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Accommodation of additional non-randomly sampled cases in a study of Helicobacter pylori infection in families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29334
Source
Stat Med. 2005 Dec 30;24(24):4045-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-30-2005
Author
Mårten Kivi
Anna L V Johansson
Agus Salim
Ylva Tindberg
Marie Reilly
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics (MEB), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Stat Med. 2005 Dec 30;24(24):4045-54
Date
Dec-30-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Epidemiologic Studies
Family
Helicobacter Infections - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - pathogenicity
Humans
Logistic Models
Patient Selection
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Epidemiological studies with two-stage designs typically gather information about some covariates from all study subjects in the first sampling stage, while additional data from only a subset of the subjects are collected in the second sampling stage. Appropriate analysis of two-stage studies maintains validity and can also improve precision. We describe an application of a weighted likelihood method, mean-score logistic regression, to accommodate data from a cross-sectional study of Helicobacter pylori infection in children, where the study sample was enriched with additional non-randomly sampled cases. The present work exemplifies how careful analysis of epidemiological data from complex sampling schemes can adjust for potential selection bias, improve precision and enable a more complete investigation of factors of interest. Our results highlight the importance of H. pylori infected mothers and siblings as risk factors for the infection in children in Sweden.
PubMed ID
16320286 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are chronic myeloid leukemia patients more at risk for second malignancies? A population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100387
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Nov 1;172(9):1028-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2010
Author
Paola Rebora
Kamila Czene
Laura Antolini
Carlo Gambacorti Passerini
Marie Reilly
Maria Grazia Valsecchi
Author Affiliation
Center of Biostatistics for Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Clinical Medicine and Prevention, University of Milano–Bicocca, Monza, Italy.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Nov 1;172(9):1028-33
Date
Nov-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Lymphoid - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Stomach Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Urogenital Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
The authors used cancer registry data to assess the incidence rate of second primary cancers among chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients and the long-term survival of CML patients before the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In the Swedish Cancer Registry, the authors identified 2,753 adult CML patients diagnosed between 1970 and 1995 who were followed through December 2007. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and relative survival ratios were computed. With a total of 145 subsequent primary malignancies, an increased incidence rate of second malignancy was found for stomach cancer (SIR = 2.76, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.33, 5.08), skin cancer (SIR = 5.36, 95% CI: 3.18, 8.47), urogenital tract cancer (SIR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.15, 2.21), and lymphoid leukemia (SIR = 5.53, 95% CI: 1.79, 12.89). Long-term relative survival figures showed that CML was related, in the era prior to the introduction of imatinib, to a very steep decline in survival (2 years from diagnosis, relative survival = 51%, 95% CI: 49, 53). This was in spite of a marginal improvement after 1985, possibly related to the introduction of interferon-a for treatment. These estimates constitute a relevant reference for future studies and a benchmark for comparisons with prognosis in CML patients after chronic use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
PubMed ID
20861143 View in PubMed
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Association of blood group and red blood cell transfusion with the incidence of antepartum, peripartum and postpartum venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308935
Source
Sci Rep. 2019 09 19; 9(1):13535
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-19-2019
Author
Chen Wang
Isabelle Le Ray
Brian Lee
Agneta Wikman
Marie Reilly
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Sci Rep. 2019 09 19; 9(1):13535
Date
09-19-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Blood Group Antigens - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Erythrocyte Transfusion - adverse effects - methods
Female
Humans
Incidence
Odds Ratio
Peripartum Period
Postpartum Period
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Thrombophilia - etiology
Venous Thromboembolism - blood - epidemiology - pathology
Venous Thrombosis - etiology
Abstract
The increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) associated with pregnancy is well-known and prophylaxis guidelines consider a number of risk factors. Although non-O blood group and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion are known to be associated with VTE risk, their contribution to pregnancy-associated VTE has received little attention. This study was conducted in a population-based cohort of 1,000,997 deliveries to women with no prior history of VTE or thrombophilia. The independent contributions of ABO blood type and RBC transfusion to the risks of antepartum, peripartum and postpartum VTE are reported as odds ratios adjusted for risk factors that are considered in current prophylaxis guidelines and other potential confounders. Compared with type O, A and B blood types have higher risk of antepartum and postpartum VTE, with odds ratios between 1.4 and 1.8. Transfusion around delivery has the largest increased risks and a dose-response effect, with adjusted odds ratios from 2.60 (1.71-3.97) for 1-2 units to 3.55 (1.32-9.55) for more than 5 units. ABO blood type and RBC transfusion were found to be independent risk factors for pregnancy-associated VTE. Further research is required to understand the underlying mechanisms and to conduct a risk-benefit assessment of the small volumes of RBCs transfused around delivery.
