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Are cardiorespiratory fitness and walking performance associated with self-reported quality of life and work ability?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160866
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):257-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Lars Sörensen
Sari Honkalehto
Mauri Kallinen
Mika Pekkonen
Veikko Louhevaara
Juhani Smolander
Markku Alén
Author Affiliation
Suomen Terveystalo Oy, Vaajakoskentie 125, FIN-40800 Vaajakoski, Finland. lars.sorensen@fimnet.fi
Source
Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2007;20(3):257-64
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Task Performance and Analysis
Walking
Abstract
In Finland, testing cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) is popular in health promotion programs and work ability evaluations. The most common instruments used for this purpose are the submaximal cycle ergometer test, and the 2-km walking test. However, limited data exist on the associations between VO2max and wellbeing in working age adults. The aim of the study was to evaluate how the measured (cycle ergometer) and the estimated (walking test) VO2max and walking performance are associated with health-related quality of life and work ability.
The subjects were 104 middle-aged men workers (45-55 years old), mostly from the construction and manufacturing industries. VO2max was directly measured by a maximal exercise test on a cycle ergometer. The 2-km walking test parameters were the walking time, predicted VO2max, and fitness index. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the RAND-36 questionnaire which was further divided into physical dimensions (P-RAND-36) and mental dimensions (M-RAND-36). Perceived work ability was assessed with the work ability index (WAI) in a subgroup of 51 subjects.
The 2-km walking test parameters significantly predicted the score on P-RAND-36 (r2=0.18, p=0.001), and correlated significantly with WAI. The directly measured VO2max was not associated with P-RAND-36, M-RAND-36 or WAI.
The inexpensive 2-km walking test may be more useful when evaluating the quality of life and work ability, compared to the more expensive direct measurement of one's cardiorespiratory fitness in a laboratory.
PubMed ID
17932015 View in PubMed
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Assessing body composition with DXA and bioimpedance: effects of obesity, physical activity, and age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159040
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Mar;16(3):700-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Eszter Völgyi
Frances A Tylavsky
Arja Lyytikäinen
Harri Suominen
Markku Alén
Sulin Cheng
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Mar;16(3):700-5
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Algorithms
Body Composition
Body Fat Distribution
Electric Impedance
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - physiopathology
Overweight - physiopathology
Reproducibility of Results
Sex Factors
Abstract
This study evaluated to what extent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and two types of bioimpedance analysis (BIA) yield similar results for body fat mass (FM) in men and women with different levels of obesity and physical activity (PA).
The study population consisted of 37-81-year-old Finnish people (82 men and 86 women). FM% was estimated using DXA (GE Lunar Prodigy) and two BIA devices (InBody (720) and Tanita BC 418 MA). Subjects were divided into normal, overweight, and obese groups on the basis of clinical cutoff points of BMI, and into low PA (LPA) and high PA (HPA) groups. Agreement between the devices was calculated by using the Bland-Altman analysis.
Compared to DXA, both BIA devices provided on average 2-6% lower values for FM% in normal BMI men, in women in all BMI categories, and in both genders in both HPA and LPA groups. In obese men, the differences were smaller. The two BIA devices provided similar means for groups. Differences between the two BIA devices with increasing FM% were a result of the InBody (720) not including age in their algorithm for estimating body composition.
BIA methods provided systematically lower values for FM than DXA. However, the differences depend on gender and body weight status pointing out the importance of considering these when identifying people with excess FM.
PubMed ID
18239555 View in PubMed
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Association of low 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations with elevated parathyroid hormone concentrations and low cortical bone density in early pubertal and prepubertal Finnish girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183926
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3):485-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Sulin Cheng
Frances Tylavsky
Heikki Kröger
Merja Kärkkäinen
Arja Lyytikäinen
Arvo Koistinen
Anitta Mahonen
Markku Alen
Jussi Halleen
Kalervo Väänänen
Christel Lamberg-Allardt
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. cheng@sport.jyu.fi
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2003 Sep;78(3):485-92
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid Phosphatase - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Bone Density
Bone Resorption - diagnosis
Calcium - urine
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary - diagnosis - etiology - metabolism
Isoenzymes - blood
Parathyroid Hormone - blood
Puberty - metabolism
Seasons
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Abstract
Very few studies have evaluated both parathyroid hormone (PTH) and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and their effects on bone mass in children.
We studied the associations of serum 25(OH)D and intact PTH (iPTH) with bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) at different bone sites and the relation between serum 25(OH)D and iPTH in early pubertal and prepubertal Finnish girls.
