Skip header and navigation

Refine By

21 records – page 1 of 3.

Advocating for assistance with pregnancy planning in HIV-positive individuals and couples: an idea whose time has come.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135713
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2011 Mar;33(3):269-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Mark H Yudin
Mona Loutfy
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2011 Mar;33(3):269-71
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family Planning Services
Female
HIV Seropositivity
Humans
Infertility - therapy
Male
Pregnancy
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
PubMed ID
21453568 View in PubMed
Less detail

Screening and management of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155227
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Aug;30(8):702-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Mark H Yudin
Deborah M Money
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Aug;30(8):702-16
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Canada
Female
Gynecology
Humans
Mass Screening
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Obstetrics
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - diagnosis - drug therapy
Pregnancy outcome
Premature Birth - prevention & control
Prevalence
Risk
Societies, Medical
Treatment Outcome
Vaginosis, Bacterial - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
To review the evidence and provide recommendations on screening for and management of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy.
The clinical practice options considered in formulating the guideline.
Outcomes evaluated include antibiotic treatment efficacy and cure rates, and the influence of the treatment of bacterial vaginosis on the rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm labour and delivery and preterm premature rupture of membranes.
Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched for articles, published in English before the end of June 2007 on the topic of bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy.
The evidence obtained was rated using the criteria developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.
Guideline implementation will assist the practitioner in developing an approach to the diagnosis and treatment of bacterial vaginosis in pregnant women. Patients will benefit from appropriate management of this condition.
These guidelines have been prepared by the Infectious Diseases Committee of the SOGC, and approved by the Executive and Council of the SOGC.
The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada.
PubMed ID
18786293 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of patient education on knowledge of influenza and vaccine recommendations among pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143300
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Mar;32(3):232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Mark H Yudin
Maryam Salripour
Michael D Sgro
Author Affiliation
Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2010 Mar;32(3):232-7
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Influenza Vaccines
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Ontario
Pamphlets
Patient Education as Topic
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To determine whether providing an information pamphlet in the antenatal clinic improves women's knowledge about influenza and vaccine recommendations during pregnancy.
An information pamphlet was distributed in the antenatal clinic during the fall of 2007. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in women on the postpartum floor in the fall of 2006 and again in the fall of 2007 (before and after implementation of the pamphlet) to assess women's knowledge. Results were compared to assess knowledge transfer.
Knowledge improved with the use of the educational pamphlet. Most women in both years (>90%) correctly answered that influenza is a serious infection. However, significantly more women in 2007 correctly answered that pregnant women have a higher risk of complications from influenza (34.6% in 2007 vs. 12.1% in 2006, P
PubMed ID
20500967 View in PubMed
Less detail

Pregnant women's knowledge of influenza and the use and safety of the influenza vaccine during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151812
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Feb;31(2):120-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Mark H Yudin
Maryam Salaripour
Michael D Sgro
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Feb;31(2):120-5
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Influenza Vaccines
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Ontario
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Safety
Abstract
We wished to assess pregnant women's knowledge of influenza, vaccine safety during pregnancy and breast feeding, and the recommendations for use of the influenza vaccine in pregnancy.
We performed a cross-sectional survey of postpartum women during influenza season in 2006.
Pregnant women's overall knowledge of these subjects was poor. Most women (95%) knew that influenza is highly contagious, but almost 90% incorrectly believed that pregnant women have the same risk of complications as non-pregnant women. Only one half of the women were aware of national recommendations for vaccination during pregnancy and that the vaccine is safe during pregnancy and breast feeding, and 80% incorrectly believed that the vaccine can cause birth defects. Only 20% of women had been offered the vaccine during the current pregnancy or a prior pregnancy.
Pregnant women's knowledge about influenza vaccine recommendations and safety during pregnancy is poor. There is substantial room for improvement among prenatal care providers in both patient education and offering the vaccine.
PubMed ID
19327210 View in PubMed
Less detail

Gonorrhea as a moving target: how do we sharpen our aim and strengthen our arrows?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115762
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Feb;35(2):174-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mark H Yudin
Travis Salway Hottes
Gina S Ogilvie
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, St. Michael's Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Feb;35(2):174-6
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Canada - epidemiology
Cephalosporin Resistance
Cephalosporins - therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Gonorrhea - drug therapy - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
PubMed ID
23470069 View in PubMed
Less detail

