Skip header and navigation

Refine By

104 records – page 1 of 11.

A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people (FINGER): a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264224
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-2015
Author
Tiia Ngandu
Jenni Lehtisalo
Alina Solomon
Esko Levälahti
Satu Ahtiluoto
Riitta Antikainen
Lars Bäckman
Tuomo Hänninen
Antti Jula
Tiina Laatikainen
Jaana Lindström
Francesca Mangialasche
Teemu Paajanen
Satu Pajala
Markku Peltonen
Rainer Rauramaa
Anna Stigsdotter-Neely
Timo Strandberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Hilkka Soininen
Miia Kivipelto
Source
Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2255-63
Date
Jun-6-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Double-Blind Method
Exercise
Exercise Therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Risk assessment
Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Modifiable vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors have been associated with dementia risk in observational studies. In the Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER), a proof-of-concept randomised controlled trial, we aimed to assess a multidomain approach to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
In a double-blind randomised controlled trial we enrolled individuals aged 60-77 years recruited from previous national surveys. Inclusion criteria were CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia) Dementia Risk Score of at least 6 points and cognition at mean level or slightly lower than expected for age. We randomly assigned participants in a 1:1 ratio to a 2 year multidomain intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring), or a control group (general health advice). Computer-generated allocation was done in blocks of four (two individuals randomly allocated to each group) at each site. Group allocation was not actively disclosed to participants and outcome assessors were masked to group allocation. The primary outcome was change in cognition as measured through comprehensive neuropsychological test battery (NTB) Z score. Analysis was by modified intention to treat (all participants with at least one post-baseline observation). This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01041989.
Between Sept 7, 2009, and Nov 24, 2011, we screened 2654 individuals and randomly assigned 1260 to the intervention group (n=631) or control group (n=629). 591 (94%) participants in the intervention group and 599 (95%) in the control group had at least one post-baseline assessment and were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis. Estimated mean change in NTB total Z score at 2 years was 0·20 (SE 0·02, SD 0·51) in the intervention group and 0·16 (0·01, 0·51) in the control group. Between-group difference in the change of NTB total score per year was 0·022 (95% CI 0·002-0·042, p=0·030). 153 (12%) individuals dropped out overall. Adverse events occurred in 46 (7%) participants in the intervention group compared with six (1%) participants in the control group; the most common adverse event was musculoskeletal pain (32 [5%] individuals for intervention vs no individuals for control).
Findings from this large, long-term, randomised controlled trial suggest that a multidomain intervention could improve or maintain cognitive functioning in at-risk elderly people from the general population.
Academy of Finland, La Carita Foundation, Alzheimer Association, Alzheimer's Research and Prevention Foundation, Juho Vainio Foundation, Novo Nordisk Foundation, Finnish Social Insurance Institution, Ministry of Education and Culture, Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation, Axa Research Fund, EVO funding for University Hospitals of Kuopio, Oulu, and Turku and for Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Oulu City Hospital, Swedish Research Council, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, and af Jochnick Foundation.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Neurol. 2015 May;11(5):24825799934
PubMed ID
25771249 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption and alcohol problems after bariatric surgery in the Swedish obese subjects study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115320
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Dec;21(12):2444-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Per-Arne Svensson
Åsa Anveden
Stefano Romeo
Markku Peltonen
Sofie Ahlin
Maria Antonella Burza
Björn Carlsson
Peter Jacobson
Anna-Karin Lindroos
Hans Lönroth
Cristina Maglio
Ingmar Näslund
Kajsa Sjöholm
Hans Wedel
Bo Söderpalm
Lars Sjöström
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Dec;21(12):2444-51
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gastric Bypass
Gastroplasty
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - surgery
Postoperative Care
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Increased sensitivity to alcohol after gastric bypass has been described. The aim of this study was to investigate whether bariatric surgery is associated with alcohol problems.
The prospective, controlled Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study enrolled 2,010 obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery (68% vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG), 19% banding, and 13% gastric bypass) and 2,037 matched controls. Patients were recruited between 1987 and 2001. Data on alcohol abuse diagnoses, self-reported alcohol consumption, and alcohol problems were obtained from the National Patient Register and questionnaires. Follow-up time was 8-22 years.