The subjects were 10-12-y-old girls (n = 193) at Tanner stage 1 or 2, who reported a mean (+/- SD) dietary calcium intake of 733 +/- 288 mg/d. 25(OH)D, iPTH, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP 5b), urinary calcium excretion, BMC, areal BMD, and volumetric BMD were assessed by using different methods.
Thirty-two percent of the girls were vitamin D deficient [serum 25(OH)D
Notes
Erratum In: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jan;83(1):174
PubMed ID
12936933 View in PubMed
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Associations of disordered sleep with body fat distribution, physical activity and diet among overweight middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268366
Source
J Sleep Res. 2015 Aug;24(4):414-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Xiao Tan
Markku Alén
Shu Mei Cheng
Tuija M Mikkola
Jarkko Tenhunen
Arja Lyytikäinen
Petri Wiklund
Fengyu Cong
Antti Saarinen
Ina Tarkka
Markku Partinen
Sulin Cheng
Source
J Sleep Res. 2015 Aug;24(4):414-24
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Aged
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Exercise - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology
Overweight - epidemiology
Sleep Apnea, Obstructive - epidemiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate whether body fat distribution, physical activity levels and dietary intakes are associated with insomnia and/or obstructive sleep apnea among overweight middle-aged men. Participants were 211 Finnish men aged 30-65 years. Among the 163 overweight or obese participants, 40 had insomnia only, 23 had obstructive sleep apnea only, 24 had comorbid insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea and 76 were without sleep disorder. The remaining 48 participants had normal weight without sleep disorder. Fat mass, levels of physical activity and diet were assessed by dual-energy X-ray densitometry, physical activity questionnaire and 3-day food diary, respectively. Among the overweight participants, we found that: (i) groups with sleep disorders had higher fat mass in trunk and android regions than the group without sleep disorder (P = 0.048-0.004); (ii) the insomnia-only group showed a lower level of leisure-time physical activity (436.9 versus 986.5 MET min week(-1) , P = 0.009) and higher intake of saturated fatty acids (14.8 versus 12.7 E%, P = 0.011) than the group without sleep disorder; and (iii) the comorbid group had a lower level of leisure-time physical activity (344.4 versus 986.5 MET min week(-1) , P = 0.007) and lower folate intake (118.9 versus 152.1 µg, P = 0.002) than the group without sleep disorder, which were independent of body mass index. The results suggest that central obesity is associated with insomnia and/or obstructive sleep apnea. In addition, low levels of leisure-time physical activity and poor dietary intakes are related to insomnia or comorbid insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea among overweight men.
PubMed ID
25644747 View in PubMed
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Bone and body segment lengthening and widening: a 7-year follow-up study in pubertal girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142095
Source
Bone. 2010 Oct;47(4):773-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Eszter Völgyi
Frances A Tylavsky
Leiting Xu
Jian Lu
Qin Wang
Markku Alén
Sulin Cheng
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Bone. 2010 Oct;47(4):773-82
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body Height - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Bone Development - physiology
Child
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Menarche
Middle Aged
Puberty - physiology
Abstract
During growth bone increases in length and width as does the body size. The aim of this paper was to examine the growth pattern of body height and weight, and the width and length of various body segments, and to establish the timing of peak growth velocity (PV) in relation to time of menarche in a cohort of Finnish girls followed from age 10 until 18. The study was a 7-year longitudinal cohort study. Widths and lengths of body segments and bones were measured from DXA scan images using bone landmarks in 396 girls aged 10 to 13 years at baseline, and in 255 mothers and 159 grandmothers. The girls' growth velocities (rate of change with time) peaked at 13.5 months prior to menarche for height, 14.4 months for weight, and 15.4 months for BMI. Shoulder width peaked at 18.2 months, lesser pelvis width at 13.5 months and greater pelvis width at 11.6 months prior to menarche. The PV of various body segment lengths showed that the femur peaked earliest at 20.7 months prior to menarche, followed by the humerus (at 18.0 months), radius (at 17.4 months), tibia (at 17.5 months), and trunk (at 11.8 months), respectively. All the long bones were linearly correlated with height while the flat and irregular bones had a nonlinear growth relationship with height (r(2)=0.73-0.88). By the age of 18 years the girls had reached their mothers' height (101%) and humerus, radius, femur and tibia lengths (100-101%), but not their mothers' shoulder, great pelvis and lesser pelvis widths (98%, 95% and 93%, respectively). Our data confirmed that, after bone elongation had ceased, segment width continued to increase, although at a slower speed, into early adulthood. The wide variations in growth velocity of these anthropomorphic measurements underscore the need to optimize nutrition and physical activity from early puberty onward in order to maximize bone development.
