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Are applicants to Canadian residency programs rejected because of their sex?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171689
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Dec 6;173(12):1439-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-6-2005
Author
Mark O Baerlocher
Allan S Detsky
Author Affiliation
Radiology Residency Training Program, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Dec 6;173(12):1439-40
Date
Dec-6-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - manpower
Male
Odds Ratio
Prejudice
School Admission Criteria
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 Apr 27;170(9):1385-615111465
Comment In: CMAJ. 2006 May 9;174(10):145016682718
PubMed ID
16330629 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of and influences on residents in English Canadian radiology programs regarding interventional radiology: results of a national survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association (CIRA).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172436
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2005 Oct;16(10):1349-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Mark O Baerlocher
Murray R Asch
Hayeems Eran
Author Affiliation
Department of Interventional Radiology, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mark.baerlocher@utoronto.ca
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2005 Oct;16(10):1349-54
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Questionnaires
Radiology, Interventional - education
Societies, Medical
United States
Abstract
There has been a North American trend toward reduced application to the subspecialty of Interventional Radiology (IR). Out of fear of a looming manpower shortage, this survey was conducted to better understand awareness and attitudes toward IR by radiology residents-in-training.
An anonymous online survey was emailed to the Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program Director/Department Chairperson of each of the 13 English medical schools in Canada, to be forwarded to each respective Radiology Residency Program's radiology residents. The survey was open for a period of 1 month. The survey consisted of 29 questions, which could be answered online using a web-based program. Responses to questions were tabulated and comments recorded.
A total of 84 survey responses were received of a possible 333 (25%), including responses from each of the 13 English Programs. Responses regarding demographics, training, careers aspirations and motivations, and influences were collected. Fifty-one percent of respondents reported being either "moderately" or "very" interested in the field of IR; however, only 13% reported intention to perform an IR fellowship. A number of issues were identified as dissuading current radiology residents from pursuing IR, including income, work hours and hours of on-call, and turf issues.
A number of issues were identified as factors which prevented residents with an interest in IR from applying to IR fellowships. These must be addressed to increase IR recruitment rates of radiology residents.
PubMed ID
16221906 View in PubMed
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Awareness of interventional radiology among patients referred to the interventional radiology department: a survey of patients in a large Canadian community hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163608
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2007 May;18(5):633-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Mark O Baerlocher
Murray R Asch
Gaurav Puri
Andrew Vellahottam
Andy Myers
Karen Andrews
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. mark.baerlocher@utoronto.ca
Source
J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2007 May;18(5):633-7
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awareness
Canada
Health Care Surveys
Health education
Hospitals, Community
Humans
Prospective Studies
Radiology, Interventional
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
To quantify the level of knowledge about interventional radiology (IR) among patients referred for an IR procedure and to develop recommendations on how to increase public awareness of IR.
Paper surveys were prospectively administered to consecutive patients scheduled to undergo an IR procedure at a community hospital. The study was terminated at the accrual of 100 completed surveys.
Totals of 28% and 6% knew generally the job of a diagnostic radiologist and interventional radiologist, respectively, and 6% had heard of the field of IR before their referral (despite 21% having undergone a procedure previously). Before their arrival in the IR department, 87% had not received any information about IR. Three percent, 0%, 4%, 82%, and 82% had heard about uterine artery embolization, radiofrequency ablation, vertebroplasty, biopsy (any type), and angioplasty, respectively. After the procedures, 84% had a clearer view of what interventional radiologists do, but 98% believed that most others did not know what IR was. When asked how best to educate the public about IR, the responses were: unsure (39%), other (19%), pamphlets (12%), information from physicians (9%), television (8%), and Internet (7%). Overall, the mean satisfaction rate was 8.8 (with 0 representing the minimum and 10 representing the maximum), and 97% would choose IR over surgery for future treatments.
These data quantify and strongly support the views that (1) even among patients specifically referred to IR for a procedure, the majority of people are unaware of what the field is or may offer; and (2) most patients were satisfied with their IR experience. Six results-based recommendations are made to increase public awareness about IR.
PubMed ID
17494845 View in PubMed
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Canada's future physicians: clinicians, researchers or teachers?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169190
Source
CMAJ. 2006 May 23;174(11):1549
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-23-2006
Author
Mark O Baerlocher
Source
CMAJ. 2006 May 23;174(11):1549
Date
May-23-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical research
Canada
Career Mobility
Data Collection
Education, Medical
Humans
Income
Students, Medical
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2007 Jan 2;176(1):68; author reply 6817200402
PubMed ID
16717261 View in PubMed
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Comparison of Canadian medical graduates and international medical graduates in Canada: 1989-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133544
Source
Acad Med. 2011 Aug;86(8):962-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Philip S Mok
Mark O Baerlocher
Caroline Abrahams
Eva Y Tan
Steve Slade
Sarita Verma
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Imaging, University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine, Ontario, Canada. philip.mok@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2011 Aug;86(8):962-7
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Demography
Education, Medical, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Female
Foreign Medical Graduates - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To compare Canadian medical graduates (CMGs) and international medical graduates (IMGs) who completed postgraduate medical education in Canada from 1989 to 2007 by age, gender, specialty, and practice characteristics.