During follow-up, 93.1% of the surgery patients and 96.0% of the controls reported alcohol consumption classified as low risk by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, compared to controls, the gastric bypass group had increased risk of alcohol abuse diagnoses (adjusted hazard ratio [adjHR] = 4.97), alcohol consumption at least at the WHO medium risk level (adjHR = 2.69), and alcohol problems (adjHR = 5.91). VBG increased the risk of these conditions with adjHRs of 2.23, 1.52, and 2.30, respectively, while banding was not different from controls.
Alcohol consumption, alcohol problems, and alcohol abuse are increased after gastric bypass and VBG.
PubMed ID
23520203 View in PubMed
Less detail

All-cause and disease-specific mortality among male, former elite athletes: an average 50-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271045
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2015 Jul;49(13):893-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Jyrki A Kettunen
Urho M Kujala
Jaakko Kaprio
Heli Bäckmand
Markku Peltonen
Johan G Eriksson
Seppo Sarna
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2015 Jul;49(13):893-7
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Dementia - mortality
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Sports - statistics & numerical data
Stroke - mortality
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate life expectancy and mortality among former elite athletes and controls.
HR analysis of cause-specific deaths sourced from the national death registry for former Finnish male endurance, team and power sports athletes (N=2363) and controls (N=1657). The median follow-up time was 50 years.
Median life expectancy was higher in the endurance (79.1 years, 95% CI 76.6 to 80.6) and team (78.8, 78.1 to 79.8) sports athletes than in controls (72.9, 71.8 to 74.3). Compared to controls, risk for total mortality adjusted for socioeconomic status and birth cohort was lower in the endurance ((HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.61 to 0.79)) and team (0.80, 0.72 to 0.89) sports athletes, and slightly lower in the power sports athletes (0.93, 0.85 to 1.03). HR for ischaemic heart disease mortality was lower in the endurance (0.68, 0.54 to 0.86) and team sports (0.73, 0.60 to 0.89) athletes. HR for stroke mortality was 0.52 (0.33 to 0.83) in the endurance and 0.59 (0.40 to 0.88) in the team sports athletes. Compared to controls, the risk for smoking-related cancer mortality was lower in the endurance (HR 0.20, 0.08 to 0.47) and power sports (0.40, 0.25 to 0.66) athletes. For dementia mortality, the power sports athletes, particularly boxers, had increased risk (HR 4.20, 2.30 to 7.81).
Elite athletes have 5-6 years additional life expectancy when compared to men who were healthy as young adults. Lower mortality for cardiovascular disease was in part due to lower rates of smoking, as tobacco-related cancer mortality was especially low.
PubMed ID
25183628 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of bariatric surgery with long-term remission of type 2 diabetes and with microvascular and macrovascular complications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104186
Source
JAMA. 2014 Jun 11;311(22):2297-304
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-11-2014
Author
Lars Sjöström
Markku Peltonen
Peter Jacobson
Sofie Ahlin
Johanna Andersson-Assarsson
Åsa Anveden
Claude Bouchard
Björn Carlsson
Kristjan Karason
Hans Lönroth
Ingmar Näslund
Elisabeth Sjöström
Magdalena Taube
Hans Wedel
Per-Arne Svensson
Kajsa Sjöholm
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
JAMA. 2014 Jun 11;311(22):2297-304
Date
Jun-11-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Blood glucose
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Complications - prevention & control
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - surgery
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Short-term studies show that bariatric surgery causes remission of diabetes. The long-term outcomes for remission and diabetes-related complications are not known.
To determine the long-term diabetes remission rates and the cumulative incidence of microvascular and macrovascular diabetes complications after bariatric surgery.