PubMed ID
20637322 View in PubMed
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Bone density, structure and strength, and their determinants in aging sprint athletes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122761
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Dec;44(12):2340-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Marko T Korhonen
Ari Heinonen
Jaana Siekkinen
Juha Isolehto
Markku Alén
Ilkka Kiviranta
Harri Suominen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. marko.t.korhonen@jyu.fi
Source
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2012 Dec;44(12):2340-9
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology
Athletes
Bone Density - physiology
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Running - physiology
Weight-Bearing - physiology
Abstract
This study was undertaken to examine bone properties in masters sprinters of different ages and younger reference subjects. In addition, the association of sport-specific ground reaction force, muscle, training, and hormone characteristics with the bone parameters was evaluated in the athletes.
Bone densitometric, structural, and strength parameters were assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the distal and midtibia in 83 male sprinters (40-85 yr) and 19 physically active referents (31-45 yr). Between-group differences were analyzed by ANCOVA with body mass and height as covariates.
Bone values were generally greater in athletes than referents, the greatest differences being in bending strength of the tibia shaft as estimated by maximum moment of inertia (Imax). Among athletes, trabecular volumetric bone mineral density of distal tibia was 12% (P
PubMed ID
22776884 View in PubMed
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Differences in muscle and adipose tissue gene expression and cardio-metabolic risk factors in the members of physical activity discordant twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140570
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(9)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Tuija Leskinen
Rita Rinnankoski-Tuikka
Mirva Rintala
Tuulikki Seppänen-Laakso
Eija Pöllänen
Markku Alen
Sarianna Sipilä
Jaakko Kaprio
Vuokko Kovanen
Paavo Rahkila
Matej Oresic
Heikki Kainulainen
Urho M Kujala
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2010;5(9)
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Aged
Cholesterol, HDL - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Energy Metabolism
Female
Finland
Gene Expression Regulation
Heart Diseases - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism - physiopathology
Humans
Lipid Metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Muscle, Skeletal - metabolism
Risk factors
Twins - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
High physical activity/aerobic fitness predicts low morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to identify the most up-regulated gene sets related to long-term physical activity vs. inactivity in skeletal muscle and adipose tissues and to obtain further information about their link with cardio-metabolic risk factors. We studied ten same-sex twin pairs (age range 50-74 years) who had been discordant for leisure-time physical activity for 30 years. The examinations included biopsies from m. vastus lateralis and abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. RNA was analyzed with the genome-wide Illumina Human WG-6 v3.0 Expression BeadChip. For pathway analysis we used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis utilizing active vs. inactive co-twin gene expression ratios. Our findings showed that among the physically active members of twin pairs, as compared to their inactive co-twins, gene expression in the muscle tissue samples was chronically up-regulated for the central pathways related to energy metabolism, including oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism and supportive metabolic pathways. Up-regulation of these pathways was associated in particular with aerobic fitness and high HDL cholesterol levels. In fat tissue we found physical activity-associated increases in the expression of polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism and branched-chain amino acid degradation gene sets both of which associated with decreased 'high-risk' ectopic body fat and plasma glucose levels. Consistent with other findings, plasma lipidomics analysis showed up-regulation of the triacylglycerols containing the polyunsaturated fatty acids. Our findings identified skeletal muscle and fat tissue pathways which are associated with the long-term physical activity and reduced cardio-metabolic disease risk, including increased aerobic fitness. In particular, improved skeletal muscle oxidative energy and lipid metabolism as well as changes in adipocyte function and redistribution of body fat are associated with reduced cardio-metabolic risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20862330 View in PubMed
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Does systemic low-grade inflammation associate with fat accumulation and distribution? A 7-year follow-up study with peripubertal girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105312
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):1411-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Xinfei Wen
Satu Pekkala
Renwei Wang
Petri Wiklund
Guoshaung Feng
Shu Mei Cheng
Xiao Tan
Yang Liu
Peijie Chen
Johan G Eriksson
Markku Alen
Sulin Cheng
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology (X.W., R.W., Y.L., P.C., S.C.), Shanghai University of Sport, Shanghai 200438, China; Department of Health Sciences (X.W., S.P., P.W., S.M.C., X.T., Y.L., S.C.), University of Jyväskylä, FIN-40014 Jyväskylä, Finland; National Center for Public Health Surveillance and Information Services (G.F.), Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China; Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care (J.G.E.), Helsinki University, and Unit of General Practice (J.G.E.), Helsinki University Central Hospital, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland; Folkhälsan Research Centre (J.G.E.), FIN-00250 Helsinki, Finland; Department of Medical Rehabilitation (P.W., S.M.C., M.A.), Oulu University Hospital, FIN-90221, Oulu, Finland; and Institute of Health Sciences, University of Oulu, FIN-90220 Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Apr;99(4):1411-9
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adolescent
Body Fat Distribution
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Inflammation - metabolism
Lipid Metabolism
Obesity - epidemiology
Puberty - metabolism
Abstract
Knowledge about the interrelationship between adiposity and systemic low-grade inflammation during pubertal growth is important in detecting early signs of obesity-related metabolic disorders.