Self-reported protective behaviour against West Nile Virus among pregnant women in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152921
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Dec;30(12):1103-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Lana Kiehn
Kellie E Murphy
Mark H Yudin
Mark Loeb
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Dec;30(12):1103-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - prevention & control
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - prevention & control
Questionnaires
West Nile Fever - prevention & control - transmission
West Nile virus
Abstract
West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging infection that can lead to substantial morbidity and mortality. Although data are limited with respect to the risk to the fetus and neonate, this risk is not inconsequential. Methods to reduce the risk of mosquito bites and WNV transmission are simple, economical, and effective in the non-pregnant population. The objective of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to assess adherence to protective behaviours against WNV in pregnant women and to determine predictors for such adherence.
A questionnaire was administered to all consenting pregnant women at two Toronto university hospitals.
The majority of women reported practising behaviours that reduce the risk of mosquito bites and potentially of WNV infection. In this survey, between 40% and 80% of pregnant women avoided the outdoors, avoided areas with mosquitoes, and reported practising two or more personal protection behaviours. However, only 33% of pregnant women reported wearing mosquito repellent, with the majority expressing concern about the safety of repellent use during pregnancy. The majority of pregnant women cited the media or the Internet as a source of their knowledge about WNV; only 12% reported their physician as a source of such knowledge.
The majority of pregnant women are aware of WNV and practise protective behaviours that reduce the risk of transmission. However, they have unjustified fetal safety concerns about the use of mosquito repellent and are thus less likely to use it.
PubMed ID
19175961 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of ethnicity on awareness and knowledge of and attitudes towards the human papillomavirus and vaccine among adult women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106095
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Nov;35(11):995-1003
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Sharon A Sadry
Leanne R De Souza
Mark H Yudin
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2013 Nov;35(11):995-1003
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
African Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Asian Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Papillomaviridae
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine whether ethnicity affects awareness, knowledge, and attitudes regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) and the HPV vaccine.
English speaking women (n = 172) aged 18 and older were recruited from an outpatient gynaecology clinic to complete a self-administered cross-sectional questionnaire that gathered information about (1) virus awareness and knowledge, (2) vaccine awareness and knowledge, (3) attitudes towards the vaccine and (4) participant demographics. Subjects received a virus knowledge score (0 to 6), a vaccine knowledge score (0 to 10) and an attitudes score (8 to 40), with a higher score indicating more positive attitudes towards the vaccine.
Virus and vaccine awareness was significantly higher in Caucasian respondents than in non-Caucasian respondents: 93% versus 69% (P
PubMed ID
24246399 View in PubMed
Less detail

Obstetric risks and outcomes of refugee women at a single centre in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104346
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2014 Apr;36(4):296-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Tharani Kandasamy
Rebecca Cherniak
Rajiv Shah
Mark H Yudin
Rachel Spitzer
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Toronto, Toronto ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2014 Apr;36(4):296-302
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Ontario
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Refugees - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
Women who are refugees during pregnancy may be exposed to homelessness, poor nutrition, and limited access to health care, yet the pregnancy outcomes of this vulnerable population have not been systematically evaluated. We undertook a study to determine the risk of adverse obstetric and perinatal outcomes among refugee women in Toronto.
Using a retrospective cohort design, we examined pregnancy outcomes for refugee and non-refugee women delivering at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2010. The primary outcome measures were preterm delivery (
PubMed ID
24798666 View in PubMed
Less detail

HIV mother-to-child transmission, mode of delivery, and duration of rupture of membranes: experience in the current era.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123523
Source
Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2012;2012:267969
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Siobhan Mark
Kellie E Murphy
Stanley Read
Ari Bitnun
Mark H Yudin
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, 92 College Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1L4. siobhan.mark@gmail.com
Source
Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol. 2012;2012:267969
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amnion
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
Cohort Studies
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy - transmission - virology
Humans
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical - statistics & numerical data
Labor Onset
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - drug therapy
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Viral Load
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate whether the length of time of rupture of membranes (ROM) in optimally managed HIV-positive women on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with low viral loads (VL) is predictive of the risk of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
A retrospective case series of all HIV-positive women who delivered at two academic tertiary centers in Toronto, Canada from January 2000 to November 2010 was completed.
Two hundred and ten HIV-positive women with viral loads
Notes
Cites: Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 1999 Sep;66(3):305-610580685
Cites: Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2003 Jul;82(1):17-2312834937
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Aug;173(2):585-97645638
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Jun 20;334(25):1617-238628356
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Jul 1;280(1):55-609660364
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Apr 1;340(13):977-8710099139
Cites: HIV Med. 2011 Apr;12(4):228-3520726902
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2005 Feb 1;40(3):458-6515668871
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2005;(4):CD00547916235405
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Jul 26;372(9635):293-918657708
Cites: Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2009 Winter;16(1):e68-7719151422
Cites: Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(8):882-719557554
Cites: PLoS One. 2009;4(12):e792519997556
Cites: Lancet. 1999 Mar 27;353(9158):1035-910199349
PubMed ID
22690108 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 records – page 1 of 3.