both English and French.
Notes
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Cites: Aust Fam Physician. 2008 Apr;37(4):229-3318398518
PubMed ID
26167564 View in PubMed
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Ambulatory teaching: do approaches to learning predict the site and preceptor characteristics valued by clerks and residents in the ambulatory setting?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172409
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2005;5:35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
M Dianne Delva
Karen W Schultz
John R Kirby
Marshall Godwin
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. mdd2@post.queensu.ca
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2005;5:35
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Clerkship - organization & administration - standards
Consumer Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Decision Making
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration - standards
Learning
Ontario
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
In a study to determine the site and preceptor characteristics most valued by clerks and residents in the ambulatory setting we wished to confirm whether these would support effective learning. The deep approach to learning is thought to be more effective for learning than surface approaches. In this study we determined how the approaches to learning of clerks and residents predicted the valued site and preceptor characteristics in the ambulatory setting.
Postal survey of all medical residents and clerks in training in Ontario determining the site and preceptor characteristics most valued in the ambulatory setting. Participants also completed the Workplace Learning questionnaire that includes 3 approaches to learning scales and 3 workplace climate scales. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict the preferred site and preceptor characteristics as the dependent variables by the average scores of the approaches to learning and perception of workplace climate scales as the independent variables.
There were 1642 respondents, yielding a 47.3% response rate. Factor analysis revealed 7 preceptor characteristics and 6 site characteristics valued in the ambulatory setting. The Deep approach to learning scale predicted all of the learners' preferred preceptor characteristics (beta = 0.076 to beta = 0.234, p
Notes
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Cites: BMJ. 1999 Aug 28;319(7209):542-610463892
Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2004 Aug 6;4:1215298710
PubMed ID
16225666 View in PubMed
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An investigation of cancer rates in the Argentia region, Newfoundland and Labrador: an ecological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274996
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2015;2015:421562
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Pauline Duke
Marshall Godwin
Mandy Peach
Jacqueline Fortier
Stephen Bornstein
Sharon Buehler
Farah McCrate
Andrea Pike
Peizhong Peter Wang
Richard M Cullen
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2015;2015:421562
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Environmental Pollutants - analysis
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Newfoundland and Labrador - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The Argentia region of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, was home to a US naval base during a 40-year period between the 1940s and the 1990s. Activities on the base resulted in contamination of the soil and groundwater in the region with chemicals such as heavy metals and dioxins, and residents have expressed concern about higher rates of cancer in their community. This study investigated the rate of cancer diagnosis that is disproportionately high in the Argentia region.
Cases of cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 2011 were obtained for the Argentia region, two comparison communities, and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Crude and age-standardized incidence rates of cancer diagnosis were calculated and compared. The crude incidence rate was adjusted for differences in age demographics using census data, and age-standardized incidence rates were compared.
Although the Argentia region had a higher crude rate of cancer diagnosis, the age-standardized incidence rate did not differ significantly from the comparison communities or the provincial average. Argentia has an aging population, which may have influenced the perception of increased cancer diagnosis in the community.
We did not detect an increased burden of cancer in the Argentia region.
Notes
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Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jul;104(7):1204-824832152
Cites: J Pediatr. 2014 Dec;165(6):1216-2125241182
PubMed ID
26633979 View in PubMed
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Assessing the relationship of learning approaches to workplace climate in clerkship and residency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177759
Source
Acad Med. 2004 Nov;79(11):1120-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
M Dianne Delva
John Kirby
Karen Schultz
Marshall Godwin
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, 220 Bagot Street, Kingston, Ontario K7L 5E9, Canada. mdd2@post.queensu.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2004 Nov;79(11):1120-6
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Clerkship
Data Collection
Demography
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Learning
Male
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Workload
Workplace
Abstract
To determine what approaches to learning are adopted by clinical clerks and residents and whether these approaches are associated with demographic factors, specialty, level of training, and perceptions of the workplace climate.
In 2001-02, medical clerks (n = 532) and residents (n = 2,939) at five medical schools in Ontario, Canada, were mailed the Workplace Learning Questionnaire. The correlation between the approaches to learning at work and perceived workplace climate and the influence of gender, age, location, residency program and level of training on outcomes were measured.
A total of 1,642 clerks and residents responded (47%). The factor structure and reliability of the Workplace Learning Questionnaire were confirmed for these respondents. A surface-disorganized approach to learning was correlated with perception of heavy workload (r = .401, p
PubMed ID
15504785 View in PubMed
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Attainment of Canadian Diabetes Association recommended targets in patients with type 2 diabetes: a study of primary care practices in St John's, Nfld.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145958
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Jan;56(1):e13-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Farah McCrate
Marshall Godwin
Laura Murphy
Author Affiliation
Office for Aging and Seniors, Department of Health and Community Services, Newfoundland and Laborador, St. John's.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2010 Jan;56(1):e13-9
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Determination
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Clinical Competence - standards
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - therapy
Family Practice
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Humans
Medical Audit - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Physician's Practice Patterns
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Reference Standards
Regression Analysis
Abstract
To examine the degree to which targets for diabetes (blood pressure [BP], glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c], and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]) are achieved in family practices and how these results compare with family physicians' perceptions of how well targets are being achieved.
