Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

Ambient air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence in four European cohorts within the ESCAPE project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282438
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Marie Pedersen
Zorana J Andersen
Massimo Stafoggia
Gudrun Weinmayr
Claudia Galassi
Mette Sørensen
Kirsten T Eriksen
Anne Tjønneland
Steffen Loft
Andrea Jaensch
Gabriele Nagel
Hans Concin
Ming-Yi Tsai
Sara Grioni
Alessandro Marcon
Vittorio Krogh
Fulvio Ricceri
Carlotta Sacerdote
Andrea Ranzi
Ranjeet Sokhi
Roel Vermeulen
Kees de Hoogh
Meng Wang
Rob Beelen
Paolo Vineis
Bert Brunekreef
Gerard Hoek
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Austria - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Italy - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Nitrogen Oxides - adverse effects - analysis
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Tobacco smoke exposure increases the risk of cancer in the liver, but little is known about the possible risk associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
We evaluated the association between residential exposure to air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence.
We obtained data from four cohorts with enrolment during 1985-2005 in Denmark, Austria and Italy. Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOX), particulate matter (PM) with diameter of less than 10µm (PM10), less than 2.5µm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10µm (PM2.5-10) and PM2.5 absorbance (soot) at baseline home addresses were estimated using land-use regression models from the ESCAPE project. We also investigated traffic density on the nearest road. We used Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and random-effects meta-analyses to estimate summary hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Out of 174,770 included participants, 279 liver cancer cases were diagnosed during a mean follow-up of 17 years. In each cohort, HRs above one were observed for all exposures with exception of PM2.5 absorbance and traffic density. In the meta-analysis, all exposures were associated with elevated HRs, but none of the associations reached statistical significance. The summary HR associated with a 10-µg/m(3) increase in NO2 was 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.30) and 1.34 (95% CI: 0.76, 2.35) for a 5-µg/m(3) increase in PM2.5.
The results provide suggestive evidence that ambient air pollution may increase the risk of liver cancer. Confidence intervals for associations with NO2 and NOX were narrower than for the other exposures.
PubMed ID
28107740 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of hemoglobin adducts from acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide in paired mother/cord blood samples from Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131736
Source
Chem Res Toxicol. 2011 Nov 21;24(11):1957-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2011
Author
Hans von Stedingk
Anna C Vikström
Per Rydberg
Marie Pedersen
Jeanette K S Nielsen
Dan Segerbäck
Lisbeth E Knudsen
Margareta Törnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Chemistry Unit, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Chem Res Toxicol. 2011 Nov 21;24(11):1957-65
Date
Nov-21-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - blood
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Chromatography, Liquid
Denmark
Epoxy Compounds - blood
Ethylene Oxide - blood
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Fetus
Hemoglobins - metabolism
Humans
Mass Spectrometry
Maternal Exposure
Placenta - physiology
Pregnancy
Smoking - adverse effects - blood
Abstract
The knowledge about fetal exposure to acrylamide/glycidamide from the maternal exposure through food is limited. Acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide are electrophiles and form adducts with hemoglobin (Hb), which could be used for in vivo dose measurement. In this study, a method for analysis of Hb adducts by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, the adduct FIRE procedure, was applied to measurements of adducts from these compounds in maternal blood samples (n = 87) and umbilical cord blood samples (n = 219). The adduct levels from the three compounds, acrylamide, glycidamide, and ethylene oxide, were increased in tobacco smokers. Highly significant correlations were found between cord and maternal blood with regard to measured adduct levels of the three compounds. The mean cord/maternal hemoglobin adduct level ratios were 0.48 (range 0.27-0.86) for acrylamide, 0.38 (range 0.20-0.73) for glycidamide, and 0.43 (range 0.17-1.34) for ethylene oxide. In vitro studies with acrylamide and glycidamide showed a lower (0.38-0.48) rate of adduct formation with Hb in cord blood than with Hb in maternal blood, which is compatible with the structural differences in fetal and adult Hb. Together, these results indicate a similar life span of fetal and maternal erythrocytes. The results showed that the in vivo dose in fetal and maternal blood is about the same and that the placenta gives negligible protection of the fetus to exposure from the investigated compounds. A trend of higher levels of the measured adducts in cord blood with gestational age was observed, which may reflect the gestational age-related change of the cord blood Hb composition toward a higher content of adult Hb. The results suggest that the Hb adduct levels measured in cord blood reflect the exposure to the fetus during the third trimester. The evaluation of the new analytical method showed that it is suitable for monitoring of background exposures of the investigated electrophilic compounds in large population studies.