PubMed ID
31537816 View in PubMed
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Associations of Rhesus and non-Rhesus maternal red blood cell alloimmunization with stillbirth and preterm birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264716
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;43(4):1123-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Jing Fan
Brian K Lee
Agneta T Wikman
Stefan Johansson
Marie Reilly
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2014 Aug;43(4):1123-31
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Group Incompatibility - epidemiology - immunology
Erythrocytes - immunology
Female
Humans
Isoantibodies - immunology
Logistic Models
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - immunology
Metalloendopeptidases - immunology
Pregnancy
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Rh Isoimmunization - epidemiology - immunology
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although the risks of adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with anti-D antibodies are well-recognized, much less is known concerning alloimmunization with other red blood cell antibodies detected during routine maternal screening. To date, most reports of adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with non-anti-D antibodies have been from small case studies. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of maternal alloimmunization with specific red blood cell antibodies and the risks of preterm birth and stillbirth in the Swedish population.
All antibody screening, outcome and covariate data were obtained through linkages of Swedish national health and data registers. Follow-up in these population-based registers was available up to 31 December 2002. The final study sample consisted of 1,022,569 singleton births from 668,952 mothers during 1987-2002.
In total, 1.3% of the 1,022,569 study pregnancies were alloimmunized. In adjusted logistic regression models, compared with having no antibodies, alloimmunization with anti-D, anti-E, anti-C and anti-c was associated with increased risk of both stillbirth and preterm birth. In addition, anti-Kell was associated with increased risk of preterm birth and anti-Lea with increased risk of stillbirth. Compared with firstborn children, risk of preterm birth associated with alloimmunization was greater in subsequent births
In the largest study to date, alloimmunization with Rhesus, K- and -Lea red blood cell antibodies increased the risk of preterm birth and/or stillbirth. The association of anti-Lea with stillbirth was an unexpected finding. Further study of the consequences of non-anti-D alloimmunization is warranted.
Notes
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Cites: Transfusion. 2007 May;47(5):911-717465958
PubMed ID
24801308 View in PubMed
Less detail

Combining data from 2 nested case-control studies of overlapping cohorts to improve efficiency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156752
Source
Biostatistics. 2009 Jan;10(1):70-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Agus Salim
Christina Hultman
Pär Sparén
Marie Reilly
Author Affiliation
Department of Community, Occupational and Family Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore.
Source
Biostatistics. 2009 Jan;10(1):70-9
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anorexia Nervosa - epidemiology - etiology
Biometry - methods
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Data Collection - methods
Female
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Meta-Analysis as Topic
Proportional Hazards Models
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Sample Size
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Abstract
Researchers subject to time and budget constraints may conduct small nested case-control studies with individually matched controls to help optimize statistical power. In this paper, we show how precision can be improved considerably by combining data from a small nested case-control study with data from a larger nested case-control study of a different outcome in the same or overlapping cohort. Our approach is based on the inverse probability weighting concept, in which the log-likelihood contribution of each individual observation is weighted by the inverse of its probability of inclusion in either study. We illustrate our approach using simulated data and an application where we combine data sets from 2 nested case-control studies to investigate risk factors for anorexia nervosa in a cohort of young women in Sweden.
PubMed ID
18550564 View in PubMed
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A constant risk for familial breast cancer? A population-based family study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150850
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2009;11(3):R30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Kamila Czene
Marie Reilly
Per Hall
Mikael Hartman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. kamila.czene@ki.se
Source
Breast Cancer Res. 2009;11(3):R30
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Cohort Studies
Family Health
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Mothers
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
The incidence of breast cancer in the unaffected breast of women with previous breast malignancy remains constant after the first diagnosis. We investigated whether there is a similar pattern in the breast cancer incidence in first-degree relatives of breast cancer patients. We studied the risk for breast cancer in mothers at ages older than their daughter's age at diagnosis.