The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) is a prospective matched cohort study conducted at 25 surgical departments and 480 primary health care centers in Sweden. Of patients recruited between September 1, 1987, and January 31, 2001, 260 of 2037 control patients and 343 of 2010 surgery patients had type 2 diabetes at baseline. For the current analysis, diabetes status was determined at SOS health examinations until May 22, 2013. Information on diabetes complications was obtained from national health registers until December 31, 2012. Participation rates at the 2-, 10-, and 15-year examinations were 81%, 58%, and 41% in the control group and 90%, 76%, and 47% in the surgery group. For diabetes assessment, the median follow-up time was 10 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2-15) and 10 years (IQR, 10-15) in the control and surgery groups, respectively. For diabetes complications, the median follow-up time was 17.6 years (IQR, 14.2-19.8) and 18.1 years (IQR, 15.2-21.1) in the control and surgery groups, respectively.
Adjustable or nonadjustable banding (n = 61), vertical banded gastroplasty (n = 227), or gastric bypass (n = 55) procedures were performed in the surgery group, and usual obesity and diabetes care was provided to the control group.
Diabetes remission, relapse, and diabetes complications. Remission was defined as blood glucose
PubMed ID
24915261 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D with lifestyle factors and metabolic and cardiovascular disease markers: population-based cross-sectional study (FIN-D2D).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260969
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(7):e100235
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Maija E Miettinen
Leena Kinnunen
Jaana Leiviskä
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Eeva Korpi-Hyövälti
Leo Niskanen
Heikki Oksa
Timo Saaristo
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Mauno Vanhala
Matti Uusitupa
Markku Peltonen
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(7):e100235
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glucose - metabolism
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology - metabolism
Middle Aged
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) level has been associated with an increased risk of several chronic diseases. Our aim was to determine lifestyle and clinical factors that are associated with 25OHD level and to investigate connection of 25OHD level with metabolic and cardiovascular disease markers.
In total, 2868 Finnish men and women aged 45-74 years participated in FIN-D2D population-based health survey in 2007. Participants that had a serum sample available (98.4%; n?=?2822) were included in this study. 25OHD was measured with chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay method.
The mean 25OHD level was 58.2 nmol/l in men (n?=?1348) and 57.1 nmol/l in women (n?=?1474). Mean 25OHD level was lower in the younger age groups than in the older ones (p
Notes
Cites: Diabetologia. 2012 Aug;55(8):2173-8222526608
Cites: Eur Biophys J. 2009 Feb;38(2):145-5818797861
Cites: Br J Nutr. 2012 Nov 14;108(9):1557-6122264449
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2013 Jan;226(1):245-5123159013
Cites: PLoS Med. 2013;10(2):e100138323393431
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2013 Mar;52(2):513-2522538929
Cites: Pediatr Nephrol. 2013 Apr;28(4):605-1023239393
Cites: Clin Chem. 2013 May;59(5):771-8023503722
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2013 Jul;98(7):3001-923666975
Cites: Endocrinology. 2013 Sep;154(9):3022-3023825120
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2014;53(2):367-7424292820
Cites: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2014 Apr;80(4):502-723452164
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2014 Oct;144 Pt A:232-624189546
Cites: FASEB J. 2008 Dec;22(12):4044-5418716026
Cites: N Z Med J. 2007;120(1262):U273017891218
Cites: Osteoporos Int. 2009 Mar;20(3):417-2518629568
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2009 Mar;30(6):710-718676970
Cites: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2009 Jun;70(6):870-518771560
Cites: Circulation. 2009 Oct 20;120(16):1640-519805654
Cites: J Am Coll Nutr. 2009 Jun;28(3):252-620150598
Cites: J Nutr. 2010 May;140(5):987-9120237070
Cites: J Intern Med. 2010 May;267(5):462-7220141565
Cites: PLoS One. 2010;5(5):e1080120520739
Cites: Curr Opin Pharmacol. 2010 Aug;10(4):482-9620427238
Cites: Nutr Clin Pract. 2010 Aug;25(4):340-620702838
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2010 Sep;33(9):2021-320805275