PubMed ID
21882862 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antibiotics in pregnancy increase children's risk of otitis media and ventilation tubes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283543
Source
J Pediatr. 2017 Apr;183:153-158.e1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Tine Marie Pedersen
Jakob Stokholm
Jonathan Thorsen
Anna-Rosa Cecilie Mora-Jensen
Hans Bisgaard
Source
J Pediatr. 2017 Apr;183:153-158.e1
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Denmark
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Middle Ear Ventilation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious - drug therapy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Prognosis
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Abstract
To study the association between antibiotic intake in pregnancy and the development of otitis media and placement of ventilation tubes (VTs) in the offspring under the hypothesis that antibiotics in pregnancy may alter the offspring's propensity for disease.
Data from the 700 children in the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood 2010 unselected birth cohort study were used. Information on maternal antibiotic use and other exposures during pregnancy was collected prospectively from interviews and validated in national registries. Otitis media episodes were registered in a prospective diary for 3 years. Information regarding children's VTs was obtained from national registries.
There were 514 children who had diary information and were included in the analysis regarding otitis media episodes. For VTs analysis, 699 children were included. Thirty-seven percent of the mothers received antibiotics during pregnancy, and this was associated with increased risk of otitis media (adjusted hazard ratio 1.30; 95% CI 1.04-1.63; P?=?.02). The risk of receiving VTs was especially associated with third trimester antibiotics (adjusted hazard ratio 1.60; 95% CI 1.08-2.36, P?=?.02). The risk of otitis media increased with increasing number of treatments (per-level adjusted hazard ratio 1.20; 95% CI 1.04-1.40; P?=?.02), but for VTs this association was not significant after adjustment.
Maternal use of antibiotics during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of otitis media and VT insertions in the offspring. Antibiotics late in pregnancy mainly contributed to these effects, pointing toward potential transmission of an unfavorable microbiome from mother to child.
PubMed ID
28088397 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birthweight and Childhood Cancer: Preliminary Findings from the International Childhood Cancer Cohort Consortium (I4C).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273002
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2015 Jul;29(4):335-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2015
Author
Ora Paltiel
Gabriella Tikellis
Martha Linet
Jean Golding
Stanley Lemeshow
Gary Phillips
Karen Lamb
Camilla Stoltenberg
Siri E Håberg
Marin Strøm
Charlotta Granstrøm
Kate Northstone
Mark Klebanoff
Anne-Louise Ponsonby
Elizabeth Milne
Marie Pedersen
Manolis Kogevinas
Eunhee Ha
Terence Dwyer
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2015 Jul;29(4):335-45
Date
Jul-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Australia - epidemiology
Birth weight
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Great Britain - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Israel - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Evidence relating childhood cancer to high birthweight is derived primarily from registry and case-control studies. We aimed to investigate this association, exploring the potential modifying roles of age at diagnosis and maternal anthropometrics, using prospectively collected data from the International Childhood Cancer Cohort Consortium.
We pooled data on infant and parental characteristics and cancer incidence from six geographically and temporally diverse member cohorts [the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (UK), the Collaborative Perinatal Project (USA), the Danish National Birth Cohort (Denmark), the Jerusalem Perinatal Study (Israel), the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (Norway), and the Tasmanian Infant Health Survey (Australia)]. Birthweight metrics included a continuous measure, deciles, and categories (= 4.0 vs.
