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Active School Transportation in Winter Conditions: Biking Together is Warmer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300151
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 01 15; 16(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-15-2019
Author
Anna-Karin Lindqvist
Marie Löf
Anna Ek
Stina Rutberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, 971 87 Luleå, Sweden. annlin@ltu.se.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2019 01 15; 16(2):
Date
01-15-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bicycling
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parents
Power (Psychology)
Schools
Seasons
Students
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Transportation - methods
Abstract
There has been a decline in children's use of active school transportation (AST) while there is also limited research concerning AST in winter conditions. This study aimed to explore the prerequisites and experiences of schoolchildren and parents participating in an empowerment- and gamification-inspired intervention to promote students' AST in winter conditions. Methods: Thirty-five students, who were aged 12?13 years, and 34 parents from the north of Sweden participated in the study. Data were collected using photovoice and open questions in a questionnaire and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The results show that involvement and togetherness motivated the students to use AST. In addition, during the project, the parents changed to have more positive attitudes towards their children's use of AST. The students reported that using AST during wintertime is strenuous but rewarding and imparts a sense of pride. Conclusion: Interventions for increasing students' AST in winter conditions should focus on the motivational aspects for both children and parents. For overcoming parental hesitation with regards to AST during winter, addressing their concerns and empowering the students are key factors. To increase the use of AST all year around, targeting the challenges perceived during the winter is especially beneficial.
PubMed ID
30650653 View in PubMed
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Activity pattern and energy expenditure due to physical activity before and during pregnancy in healthy Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63107
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Marie Lof
Elisabet Forsum
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, University of Linkoping, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Feb;95(2):296-302
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Energy Metabolism - physiology
Exertion - physiology
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Pregnancy - physiology
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Running - physiology
Sleep - physiology
Sweden
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Human pregnancy is associated with increased requirements for dietary energy and this increase may be partly offset by reductions in physical activity during gestation. Studies in well-nourished women have shown that the physical activity level (PAL), obtained as the total energy expenditure (TEE) divided by the BMR, decreases in late pregnancy. However, it is not known if this decrease is really caused by reductions in physical activity or if it is the result of decreases in energy expenditure/BMR (the so-called metabolic equivalent, MET) for many activities in late pregnancy. In the present study activity pattern, TEE and BMR were assessed in twenty-three healthy Swedish women before pregnancy as well as in gestational weeks 14 and 32. Activity pattern was assessed using a questionnaire and heart rate recording. TEE was assessed using the doubly labelled water method and BMR was measured by means of indirect calorimetry. When compared to the pre-pregnant value, there was little change in the PAL in gestational week 14 but it was significantly reduced in gestational week 32. Results obtained by means of the questionnaire and by heart rate recording showed that the activity pattern was largely unaffected by pregnancy. The findings support the following conclusion: in a population of well-nourished women where the activity pattern is maintained during pregnancy, the increase in BMR represents approximately the main part of the pregnancy-induced increase in TEE, at least until gestational week 32.
PubMed ID
16469145 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and total and cause-specific mortality among Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268918
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Nina Roswall
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Guri Skeie
Anja Olsen
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun;30(6):509-17
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Diet
Edible Grain
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Several healthy dietary patterns have been linked to longevity. Recently, a Nordic dietary pattern was associated with a lower overall mortality. No study has, however, investigated this dietary pattern in relation to cause-specific mortality. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between adherence to a healthy Nordic food index (consisting of wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish/shellfish) and overall mortality, and death by cardiovascular disease, cancer, injuries/suicide and other causes. We conducted a prospective analysis in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 44,961 women, aged 29-49 years, who completed a food frequency questionnaire between 1991-1992, and have been followed up for mortality ever since, through Swedish registries. The median follow-up time is 21.3 years, and mortality rate ratios (MRR) were calculated using Cox Proportional Hazards Models. Compared to women with the lowest index score (0-1 points), those with the highest score (4-6 points) had an 18% lower overall mortality (MRR 0.82; 0.71-0.93, p
PubMed ID
25784368 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, body mass index and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor status: Women' Lifestyle and Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273881
Source
BMC Cancer. 2015;15:881
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Aesun Shin
Sven Sandin
Marie Lof
Karen L Margolis
Kyeezu Kim
Elisabeth Couto
Hans Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Source
BMC Cancer. 2015;15:881
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - pathology
Body mass index
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Postmenopause
Receptors, Estrogen - blood - genetics
Receptors, Progesterone - genetics
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
We aimed to estimate the effect of alcohol consumption on breast cancer risk and to test whether overweight and obesity modifies this association.