The objective of the study was to evaluate the developmental trajectories of fat mass (FM) and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels and factors that could explain the relationship between FM and hsCRP in girls from prepuberty to early adulthood.
This was a 7.5-year longitudinal study.
The study was conducted at the University of Jyväskylä Sports and Health Science laboratory.
Three hundred ninety-six healthy Finnish girls aged 11.2 ± 0.8 years participated in the study.
Body composition was assessed by a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum concentrations of hsCRP, adipokines, and sex hormones by ELISA.
Both FM and hsCRP increased with age and had similar trajectories but different inter- and intravariance patterns. A joint analysis of fat distribution and hsCRP indicated that the linkage probabilities across different trajectory subgroups between regional FM and the corresponding hsCRP levels varied from 16% to 53%. In a longitudinal regression model, the common predictor for both FM and hsCRP was T (ß = .065, P
PubMed ID
24423339 View in PubMed
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Effect of Six-Month Diet Intervention on Sleep among Overweight and Obese Men with Chronic Insomnia Symptoms: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281684
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Nov 23;8(11)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2016
Author
Xiao Tan
Markku Alén
Kun Wang
Jarkko Tenhunen
Petri Wiklund
Markku Partinen
Sulin Cheng
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Nov 23;8(11)
Date
Nov-23-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body mass index
Caloric Restriction
Counseling
Diet, Reducing
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Nutritive Value
Obesity - complications - diet therapy - physiopathology
Reaction Time
Sleep
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Growing evidence suggests that diet alteration affects sleep, but this has not yet been studied in adults with insomnia symptoms. We aimed to determine the effect of a six-month diet intervention on sleep among overweight and obese (Body mass index, BMI = 25 kg/m²) men with chronic insomnia symptoms. Forty-nine men aged 30-65 years with chronic insomnia symptoms were randomized into diet (n = 28) or control (n = 21) groups. The diet group underwent a six-month individualized diet intervention with three face-to-face counseling sessions and online supervision 1-3 times per week; 300-500 kcal/day less energy intake and optimized nutrient composition were recommended. Controls were instructed to maintain their habitual lifestyle. Sleep parameters were determined by piezoelectric bed sensors, a sleep diary, and a Basic Nordic sleep questionnaire. Compared to the controls, the diet group had shorter objective sleep onset latency after intervention. Within the diet group, prolonged objective total sleep time, improved objective sleep efficiency, lower depression score, less subjective nocturnal awakenings, and nocturia were found after intervention. In conclusion, modest energy restriction and optimized nutrient composition shorten sleep onset latency in overweight and obese men with insomnia symptoms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27886073 View in PubMed
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Effects of aerobic exercise on home-based sleep among overweight and obese men with chronic insomnia symptoms: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287316
Source
Sleep Med. 2016 Sep;25:113-121
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Xiao Tan
Markku Alén
Petri Wiklund
Markku Partinen
Sulin Cheng
Source
Sleep Med. 2016 Sep;25:113-121
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anthropometry
Diet - trends
Exercise - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Overweight - complications
Sleep - physiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - complications - diagnosis
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To determine the effect of a six-month aerobic exercise program on home-based sleep quality among overweight and obese men with chronic insomnia symptoms.
Participants were 45 Finnish men (93% had body mass index =25) aged 30-65 years, with chronic (=3 months) insomnia symptoms as classified by the DSM-IV criteria. Participants were randomized into an exercise (n?=?24) or control group (n?=?21). The exercise group received six-month aerobic exercise intervention with one to five sessions per week of 30-60 minutes duration. The control group was instructed to maintain habitual lifestyle behaviors during the study period. Seven-night home sleep was measured with a piezoelectric bed sensor and sleep diary. Other assessments included the modified Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire, a health and behavior questionnaire, physical activity and diet diaries, anthropometry, fat mass, and physical fitness. Analysis of covariance controlling for baseline values, and repeated-measures analysis of variance were implemented for time-by-group comparisons and within-group comparisons, respectively.
At six months, the exercise group showed reduced objective sleep onset latency (p?=?0.010) and lowered frequency of difficulty initiating sleep (p?=?0.021) than controls. Although a time-by-group difference was not significant, exercisers showed shorter objective wake after sleep onset (p?=?0.004), reduced subjective nocturnal awakenings (p?=?0.010), improved objective sleep efficiency (p?
PubMed ID
27823703 View in PubMed
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