Cites: Eur J Nutr. 2010 Oct;49(7):401-720204652
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2010 Oct;33(10):2146-5120664020
Cites: Joint Bone Spine. 2010 Dec;77(6):552-721067953
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2011 May;15(5):349-5421528160
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Sep;96(9):2851-6021715529
Cites: Prog Lipid Res. 2011 Oct;50(4):303-1221640757
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2011 Oct;96(10):2997-300621795448
Cites: Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2012 Jul;28(5):418-2322318870
Cites: Calcif Tissue Int. 1988 Oct;43(4):199-2013145124
Cites: Stroke. 2004 Oct;35(10):2248-5215345795
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 1999 Dec;53(12):920-610602348
Cites: J Immunol. 2000 Mar 1;164(5):2405-1110679076
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Sep;72(3):690-310966885
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 May;79(5):820-515113720
Cites: J Clin Invest. 1985 Oct;76(4):1536-82997282
Cites: Circulation. 1990 Aug;82(2):495-5062372896
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Jan;83(1):356-621984895
Cites: Diabetes. 2008 Feb;57(2):298-30518003755
Cites: Nutr J. 2008;7:418226257
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Jul 22;52(4):293-918634985
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Jul 19;372(9634):224-3318640459
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Aug;88(2):582S-586S18689406
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2008 Aug 11;168(15):1629-3718695076
Cites: Ann Epidemiol. 1992 Sep;2(5):697-7031342321
Cites: Eur J Endocrinol. 1997 Nov;137(5):495-5029405029
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2005 Sep;82(3):517-2216155262
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jul;84(1):18-2816825677
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Jan;85(1):6-1817209171
Cites: J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2007 Mar;103(3-5):786-9217215122
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 May;61(5):449-5417435214
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2007 Apr;66(2):101-1217515250
Cites: J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2007 Jun;92(6):2058-6517341569
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jul 19;357(3):266-8117634462
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;86(3):714-717823437
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2012 Dec 15;131(12):2754-6222961494
PubMed ID
25000408 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bariatric surgery and long-term cardiovascular events.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128246
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-4-2012
Author
Lars Sjöström
Markku Peltonen
Peter Jacobson
C David Sjöström
Kristjan Karason
Hans Wedel
Sofie Ahlin
Åsa Anveden
Calle Bengtsson
Gerd Bergmark
Claude Bouchard
Björn Carlsson
Sven Dahlgren
Jan Karlsson
Anna-Karin Lindroos
Hans Lönroth
Kristina Narbro
Ingmar Näslund
Torsten Olbers
Per-Arne Svensson
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. lars.v.sjostrom@medfak.gu.se
Source
JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65
Date
Jan-4-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Obesity - surgery
Prospective Studies
Stroke - mortality - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Weight loss might protect against cardiovascular events, but solid evidence is lacking.
To study the association between bariatric surgery, weight loss, and cardiovascular events.
The Swedish Obese Subjects (SOS) study is an ongoing, nonrandomized, prospective, controlled study conducted at 25 public surgical departments and 480 primary health care centers in Sweden of 2010 obese participants who underwent bariatric surgery and 2037 contemporaneously matched obese controls who received usual care. Patients were recruited between September 1, 1987, and January 31, 2001. Date of analysis was December 31, 2009, with median follow-up of 14.7 years (range, 0-20 years). Inclusion criteria were age 37 to 60 years and a body mass index of at least 34 in men and at least 38 in women. Exclusion criteria were identical in surgery and control patients. Surgery patients underwent gastric bypass (13.2%), banding (18.7%), or vertical banded gastroplasty (68.1%), and controls received usual care in the Swedish primary health care system. Physical and biochemical examinations and database cross-checks were undertaken at preplanned intervals.
The primary end point of the SOS study (total mortality) was published in 2007. Myocardial infarction and stroke were predefined secondary end points, considered separately and combined.