Notes
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2012 Sep;23(9):1577-8522878902
Cites: Circulation. 2012 Mar 20;125(11):1381-922344037
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2013 Apr;49(6):1437-4723266048
Cites: Pediatrics. 2013 Nov;132(5):e1265-7524167169
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2013 Dec 15;133(12):2968-7923754574
Cites: Mol Genet Metab. 2012 Sep;107(1-2):25-3022867885
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2015 Feb;44(1):153-6825626438
Cites: PLoS One. 2013;8(8):e7054923936446
Cites: Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 Oct;185(4):845-911641663
Cites: Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2002 Jan;86(1):F2-311815536
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2004 Jun 20;110(3):465-715095317
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2004 Oct 20;96(20):1549-5615494605
Cites: Acta Paediatr Scand. 1966;:Suppl 167:1+5940749
Cites: Cancer. 1969 Apr;23(4):913-95775981
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1984 May;119(5):788-956720675
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 1987 Mar;62(3):279-873646026
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 1994 Mar;83(3):342-528127523
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Jul 2;89(13):939-479214673
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1962 Jan;28:231-4414468028
Cites: Br J Cancer. 2006 Jun 5;94(11):1738-4416736025
Cites: Pediatr Int. 2006 Oct;48(5):470-816970785
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2007 Aug;18(6):655-6317503007
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Jul 15;166(2):151-917443021
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:16817650297
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Aug;36(4):724-3017255350
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Jun;87(6):1750-918541565
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2009 Jun 1;124(11):2658-7019173295
Cites: Epidemiology. 2009 Jul;20(4):484-719525684
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2009 Aug 1;170(3):379-8719498073
Cites: Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2010 Feb;54(2):242-919813253
Cites: Curr Opin Obstet Gynecol. 2009 Dec;21(6):521-619809317
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 Apr;19(4):1042-5220332267
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 2010 Jul;169(7):875-8120101509
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2010 Sep;24(5):449-6920670226
Cites: Stat Med. 2011 Feb 20;30(4):377-9921225900
Cites: Leuk Lymphoma. 2011 Apr;52(4):709-1221438834
Erratum In: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2015 Nov;29(6):58926443988
PubMed ID
25989709 View in PubMed
Less detail

Incidence and Determinants of Ventilation Tubes in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283667
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0165657
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Tine Marie Pedersen
Anna-Rosa Cecilie Mora-Jensen
Johannes Waage
Hans Bisgaard
Jakob Stokholm
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0165657
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Otitis Media with Effusion - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Respiration, Artificial - adverse effects - instrumentation
Abstract
Many children are treated for recurrent acute otitis media and middle ear effusion with ventilation tubes (VT). The objectives are to describe the incidence of VT in Denmark during 1997-2011 from national register data, furthermore, to analyze the determinants for VT in the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood2010 (COPSAC2010) birth cohort.
The incidence of VT in all children under 16 years from 1997-2011 were calculated in the Danish national registries. Determinants of VT were studied in the COPSAC2010 birth cohort of 700 children.
Nationwide the prevalence of VT was 24% in children aged 0 to 3 three years, with a significant increase over the study period. For all children 0-15 years, the incidence of VT was 35/1,000. In the VT population, 57% was male and 43% females. In the COPSAC2010 birth cohort, the prevalence of VT during the first 3 years of life was 29%. Determinants of VT were: maternal history of middle ear disease; aHR 2.07, 95% CI [1.45-2.96] and siblings history of middle ear disease; aHR 3.02, [2.11-4.32]. Paternal history of middle ear disease, presence of older siblings in the home and diagnosis of persistent wheeze were significant in the univariate analysis but the association did not persist after adjustment.
The incidence of VT is still increasing in the youngest age group in Denmark, demonstrating the highest incidence recorded in the world. Family history of middle ear disease and older siblings are the main determinants for VT.
