Skip header and navigation

Refine By

23 records – page 1 of 3.

Adherence to the Baltic Sea diet consumed in the Nordic countries is associated with lower abdominal obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124508
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):520-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-14-2013
Author
Noora Kanerva
Niina E Kaartinen
Ursula Schwab
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Satu Männistö
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, FI-00270 Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Feb 14;109(3):520-8
Date
Feb-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Baltic States
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits - ethnology
Food Quality
Food Supply
Health promotion
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
North Sea
Nutrition Policy
Obesity, Abdominal - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Patient compliance
Risk factors
Waist Circumference - ethnology
Abstract
Due to differences in food cultures, dietary quality measures, such as the Mediterranean Diet Score, may not be easily adopted by other countries. Recently, the Baltic Sea Diet Pyramid was developed to illustrate healthy choices for the diet consumed in the Nordic countries. We assessed whether the Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) based on the Pyramid is associated with a decreased risk of obesity and abdominal obesity. The population-based cross-sectional study included 4720 Finns (25-74 years) from the National FINRISK 2007 study. Diet was assessed using a validated FFQ. The score included Nordic fruits and berries, vegetables, cereals, ratio of PUFA:SFA and trans-fatty acids, low-fat milk, fish, red and processed meat, total fat (percentage of energy), and alcohol. Height, weight and waist circumference (WC) were measured and BMI values were calculated. In a multivariable model, men in the highest v. lowest BSDS quintile were more likely to have normal WC (OR 0·48, 95 % CI 0·29, 0·80). In women, this association was similar but not significant (OR 0·65, 95 % CI 0·39, 1·09). The association appeared to be stronger in younger age groups (men: OR 0·23, 95 % CI 0·08, 0·62; women: OR 0·17, 95 % CI 0·05, 0·58) compared with older age groups. Nordic cereals and alcohol were found to be the most important BSDS components related to WC. No association was observed between the BSDS and BMI. The present study suggests that combination of Nordic foods, especially cereals and moderate alcohol consumption, is likely to be inversely associated with abdominal obesity.
PubMed ID
22575060 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associates of obesity and weight dissatisfaction among Finnish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186700
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Feb;6(1):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Vera Mikkilä
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Pirjo Pietinen
Suvi M Virtanen
Matti Rimpelä
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. vera.mikkila@helsinki.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2003 Feb;6(1):49-56
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Body Image
Body Weight
Education
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Obesity - psychology
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
We investigated behavioural and socio-economic factors associated with obesity and weight dissatisfaction among Finnish adolescents.
A total of 60,252 Finnish adolescents aged 14 to 16 years filled in a questionnaire about their health, health behaviour and socio-economic background. Food choices were obtained by using a short food-frequency questionnaire. Obesity was defined as a weight at least 120% of the sex- and height-specific mean weight for subjects.
Of girls and boys, 54% and 66%, respectively, were satisfied with their weight. Among dissatisfied normal-weight adolescents, 81% of girls but only 48% of boys thought they were overweight. Of obese boys, 25% were satisfied with their weight. For both genders, obesity and weight dissatisfaction were associated with economic problems in the family. In girls, an association was also found with poor school performance, low educational level of parents and not having evening meals at home; and in boys, with physical inactivity and not eating school lunch. Smoking was more common among girls who were dissatisfied with their weight. Differences in food choices were small between different weight and weight satisfaction categories.
Having normal weight and being satisfied with that weight are favourable for an adolescent. Obesity and weight dissatisfaction are associated mostly with disadvantageous health behaviours and low socio-economic status. Health behaviour seems to be associated more with weight satisfaction than with actual weight.
PubMed ID
12581465 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of age and education with different types of leisure-time physical activity among 4437 Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157943
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2008 Mar;5(2):242-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Katja Borodulin
Tiina Laatikainen
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Pekka Jousilahti
Timo A Lakka
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Dept of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Phys Act Health. 2008 Mar;5(2):242-51
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Educational Status
Exercise
Female
Finland
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of age and education with types of leisure-time physical activity in a population sample of Finnish adults.
The sample, part of the National FINRISK Study, comprised 1940 men and 2497 women age 25 to 64 years. Self-reported questionnaires were used to collect data on education and leisure-time physical activity. Overall leisure-time physical activity was further divided into conditioning and daily physical activity.
In men and women, age had an inverse association with conditioning physical activity but not with daily and overall leisure activity. Strong direct associations were found between education and conditioning and overall leisure activity.
All age groups report fairly similar levels of overall and daily levels of leisure-time physical activity, but the levels differ across educational groups. In health promotion, more emphasis should be targeted to the population groups with lower education.
PubMed ID
18382033 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between estimated aerobic fitness and cardiovascular risk factors in adults with different levels of abdominal obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175619
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Apr;12(2):126-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Katja Borodulin
Tiina Laatikainen
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Timo A Lakka
Raija Laukkanen
Seppo Sarna
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, Helsinki, Finland. katja.borodulin@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Apr;12(2):126-31
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Blood Chemical Analysis
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise - physiology
Exercise Test
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
We investigated the association between estimated aerobic fitness and cardiovascular risk factors, and how the association is affected by abdominal obesity.
Cross-sectional population study.
Participants comprised 3820 adults aged 25 to 64 years from the FINRISK 2002 Study in Finland. Aerobic fitness was estimated using a non-exercise test. Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), blood pressure, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides, HDL-C to total cholesterol ratio, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) levels were measured by standardized methods.
After controlling for age, smoking and alcohol consumption, aerobic fitness was inversely associated with systolic (P=0.027) and diastolic (P
PubMed ID
15785297 View in PubMed
Less detail