Bariatric surgery was associated with a reduced number of cardiovascular deaths (28 events among 2010 patients in the surgery group vs 49 events among 2037 patients in the control group; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; 95% CI, 0.29-0.76; P = .002). The number of total first time (fatal or nonfatal) cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction or stroke, whichever came first) was lower in the surgery group (199 events among 2010 patients) than in the control group (234 events among 2037 patients; adjusted HR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54-0.83; P
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2012 Mar;8(3):13022271190
Comment In: JAMA. 2012 Apr 18;307(15):1577; author reply 1577-822511678
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2012 Mar;9(3):12622271018
Comment In: Praxis (Bern 1994). 2012 May 9;101(10):673-522565560
Comment In: JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):88-922215170
PubMed ID
22215166 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bariatric Surgery and the Incidence of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis in the Swedish Obese Subjects Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290962
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2017 12; 25(12):2068-2073
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
12-2017
Author
Cristina Maglio
Markku Peltonen
Anna Rudin
Lena M S Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2017 12; 25(12):2068-2073
Date
12-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Arthritis, Psoriatic - etiology - pathology
Bariatric Surgery - adverse effects - methods
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Psoriasis - etiology - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the effect of bariatric surgery (vertical gastroplasty, gastric banding, or gastric bypass) compared with usual care on the incidence of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) in the Swedish Obese Subjects study.
This report includes 1,991 subjects who underwent bariatric surgery and 2,018 controls with obesity from the SOS study; none of them had psoriasis or PsA at baseline. Information about psoriasis and PsA diagnosis was retrieved through the Swedish National Patient Register and questionnaires.
During follow-up for up to 26 years, bariatric surgery was associated with a lower incidence of psoriasis compared with usual care (number of events?=?174; hazard ratio 0.65; 95% CI: 0.47-0.89; P?=?0.008). Both smoking and a longer duration of obesity were independently associated with a higher risk for psoriasis. No significant difference was detected among the three surgical procedures in terms of lowering the risk of developing psoriasis. The association between bariatric surgery and psoriasis incidence was not influenced by baseline confounders. No significant difference in the risk of developing PsA (number of events?=?46) was detected when comparing the surgery and the control groups.
This study shows that bariatric surgery is associated with a lower risk of developing psoriasis compared with usual care.
Notes
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 2016 Feb;31(2):125-36 PMID 26769609
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2011 Aug;63(8):1091-7 PMID 21560259
Cites: RMD Open. 2015 Jun 29;1(1):e000012 PMID 26509048
Cites: Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1992 Jun;16(6):465-79 PMID 1322873
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2017 Apr;44(4):437-443 PMID 28202737
Cites: Surg Obes Relat Dis. 2014 Nov-Dec;10(6):1155-9 PMID 25443045
Cites: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2011 Jul;65(1):198-200 PMID 20655127
Cites: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Sep;63(3):448-56 PMID 20605254
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2012 Aug;71(8):1273-7 PMID 22586165
Cites: Semin Immunopathol. 2016 Jan;38(1):11-27 PMID 26573299
Cites: Obes Surg. 2012 Jun;22(6):877-80 PMID 22488682
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Oct 15;61(10 ):1373-8 PMID 19790120
Cites: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Oct;63(4):571-9 PMID 20599293
Cites: J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2013 Oct;27(10):1293-8 PMID 23057623
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2015 Dec 3;97(6):816-36 PMID 26626624
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 Aug;19(8):1623-8 PMID 21311508
Cites: Dermatol Res Pract. 2013;2013:795932 PMID 24159327
Cites: JAMA. 2012 Jan 4;307(1):56-65 PMID 22215166
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Nov;88(5):1242-7 PMID 18996858
Cites: Acta Derm Venereol. 2009;89(5):492-7 PMID 19734975
Cites: PLoS Med. 2016 Aug 16;13(8):e1002081 PMID 27529652
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2014 Jun;73(6):1157-62 PMID 23771989
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jul 21;370(9583):263-71 PMID 17658397
Cites: JAMA Surg. 2017 Apr 1;152(4):344-349 PMID 28002543
Cites: Arthritis Care Res (Hoboken). 2013 Jan;65(1):141-7 PMID 22514189
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2012 Aug 23;367(8):695-704 PMID 22913680
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2013 Apr;36(4):865-72 PMID 23223352
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2016 Apr;76(4):688-693 PMID 28076240
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2005 Mar;64 Suppl 2:ii14-7 PMID 15708927
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2012 Mar;51(3):552-6 PMID 22120603
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2012 Dec;35(12):2613-7 PMID 22855732
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Aug 23;357(8):741-52 PMID 17715408
Cites: JAMA Dermatol. 2013 Jul;149(7):795-801 PMID 23752669
Cites: Am J Med. 2009 Mar;122(3):248-256.e5 PMID 19272486