Data on all CMGs and IMGs who completed residencies or fellowships in Canada from 1989 to 2007 were extracted from the Canadian Post-M.D. Education Registry. Data from 1989-1993 and 2003-2007 were pooled for analysis.
A total of 8,501 CMGs and 1,828 IMGs completed post-MD training at Canadian institutions between 1989 and 1993 inclusive; 7,734 CMGs and 1,879 IMGs completed such training between 2003 and 2007. From 1989-1993 to 2003-2007, the average age of CMGs increased from 29.8 to 31.1 years, and average age of IMGs increased from 36.1 to 37.0 years. From 1989-1993 to 2003-2007, the percentage of women increased from 41% (3,471/8,501) to 52% (4,016/7,734) and from 28% (509/1,828) to 42% (791/1,879) for CMGs and IMGs, respectively. The proportion of CMGs who trained in family medicine declined from 54% (4,568/8,501) to 38% (2,921/7,734) from 1989-1993 to 2003-2007. The percentage of IMGs who trained in family medicine increased from 19% (344/1,828) to 37% (699/1,879) during the same period.
IMGs tended to be older, more likely to be men, and more likely to pursue family medicine than their CMG counterparts. These differences have implications in designing future health care policy and recruiting physicians from abroad. Other countries could look at their own physician demographics using this study's methods.
PubMed ID
21694557 View in PubMed
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Current issues of interventional radiology in Canada: a national survey by the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173023
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2005 Jun;56(3):129-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Mark O Baerlocher
Murray R Asch
Eran Hayeems
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. mark.baerlocher@utoronto.ca
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2005 Jun;56(3):129-39
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Questionnaires
Radiology, Interventional - statistics & numerical data
Societies, Medical
Abstract
To determine current issues facing the field of interventional radiology (IR) in Canada.
An anonymous online survey was emailed to all members of the Canadian Interventional Radiology Association. The survey was open for 1 month.
A total of 83 survey responses were received (of an estimated possible 233). Responses regarding demographics, aspects of practice, research, and IR trainee education were collected.
Several issues were identified as pertinent to Canadian interventional radiologists, including a current and future drought of interventional radiologists, a lack of women in the profession, inadequate protected research time for those in academic practice, a lack of protected clinical time, concern regarding turf issues with other specialties, division between interventional and diagnostic radiology, and the ideal profile of the future interventional radiologist. The field of interventional radiology (IR) continues to develop, expand, and mature at a rapid pace. As the field is still relatively young, several issues are bound to arise. It is important therefore to stay abreast of the current trends and opinions of practitioners within the field.
PubMed ID
16144272 View in PubMed
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Do richer provinces have shorter waiting times to see specialists?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170731
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Feb 14;174(4):447
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2006
Author
Mark O Baerlocher
Allan S Detsky
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Feb 14;174(4):447
Date
Feb-14-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Economics - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Specialization
Waiting Lists
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2006 May 23;174(11):159916717277
Comment In: CMAJ. 2006 May 23;174(11):159916717276
PubMed ID
16477050 View in PubMed
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Factors leading to radiology career selection: results of the 2004 National Physician Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168070
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2006 Jun;57(3):175-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Luke Maj
Mark O Baerlocher
Author Affiliation
Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine, Rootstown, Ohio, USA.
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2006 Jun;57(3):175-8
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Choice
Data Collection
Humans
Radiology - manpower
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
Data from the 2004 National Physician Survey were used to determine when current Canadian radiologists made their decision to pursue a radiology career and to determine which factors were most influential in their decision. Most respondents reported having made this decision during their clerkship years of medical school (32.7%) or after a period of time in practice (25.4%). The most influential factors involved in this decision were perceived intellectual stimulation and workload flexibility or predictability. These results provide insight into the trainee's decision to pursue radiology and may be useful to those recruiting for radiology as well to medical students considering the field.
PubMed ID
16881475 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2004 Dec;55(5):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Mark O Baerlocher
Murray R Asch
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont. mark.baerlocher@utoronto.ca
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2004 Dec;55(5):315-20
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada
Forecasting
Humans
Internship and Residency - trends
Middle Aged
Radiology - education - manpower - trends
Radiology, Interventional - education - trends
Research - education - trends
Research Support as Topic
United States
Abstract
The field of radiology has grown significantly over the past 25 years. This can in large part be attributed to advances in research and, indeed, the future of the field depends on this continued tradition. Although funding to radiology research has increased substantially in the past decade, much of the research is being carried out by researchers who are not radiologists, with research funding being distributed accordingly. There are clear indications that too few radiologists are performing research for a variety of reasons, including a shortage of time, training and manpower. At the same time, there are indications that radiologists-in-training (fellows, residents and medical students) are interested in a future dual clinical-research career. We review the issues pertinent to research in radiology, with a focus on interventional radiology, at a time when the fostering of research in radiology has become of paramount importance.
PubMed ID
15646461 View in PubMed
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Happy doctors? Satisfaction with professional life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169858
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Apr 11;174(8):1079
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-11-2006
Author
Mark O Baerlocher
Source
CMAJ. 2006 Apr 11;174(8):1079
Date
Apr-11-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Medicine
Physicians
Specialization
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 2006 Jun 6;174(12):174616754909
PubMed ID
16606952 View in PubMed
Less detail

17 records – page 1 of 2.