Awareness and use of the Heart Symbol by Finnish consumers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132272
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):476-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Satu Helakorpi
Mari Olli
Erkki Vartiainen
Pekka Puska
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Helsinki, Finland. marjaana.lahti-koski@sydanliitto.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):476-82
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Labeling
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Heart
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Symbolism
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the awareness of the Heart Symbol in different age and educational groups, and changes in the awareness over a 9-year period. In addition, the reported use of products with the symbol was examined.
A series of annual cross-sectional postal surveys on Health Behaviour and Health among the Finnish Adult Population.
A random sample (n 5000 per annum) from the Finnish population aged 15-64 years, drawn from the National Population Register, received a questionnaire.
Men and women (n 29 378) participating in the surveys in 2000-2009.
At the early 2000s, 48 % of men and 73 % of women reported to be familiar with the symbol. The corresponding rates were 66 % for men and 91 % for women in 2009. The reported use of products with the symbol increased from 29 % to 52 % in men and from 40 % to 72 % in women. In men, the awareness did not vary by age, whereas older women (45-64 years) were less likely to be aware of the symbol compared with younger women (25-34 years). Men and women with the highest education were best aware of the symbol and more likely to use the products in the early 2000s. The educational differences diminished or disappeared during the study period.
The majority of Finnish adults are familiar with the Heart Symbol, and the reported use of such products increased in all age and educational groups, especially among the less educated. The symbol may work as an effective measure to diminish nutrition-related health inequalities.
Notes
Comment In: Public Health Nutr. 2012 Mar;15(3):483-5; discussion 48621859506
PubMed ID
21835085 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Baltic Sea Diet Score: a tool for assessing healthy eating in Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260544
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Aug;17(8):1697-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Noora Kanerva
Niina E Kaartinen
Ursula Schwab
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Satu Männistö
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Aug;17(8):1697-705
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - standards
Diet Records
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Health
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Public Health
Questionnaires
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
The health-related effects of the Nordic diet remain mostly unidentified. We created a Baltic Sea Diet Score (BSDS) for epidemiological research to indicate adherence to a healthy Nordic diet. We examined associations between the score and nutrient intakes that are considered important in promoting public health. We also examined the performance of the BSDS under two different cut-off strategies.
The cross-sectional study included two phases of the National FINRISK 2007 Study. Diet was assessed using a validated FFQ. Food and nutrient intakes were calculated using in-house software. Nine components were selected for the score. Each component was scored according to both sex-specific consumption quartiles (BSDS-Q) and medians (BSDS-M), and summed to give the final score values.
A large representative sample of the Finnish population.
Men (n 2217) and women (n 2493) aged 25 to 74 years.
In the age- and energy-adjusted model, adherence to the diet was associated with a higher intake of carbohydrates (E%), and lower intakes of SFA (E%) and alcohol (E%, where E% is percentage of total energy intake; P
PubMed ID
24172174 View in PubMed
Less detail