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2012 Feb;71(2):219-24 PMID 21953342
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2012 Jun;71(6):804-8 PMID 22067198
Cites: J Cutan Med Surg. 2016 May;20(3):221-7 PMID 26553732
Cites: J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013 Nov;69(5):729-35 PMID 23981683
PubMed ID
29178583 View in PubMed
Less detail

Behavioral trait of morningness-eveningness in association with articular and spinal diseases in a population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268792
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(12):e114635
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ilona Merikanto
Tuuli Lahti
Seppo Seitsalo
Erkki Kronholm
Tiina Laatikainen
Markku Peltonen
Erkki Vartiainen
Timo Partonen
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(12):e114635
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Joint Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Spinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Earlier studies have revealed that the more the preference to schedule daily activities towards the evening hours is, the higher the odds for a range of health hazards are. Therefore, we wanted to analyze, whether the behavioral trait of morningness-eveningness is associated with articular and spinal diseases or those with musculoskeletal disorders. Participants (n?=?6089), as part of the National FINRISK 2007 Study, were derived from the general population, aged 25 to 74 years, living in Finland. Chronotype was assessed based on six items from the original Horne-Östberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire. Information about risk factors and the diagnoses of articular and spinal diseases were based on the self-reported information. Our results suggest that Evening-types have higher odds for articular and spinal diseases as compared with Morning-types, and this risk is heightened especially regarding spinal disease and backache (odds ratios of 1.8 to 2.1, and 1.6 to 1.8, respectively) and remains significant after controlling for the sex, age, education, civil status, physical activity, alcohol use, and smoking, and additionally for the body-mass index, insufficient sleep, or depressive symptoms.
Notes
Cites: Nat Rev Rheumatol. 2014 Sep;10(9):521-3024934191
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2012 Aug;29(7):920-722823875
Cites: Behav Neurosci. 2001 Aug;115(4):895-911508728
Cites: Int J Chronobiol. 1976;4(2):97-1101027738
Cites: Addiction. 1994 Apr;89(4):455-628025504
Cites: Am J Physiol. 1998 Nov;275(5 Pt 2):R1478-879791064
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 1999 Jan;16(1):79-9110023578
Cites: J Investig Med. 1999 Mar;47(3):141-5010198570
Cites: J Biol Rhythms. 2006 Feb;21(1):68-7616461986
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2006;23(1-2):497-50916687322
Cites: J Sleep Res. 2007 Jun;16(2):156-6217542945
Cites: Sleep Med Rev. 2008 Jun;12(3):211-2818486034
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2008 Sep-Oct;43(5):564-818644800
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2010 May;37(5):894-920360185
Cites: Sleep. 2012 Apr;35(4):537-4322467992
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2012 Apr;29(3):311-722390244
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2012 Jun;26(3):305-1922867928
Cites: Neurol Clin. 2012 Nov;30(4):1313-4323099140
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(1):e5404923335987
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2013 May;30(4):470-723281716
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2013 Jun;30(5):719-2523688117
Cites: J Pak Med Assoc. 2013 Jul;63(7):899-90623901717
Cites: Rheumatology (Oxford). 2013 Oct;52(10):1785-9423236191
Cites: J Clin Sleep Med. 2013;9(12):1333-924340296
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2014 Feb;31(1):95-10124131153
Cites: Biogerontology. 2015 Apr;16(2):209-1925078075
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2014 Mar;31(2):182-824131152
Cites: Arthritis Rheumatol. 2014 Mar;66(3):757-6724574238
Cites: Chronobiol Int. 2014 May;31(4):554-6324417521
Cites: Expert Rev Clin Immunol. 2014 May;10(5):687-9524684672
Cites: BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2014;15:21724957045
Cites: Nat Med. 2014 Aug;20(8):919-2625064128
Cites: Addiction. 2011 Jan;106(1):170-720883457
Cites: J Biol Rhythms. 2001 Apr;16(2):183-9011302560
PubMed ID
25470493 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiometabolic profile of people screened for high risk of type 2 diabetes in a national diabetes prevention programme (FIN-D2D).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138828
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2010 Dec;4(4):231-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Timo Saaristo
Leena Moilanen
Jari Jokelainen
Eeva Korpi-Hyövälti
Mauno Vanhala
Juha Saltevo
Leo Niskanen
Markku Peltonen
Heikki Oksa
Henna Cederberg
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Matti Uusitupa
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Author Affiliation
Pirkanmaa Hospital District, Tampere, Finland. timo.saaristo@pshp.fi
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2010 Dec;4(4):231-9
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Glucose Intolerance - blood - epidemiology
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
National Health Programs
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Primary Health Care
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
To study screening of high-risk individuals as part of a national diabetes prevention programme in primary health care settings in Finland between 2003 and 2007, and evaluate the cardiometabolic risk profile of persons identified for intervention.