Notes
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008 Oct 08;(4):CD00474118843668
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 May 11;354(19):1998-200516687712
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2000 Feb;90(2):245-5010667186
Cites: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2013 Jul;149(1 Suppl):S1-3523818543
Cites: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2016 Feb;154(1 Suppl):S1-S4126832942
Cites: Vaccine. 2015 Sep 22;33(39):5072-926297875
Cites: J Speech Lang Hear Res. 2010 Feb;53(1):34-4319635942
Cites: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2004 Apr;25(2):110-2215083134
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Feb 7;363(9407):465-7314962529
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1989 Jul;160(1):83-942732519
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Jul;39(7 Suppl):34-721775348
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 1999 Jun;46(3):263-810421985
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 Jan;121(1):e24-3318166541
Cites: Otolaryngol Clin North Am. 1991 Aug;24(4):757-611870869
Cites: Otol Neurotol. 2005 Sep;26(5):1016-2116151352
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2010 Oct 06;(10):CD00180120927726
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(10):e4821523133572
Cites: Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 1999 Apr 24;143(17):902-510347666
Cites: Pediatrics. 2003 Aug;112(2):265-7712897272
Cites: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Sep;145(3):383-9521632976
Cites: Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2001 Apr;124(4):374-8011283489
Cites: Fam Pract. 2014 Feb;31(1):30-724243868
Cites: Am J Hum Genet. 2007 Sep;81(3):559-7517701901
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Oct 15;188(8):1041-224127810
Cites: Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2008 Aug;72(8):1207-1318550182
Cites: Anesth Analg. 2011 Jun;112(6):1440-721543787
Cites: J Assoc Res Otolaryngol. 2013 Dec;14(6):791-80023974705
Cites: Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2012 Aug;76(8):1117-2222648089
Cites: J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2008 Apr;18(4):226-918474156
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Nov 7;286(17):2128-3511694154
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Aug 11;353(6):576-8616093466
Cites: Clin Exp Allergy. 2013 Dec;43(12):1384-9424118234
Cites: Dan Med Bull. 2006 Nov;53(4):441-917150149
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007 Jan 24;(1):CD00416317253499
Cites: BMJ. 2001 Nov 10;323(7321):1096-711701573
Cites: PLoS One. 2014 Jan 23;9(1):e8639724466073
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jan 18;356(3):248-6117229952
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2005 Sep;23(3):184-9116162472
Cites: Vital Health Stat 13. 1998 Nov;(139):1-1199866429
PubMed ID
27875554 View in PubMed
Less detail

Maternal diet, prenatal exposure to dioxin-like compounds and birth outcomes in a European prospective mother-child study (NewGeneris).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266778
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jun 15;484:121-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-2014
Author
Eleni Papadopoulou
Manolis Kogevinas
Maria Botsivali
Marie Pedersen
Harrie Besselink
Michelle A Mendez
Sarah Fleming
Laura J Hardie
Lisbeth E Knudsen
John Wright
Silvia Agramunt
Jordi Sunyer
Berit Granum
Kristine B Gutzkow
Gunnar Brunborg
Jan Alexander
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Katerina Sarri
Leda Chatzi
Domenico F Merlo
Jos C Kleinjans
Margaretha Haugen
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Jun 15;484:121-8
Date
Jun-15-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dioxins - blood
Environmental Policy
Environmental pollutants - blood
Female
Gestational Age
Great Britain - epidemiology
Greece - epidemiology
Health Policy
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Mothers
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology
Spain - epidemiology
Abstract
Maternal diet can result in exposure to environmental contaminants including dioxins which may influence foetal growth. We investigated the association between maternal diet and birth outcomes by defining a dioxin-rich diet. We used validated food frequency questionnaires to assess the diet of pregnant women from Greece, Spain, United Kingdom, Denmark and Norway and estimated plasma dioxin-like activity by the Dioxin-Responsive Chemically Activated LUciferase eXpression (DR-CALUX®) bioassay in 604 maternal blood samples collected at delivery. We applied reduced rank regression to identify a dioxin-rich dietary pattern based on dioxin-like activity (DR-CALUX®) levels in maternal plasma, and calculated a dioxin-diet score as an estimate of adherence to this dietary pattern. In the five country population, dioxin-diet score was characterised by high consumption of red and white meat, lean and fatty fish, low-fat dairy and low consumption of salty snacks and high-fat cheese, during pregnancy. The upper tertile of the dioxin-diet score was associated with a change in birth weight of -121g (95% confidence intervals: -232, -10g) compared to the lower tertile after adjustment for confounders. A small non-significant reduction in gestational age was also observed (-1.4days, 95% CI: -3.8, 1.0days). Our results suggest that maternal diet might contribute to the exposure of the foetus to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds and may be related to reduced birth weight. More studies are needed to develop updated dietary guidelines for women of reproductive age, aiming to the reduction of dietary exposure to persistent organic pollutants as dioxins and dioxin-like compounds.