We analyzed a Swedish population-based cohort with complete family links and calculated incidence rates of breast cancer in mothers of 48,259 daughters diagnosed with breast cancer.
The risk for breast cancer in mothers of breast cancer patients is elevated relative to the background population at all ages. Mothers have an overall incidence of 0.34%/year at ages older than a daughter's age at diagnosis. This rate is not affected to any large extent by the daughter's age at diagnosis. A constant incidence rate of 0.40%/year from age 35 years onward is seen in mothers of breast cancer patients diagnosed before 35 years of age. For mothers of daughters diagnosed at age 35 to 44 years the incidence pattern is less clear, with the rate being stable for approximately 20 years after the daughter's age at diagnosis and rising thereafter. Older age at a daughter's diagnosis (> or = 45 years) appears to confer an age-dependent increase in incidence in the mother.
Incidence of familial breast cancer in first-degree relatives may increase to a high and constant level by a predetermined age that is specific to each family. This phenomenon appears inconsistent with accepted theories of malignant transformation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19457262 View in PubMed
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Constructing a population-based research database from routine maternal screening records: a resource for studying alloimmunization in pregnant women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129128
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(11):e27619
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Brian K Lee
Alexander Ploner
Zhongxing Zhang
Gunilla Gryfelt
Agneta Wikman
Marie Reilly
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Drexel University School of Public Health, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
Source
PLoS One. 2011;6(11):e27619
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Erythrocytes - immunology
Female
Geography
Health Resources - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Isoantibodies - immunology
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Medical Records - statistics & numerical data
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Parturition
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Rh Isoimmunization - epidemiology - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Although screening for maternal red blood cell antibodies during pregnancy is a standard procedure, the prevalence and clinical consequences of non-anti-D immunization are poorly understood. The objective was to create a national database of maternal antibody screening results that can be linked with population health registers to create a research resource for investigating these issues.
Each birth in the Swedish Medical Birth Register was uniquely identified and linked to the text stored in routine maternal antibody screening records in the time window from 9 months prior to 2 weeks after the delivery date. These text records were subjected to a computerized search for specific antibodies using regular expressions. To illustrate the research potential of the resulting database, selected antibody prevalence rates are presented as tables and figures, and the complete data (from more than 60 specific antibodies) presented as online moving graphical displays.
More than one million (1,191,761) births with valid screening information from 1982-2002 constitute the study population. Computerized coverage of screening increased steadily over time and varied by region as electronic records were adopted. To ensure data quality, we restricted analysis to birth records in areas and years with a sustained coverage of at least 80%, representing 920,903 births from 572,626 mothers in 17 of the 24 counties in Sweden. During the study period, non-anti-D and anti-D antibodies occurred in 76.8/10,000 and 14.1/10,000 pregnancies respectively, with marked differences between specific antibodies over time.
This work demonstrates the feasibility of creating a nationally representative research database from the routine maternal antibody screening records from an extended calendar period. By linkage with population registers of maternal and child health, such data are a valuable resource for addressing important clinical questions, such as the etiological significance of non-anti-D antibodies.
Notes
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Cites: Vox Sang. 2006 Nov;91(4):316-2317105607
PubMed ID
22140452 View in PubMed
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Controlled withdrawal of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drugs in elderly patients in nursing homes with no indication of depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45868
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Dec;59(10):735-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Johanna Ulfvarson
Johanna Adami
Regina Wredling
Bengt Kjellman
Marie Reilly
Christer von Bahr
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Pharmacology, Stockholm South General Hospital, 11883, Stockholm, Sweden. Johanna.Ulfvarson@sos.sll.se
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2003 Dec;59(10):735-40
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy
Drug Administration Schedule
Female
Humans
Male
Nursing Homes
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the investigation was to study the effects of withdrawing selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) drugs in nursing home patients, who had no documented diagnosis or symptoms of depression. SETTING: The setting of the study was in 11 nursing homes in the county of Stockholm, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Participants were patients without dementia or history of depression who had received treatment with SSRI drugs for more than 6 months and who had no indications of anxiety disorder or major depression DESIGN: The included patients ( n=70) were randomized to either the intervention group (withdrawal of SSRI) or the control group (no change in treatment), 35 patients to each group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The patients were subjected to assessment using the following instruments: Montgomery-Asberg depression rating scale, global assessment for functioning, health index and a symptom assessment form. Assessment was made at the start of the study and at the 3-month and 6-month follow-ups. RESULTS: We found no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in any outcome measure. CONCLUSION: Treatment with SSRI drugs in patients without clinical major depression or anxiety disorder is often unjustified and should be discontinued.