High-risk individuals were identified by the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC), history of impaired fasting glucose (IFG), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), cardiovascular disease (CVD), or gestational diabetes. Participants subsequently underwent an oral glucose tolerance test. CVD morbidity risk was estimated by the Framingham Study Risk Equation and CVD mortality risk by the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation Formula (SCORE).
A high-risk cohort of 10,149 (of whom 30.3% men) was identified (mean age 54.7 for men, 53.0 for women). Altogether 18.8% of men and 11.5% of women had screen-detected diabetes. In total 68.1% of men and 49.4% of women had abnormal glucose tolerance (IFG, IGT or screen-detected diabetes). Furthermore, 43.2% and 41.5% of men, and 13.3% and 11.3% of women, respectively, had a high predicted risk of CVD morbidity or mortality.
Prevalence of dysglycemia including undiagnosed diabetes and the predicted risk for CVD was alarmly high in the identified high-risk cohort, particularly in men.
PubMed ID
21134669 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality in three different Finnish population cohorts with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107914
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 12;168(5):4734-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-12-2013
Author
Noël C Barengo
Riitta Antikainen
Markku Peltonen
Jaakko Tuomilehto
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Medicine/Internal Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; Universidad del Tolima, Ibagué, Colombia. Electronic address: noel.barengo@gmail.com.
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2013 Oct 12;168(5):4734-8
Date
Oct-12-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
We aimed to assess changes in cardiovascular (CVD) and all-cause mortality among diabetic and non-diabetic individuals between three large study cohorts with baseline assessments of 10 years apart and followed up for 10 years.
Six population surveys were carried out in 1972, 1977, 1982, 1987, 1992 and 1997 in Finland. For the analyses we combined the 1972 and 1977 cohorts (cohort 1), the 1982 and 1987 cohorts (cohort 2) and similarly also the 1992 and 1997 cohorts (cohort 3).
Age-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality and CVD in men without diabetes showed that both had a statistically significant decreased risk of all-cause mortality compared to the first cohort. No statistically significant changes in all-cause mortality were observed in men and women with diabetes between the latter two cohorts compared with the first after controlling for several covariates. In both men and women without diabetes, cohort 2 (men, HR=0.65; 95% CI 0.51-0.82; women, HR=0.54; 95% CI 0.32-0.89) and cohort 3 (men, HR=0.32; 95% CI 0.22-0.47; women, HR=0.31; 95% CI 0.14-0.68) showed a statistically significant decreased risk of CVD mortality compared to cohort 1. Age-adjusted HRs in regard to CVD mortality in men (HR=0.22; 95% CI 0.07-0.69) and women (HR=0.22; 95% CI 0.05-0.99) with diabetes of cohort 3 were statistically significantly lower than in cohort 1.
There seems to be a decrease in CVD mortality in people with diabetes indicating that treatment of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes patients may have improved during the last decade.
PubMed ID
23962774 View in PubMed
Less detail

104 records – page 1 of 11.