PubMed ID
24691212 View in PubMed
Less detail

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the indoor environment and associations with prenatal exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142321
Source
Environ Int. 2011 Jan;37(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Katrin Vorkamp
Marianne Thomsen
Marie Frederiksen
Marie Pedersen
Lisbeth E Knudsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Chemistry and Microbiology, National Environmental Research Institute (NERI), Aarhus University, Roskilde, Denmark. kvo@dmu.dk
Source
Environ Int. 2011 Jan;37(1):1-10
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - metabolism
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Dust - analysis
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Female
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - analysis - metabolism
Humans
Placenta - metabolism
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Abstract
As part of a larger exposure study, samples of dust and indoor air were collected in the homes of 43 pregnant women living in the Copenhagen area (Denmark) and analysed for 12 polybrominated diphenyl ethers using GC-MS. A second dust sample collected after delivery was analysed for BDE-183 and BDE-209, which were highly correlated with the pre-delivery samples, but did not reproduce the actual values. Concentrations as high as 80 µg/g were measured for the dominant BDE congener BDE-209, with median concentrations of 332 and 432 ng/g, respectively, in pre- and post-delivery dust samples. In 12% of the dust samples, the concentration of BDE-209 was lower than that of the summed concentration of PentaBDE congeners. The median concentrations of BDE-47 and BDE-99 in dust were 16.9 and 13.6 ng/g, respectively. The dust concentrations were in line with other European studies and confirmed previously established geographical differences between continental Europe and North America. Additional octa- and nonaBDE congeners (BDE-197, BDE-203, BDE-206, BDE-207, and BDE-208) were analysed in dust and analytical issues were discussed as these congeners also can be a product of thermal degradation of BDE-209 in gas chromatographic analysis. BDE-206 was the dominating nonaBDE, with median and maximum concentrations of 12.8 and 2217 ng/g, respectively, but the ratio of nonaBDEs to the sum of nona- and decaBDEs was relatively constant, despite a large range in absolute dust concentrations. While the congeners of the PentaBDE mixture were highly inter-correlated for both dust and air, no correlation was found with BDE-209 in either matrix. Air concentrations were relatively high in an international context, with median concentrations of 134, 63.7 and 119 pg/m³ for BDE-47, BDE-99 and BDE-209, respectively, and not correlated with dust concentrations. Additional placenta data were available for the study group and found to correlate significantly with dust concentrations for some PentaBDE congeners, but not BDE-209, indicating that dust may be an important exposure pathway for PentaBDE congeners. While BDE-209 also was present in placenta, it did not exceed the other congeners by the same factors as in dust. This might be caused by a combination of the compound's physical-chemical properties affecting bioavailability, uptake, partitioning and metabolisation, and other sources of exposure, but was not investigated further in this study. For all matrices, the PBDE profile resembled that of the technical product Bromkal 70-5DE, but air contained higher percentages of the lower brominated congeners and placenta tissue was dominated by BDE-153. The predominance of BDE-153 has been described in other studies on human samples and related to the highest retention in the body, but further research into toxicokinetics will be required to clarify mechanisms.
PubMed ID
20609475 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.