Notes
Comment In: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2005 Jun;61(4):321-3; author reply 325-615918058
PubMed ID
14595527 View in PubMed
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Differences in survival for patients with familial and sporadic cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282261
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Feb 01;140(3):581-590
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-01-2017
Author
Myeongjee Lee
Marie Reilly
Linda Sofie Lindström
Kamila Czene
Source
Int J Cancer. 2017 Feb 01;140(3):581-590
Date
Feb-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mothers
Neoplasms - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Siblings
Sweden
Abstract
Family history of cancer is a well-known risk factor but the role of family history in survival is less clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between family history and cancer survival for the common cancers in Sweden. Using the Swedish population-based registers, patients diagnosed with the most common cancers were followed for cancer-specific death during 1991-2010. We used multivariate proportional hazards (Cox) regression models to contrast the survival of patients with a family history of cancer (individuals whose parent or sibling had a concordant cancer) to the survival of patients without a family history. Family history of cancer had a modest protective effect on survival for breast cancer (hazard ratio (HR)?=?0.88, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)?=?0.81 to 0.96) and prostate cancer (HR?=?0.82, 95% CI?=?0.75 to 0.90). In contrast, family history of cancer was associated with worse survival for nervous system cancers (HR?=?1.24, 95% CI?=?1.05 to 1.47) and ovarian cancer (HR?=?1.20, 95% CI?=?1.01 to 1.43). Furthermore, the poorer survival for ovarian cancer was consistent with a higher FIGO stage and a greater proportion of more aggressive tumors of the serous type. The better survival for patients with a family history of breast and prostate cancer may be due to medical surveillance of family members. The poor survival for ovarian cancer patients with an affected mother or sister is multifactorial, suggesting that these cancers are more aggressive than their sporadic counterparts.
PubMed ID
27759937 View in PubMed
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Duration of red blood cell storage and survival of transfused patients (CME).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145388
Source
Transfusion. 2010 Jun;50(6):1185-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Gustaf Edgren
Mads Kamper-Jørgensen
Sandra Eloranta
Klaus Rostgaard
Brian Custer
Henrik Ullum
Edward L Murphy
Michael P Busch
Marie Reilly
Mads Melbye
Henrik Hjalgrim
Olof Nyrén
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. gustaf.edgren@ki.se
Source
Transfusion. 2010 Jun;50(6):1185-95
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Preservation - adverse effects
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Erythrocyte Transfusion - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Disquieting reports of increased complication and death rates after transfusions of red blood cells (RBCs) stored for more than 14 days prompted us to perform an observational retrospective cohort study of mortality in relation to storage time.
We conducted a cohort study utilizing data on all recipients of at least one RBC transfusion in Sweden and Denmark between 1995 and 2002, as recorded in the Scandinavian Donations and Transfusions (SCANDAT) database. Relative risks of death in relation to storage time were estimated using Cox regression, adjusted for several possible confounding factors.
After various exclusions, 404,959 transfusion episodes remained for analysis. The 7-day risk of death was similar in all exposure groups, but a tendency for a higher risk emerged among recipients of blood stored for 30 to 42 days (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-1.12), compared to recipients of blood stored for 10 to 19 days. With 2-year follow-up, this excess remained at the same level (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02-1.08). No dose-response pattern was revealed and no differential effect was seen when the analyses were restricted to recipients of leukoreduced units only.
Although a small excess mortality was noted in recipients of the oldest RBCs, the risk pattern was more consistent with weak confounding than with an effect of the momentary exposure to stored RBCs. It seems, thus, that any excess mortality conferred by older RBCs in the combined Swedish and Danish transfusion recipient population is likely less than 5%, which is considerably smaller than in the hitherto largest investigation.
Notes
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Erratum In: Transfusion. 2010 Aug;50(8):1857
PubMed ID
20158690 View in PubMed
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