The combined use of cholesterol-lowering drugs and cholesterol-lowering bread spreads: health behavior data from Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178019
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Nov;39(5):849-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Nynke de Jong
Meri Simojoki
Tiina Laatikainen
Heli Tapanainen
Liisa Valsta
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Antti Uutela
Erkki Vartiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. nynke.de.jong@rivm.nl
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Nov;39(5):849-55
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Anticholesteremic Agents - administration & dosage
Bread
Cholesterol - blood
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Hypercholesterolemia - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Margarine - utilization
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Cholesterol-lowering drugs may metabolically interact with cholesterol-lowering bread spreads. This study analyses the prevalence of use of drugs, bread spreads or the combination of both in people aware of their high/elevated cholesterol level, and compares users of the three therapies on health behavior and demographics.
Participants (9581, 25-74 years) from The National FINRISK 2002 Study filled out a questionnaire on demographics and health (related) issues. Blood samples, blood pressure, body weight and height were measured.
Of those who reported to have a high cholesterol level (31% of the study population), 19% used cholesterol-lowering drugs, 11% used cholesterol-lowering bread spreads and 5% combined both therapies. On a population level, only 1% jointly used a drug and bread spread therapy. The combination was used by especially highly educated people and those having a healthy diet.
Combining a cholesterol-lowering drug with a bread spread regimen is relatively rare, even among those being aware of their high cholesterol levels. The combined usage was most frequent among 'the better off'. Public health risks of a metabolic interaction between both therapies may not be of major importance yet, but future follow-up is recommended.
PubMed ID
15475015 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary and lifestyle characteristics associated with normal-weight obesity: the National FINRISK 2007 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106164
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Mar 14;111(5):887-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2014
Author
Satu Männistö
Kennet Harald
Jukka Kontto
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Niina E Kaartinen
Suoma E Saarni
Noora Kanerva
Pekka Jousilahti
Author Affiliation
Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, 00271, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2014 Mar 14;111(5):887-94
Date
Mar-14-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - pathology
Adiposity
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Surveys
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sedentary lifestyle
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the lifestyle (leisure-time physical activity, smoking habits and alcohol consumption) and dietary (energy-yielding nutrients, dietary fibre and foods) factors of Finns with a new syndrome called normal-weight obesity (NWO) with those of lean and overweight Finns. The representative population-based study included 4786 participants (25-74 years) from the National FINRISK 2007 Study with a health examination and questionnaires. Food intake was assessed using a validated FFQ. NWO was defined to include those with a normal BMI (
PubMed ID
24229475 View in PubMed
Less detail