Chart audit and physician survey.
Newfoundland and Labrador.
Patients with type 2 diabetes and their family physicians.
The charts of 20 patients with type 2 diabetes were randomly chosen from each of 8 family physician practices in St John's, Nfld, and data were abstracted. All family physicians in the province were surveyed using a modified Dillman method.
The most recent HbA1c, LDL-C, and BP measurements listed in each audited chart; surveyed family physicians' knowledge of the recommended targets for HbA1c, LDL-C, and BP and their estimates of what percentage of their patients were at those recommended targets.
The chart audit revealed that 20.6% of patients were at the recommended target for BP, 48.1% were at the recommended target for HbA1c, and 17.5% were at the recommended target for LDL-C. When targets were examined collectively, only 2.5% of patients were achieving targets in all 3 areas. The survey found that most family physicians were aware of the recommended targets for BP, LDL-C, and HbA1c. However, their estimates of the percentages of patients in their practices achieving these targets appeared high (59.3% for BP, 58.2% for HbA1c, and 48.4% for LDL-C) compared with the results of the chart audit.
The findings of the chart audit are consistent with other published reports, which have illustrated that a large majority of patients with diabetes fall short of reaching recommended targets for BP, blood glucose, and lipid levels. Although family physicians are knowledgeable about recommended targets, there is a gap between knowledge and clinical outcomes. The reasons for this are likely multifactorial. Further investigation is needed to better understand this phenomenon as well as to understand the foundation for physicians' optimistic estimates of how many of their patients with diabetes were reaching target values.
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2003 Jun;49:778-8512836867
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Cites: Mil Med. 2005 Mar;170(3):243-615828703
PubMed ID
20090056 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding among the Ontario James Bay Cree: a retrospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157387
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):98-101
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ray Black
Marshall Godwin
David Ponka
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Mar-Apr;99(2):98-101
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Ontario
Pregnancy
Public Health
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Although previous unpublished research has demonstrated low breastfeeding rates among the James Bay Cree of Northern Ontario, the reasons for this are not immediately clear.
A retrospective medical chart review of women who had given birth at the Weeneebayko General Hospital in Moose Factory, Ontario in the seven-year period 1997 to 2003 was performed. A variety of demographic variables were documented and overall breastfeeding initiation rates and yearly variations were assessed.
Univariate chi-square analysis of the data indicated that young maternal age (mean=23; p=0.001), maternal smoking (average rate=52.1%; p=0.03), living location (in a small coastal community; p=0.001); and low education status (not completing high school; p
PubMed ID
18457281 View in PubMed
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Building a pan-Canadian primary care sentinel surveillance network: initial development and moving forward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149799
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;22(4):412-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Richard Birtwhistle
Karim Keshavjee
Anita Lambert-Lanning
Marshall Godwin
Michelle Greiver
Donna Manca
Claudia Lagacé
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario Canada K7L 5N6. birtwhis@queensu.ca
Source
J Am Board Fam Med. 2009 Jul-Aug;22(4):412-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Computer Communication Networks - organization & administration
Cooperative Behavior
Databases as Topic
Family Practice
Feasibility Studies
Humans
Population Surveillance - methods
Primary Health Care
Program Development
Abstract
The development of a pan-Canadian network of primary care research networks for studying issues in primary care has been the vision of Canadian primary care researchers for many years. With the opportunity for funding from the Public Health Agency of Canada and the support of the College of Family Physicians of Canada, we have planned and developed a project to assess the feasibility of a network of networks of family medicine practices that exclusively use electronic medical records. The Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network will collect longitudinal data from practices across Canada to assess the primary care epidemiology and management of 5 chronic diseases: hypertension, diabetes, depression, chronic obstructive lung disease, and osteoarthritis. This article reports on the 7-month first phase of the feasibility project of 7 regional networks in Canada to develop a business plan, including governance, mission, and vision; develop memorandum of agreements with the regional networks and their respective universities; develop and obtain approval of research ethics board applications; develop methods for data extraction, a Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network database, and initial assessment of the types of data that can be extracted; and recruitment of 10 practices at each network that use electronic medical records. The project will continue in phase 2 of the feasibility testing until April 2010.
PubMed ID
19587256 View in PubMed
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Centre for Studies in Primary Care: offering a laboratory of primary care practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175545
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Mar;51:393
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Marshall Godwin
Rachelle Seguin
Craig Jones
Debbie Jones
Author Affiliation
Centre for Studies in Primary Care, Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2005 Mar;51:393
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Primary Health Care
PubMed ID
15794024 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.