Do childhood social circumstances affect overweight and obesity in early adulthood?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153186
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):206-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Laura Kestilä
Ossi Rahkonen
Tuija Martelin
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Seppo Koskinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Functional Capacity, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland. laura.kestila@ktl.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2009 Mar;37(2):206-19
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Overweight - epidemiology - etiology
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to examine the association of childhood circumstances with overweight and obesity in early adulthood, to analyse whether the respondent's education and current circumstances mediate these associations, and to explore whether the respondent's health behaviour affects these associations.
This was a cross-sectional study with retrospective inquiries.
The study was based on a representative two-stage cluster sample (N= 1894, participation rate 79%) of young adults aged 18-29 years in Finland in 2000. The outcome measure was three-class body mass index (BMI) (normal weight, overweight, and obesity). Multinomial logistic regression was used as the main statistical tool.
In women, childhood circumstances (low parental education (relative risk ratio (RRR) = 2.43), parental unemployment (RRR= 2.09) and single-parent family (RRR= 1.99)) increased the risk of overweight (25 or = 30) in women in the age-adjusted models, and being bullied at school remained a significant predictor after adjusting for all childhood and current determinants. In both genders, the strong association between parental education and obesity remained significant after adjusting for all other determinants (for the lowest educational category, RRR= 3.56 in women, and RRR= 6.55 in men).
Childhood factors predict overweight and obesity in early adulthood. This effect is stronger on obesity than on overweight and in women than in men, and it seems to be partly mediated by adult circumstances. The results emphasize the lasting effect of childhood socioeconomic position on adult obesity. When preventive policies are being planned, social circumstances in childhood should be addressed.
PubMed ID
19141544 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of a healthy food supply intervention in a military setting: positive changes in cereal, fat and sugar containing foods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122098
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012;9:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Clarissa M L Bingham
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Pauli Puukka
Marja Kinnunen
Piia Jallinoja
Pilvikki Absetz
Author Affiliation
Health Behavior and Health Promotion Unit, Department of Lifestyle and Participation, National Institute for Health and Welfare, FI-00271, Helsinki, Finland. clarissa.bingham@thl.fi
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012;9:91
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cereals
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Feeding Behavior - psychology
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits - psychology
Food Services - standards
Food Supply - standards - statistics & numerical data
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Military Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Young Adult
Abstract
In Finland, all men are liable to military service and a clear majority completes service. The increasing prevalence of obesity also among soldiers concerns conscripts' food choices. Conscripts are served nutritionally planned regular main meals but individual choices take place in free-time eating. This study assesses the effects in conscripts' eating habits in an intervention targeting the supply of healthy foods available in the military setting.
Participants were 604 18-21-year old male conscripts of whom 242 belonged to Control Group and 362 to Intervention Group. Participants of Control Group were historical controls performing military service one year before Intervention Group. The intervention targeted selection, placement, and attractiveness of healthy foods in garrison refectories and soldier's home cafeterias, the two main food providers in the military. Dietary intake data was collected by self-administered questionnaire at three time points: before/beginning of military service (T0), 8 weeks (T1) and 6 months (T2) of military service. Outcome measures were food consumption frequencies and four dietary indexes (Cereal Index, Fruit and Vegetable Index, Fat Index and Sugar Index) developed to characterize the diet. Changes between study groups in outcome variables and in time were analysed by repeated-measures analysis of covariance.
Significant (p?
Notes
Cites: Mil Med. 2001 Feb;166(2):184-9011272719
Cites: Mil Med. 2007 Nov;172(11):1160-518062389
Cites: J Nutr Health Aging. 2001;5(3):150-411458284
Cites: Mil Med. 2003 Jul;168(7):556-6012901467
Cites: Stat Med. 2004 Mar 15;23(5):701-914981670
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1986 Nov;124(5):826-353766514
Cites: Mil Med. 1995 Jul;160(7):326-307659236
Cites: J Am Diet Assoc. 1995 Nov;95(11):1268-737594122
Cites: Mil Med. 1996 Feb;161(2):84-88857219
Cites: Mil Med. 1997 May;162(5):328-329155102
Cites: Obes Res. 1999 Jan;7(1):60-710023731
Cites: Mil Med. 1999 Jun;164(6):389-9510377705
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2008 Feb;34(2):119-2618201641
Cites: Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2008 Jun;59(4):279-9017852479
Cites: Mil Med. 2009 Jul;174(7):678-8419685837
Cites: Obes Rev. 2009 Nov;10(6):693-919486307
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2009 Dec;12(12):2392-919323867
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6A):939-4620513264
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6A):973-920513268
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6A):980-620513269
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Jun;13(6A):993-920513271
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2009 Dec;19(6):871-818980607
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2010 Oct;13(10):1647-5220444314
Cites: Mil Med. 2011 May;176(5):507-1221634294
Cites: Obes Facts. 2011;4(3):229-3721701240
Cites: Appetite. 2011 Dec;57(3):718-2121920395
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2012 Jul;15(7):1248-5522166515
Cites: Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2005 Jan;40(1):57-6315624076
Cites: Endocrine. 2005 Feb;26(1):65-915805587
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2005 Jul;29(1):61-7015958254
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2006 Sep;59(9):994-100116895824
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006 Nov;38(11):1990-417095934
Cites: Appetite. 2007 Jan;48(1):46-5316973238
Cites: Mil Med. 2006 Nov;171(11):1089-9417153547
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Oct;30(10):2465-7017586741
Cites: Public Health Nutr. 2001 Feb;4(1A):131-911255503
PubMed ID
22849620 View in PubMed
Less detail

23 records – page 1 of 3.