We included in the analysis 45,233 women enrolled in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health study between 1991 and 1992. Participants were followed for occurrence of breast cancer and death until December 2009. Poisson regression models were used, and analyses were done for overall breast cancer and for estrogen receptor positive or negative (ER+, ER-) and progesterone receptor positive and negative (PR+, PR-) tumors separately.
A total of 1,385 breast cancer cases were ascertained during the follow-up period. Overall, we found no statistically significant association between alcohol intake and breast cancer risk after adjustment for confounding, with an estimated relative risk (RR) of 1.01 (95 % CI: 0.98-1.04) for an increment in alcohol consumption of 5 g/day. A statistically significant elevated breast cancer risk associated with higher alcohol consumption was found only among women with BMI =25 (RR 1.03, 95 % CI 1.0-1.05 per 5 g/day increase).
An increase in breast cancer risk with higher alcohol consumption was found for breast cancers in women with a BMI =25 kg/m(2).
Notes
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PubMed ID
26552431 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment and prediction of thoracic gas volume in pregnant women: an evaluation in relation to body composition assessment using air displacement plethysmography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123247
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2013
Author
Pontus Henriksson
Marie Löf
Elisabet Forsum
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, SE 581 85 Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Jan 14;109(1):111-7
Date
Jan-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry - methods
Body Composition
Body mass index
Female
Gases - metabolism
Humans
Models, Biological
Obesity - diagnosis - pathology
Overweight - diagnosis - pathology
Plethysmography
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - pathology
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Respiration
Software
Sweden
Thoracic Cavity - metabolism - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Assessment of body fat (BF) in pregnant women is important when investigating the relationship between maternal nutrition and offspring health. Convenient and accurate body composition methods applicable during pregnancy are therefore needed. Air displacement plethysmography, as applied in Bod Pod, represents such a method since it can assess body volume (BV) which, in combination with body weight, can be used to calculate body density and body composition. However, BV must be corrected for the thoracic gas volume (TGV) of the subject. In non-pregnant women, TGV may be predicted using equations, based on height and age. It is unknown, however, whether these equations are valid during pregnancy. Thus, we measured the TGV of women in gestational week 32 (n 27) by means of plethysmography and predicted their TGV using equations established for non-pregnant women. Body weight and BV of the women was measured using Bod Pod. Predicted TGV was significantly (P = 0·033) higher than measured TGV by 6 % on average. Calculations in hypothetical women showed that this overestimation tended to be more pronounced in women with small TGV than in women with large TGV. The overestimation of TGV resulted in a small but significant (P = 0·043) overestimation of BF, equivalent to only 0·5 % BF, on average. A Bland-Altman analysis showed that the limits of agreement were narrow (from -1·9 to 2·9 % BF). Thus, although predicted TGV was biased and too high, the effect on BF was marginal and probably unimportant in many situations.
PubMed ID
22716660 View in PubMed
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The association between alcohol consumption and mortality: the Swedish women's lifestyle and health study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137602
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2011 Feb;26(2):81-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Gundula Behrens
Michael F Leitzmann
Sven Sandin
Marie Löf
Iris M Heid
Hans-Olov Adami
Elisabete Weiderpass
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Regensburg University Medical Center, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany. gundula.behrens@klinik.uni-regensburg.de
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2011 Feb;26(2):81-90
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - mortality
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk
Risk factors
Self Report
Sweden
Women's health
Abstract
Although light to moderate alcohol intake may reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, the effect on total mortality requires further study, particularly among young and middle-aged women. We studied the association between alcohol consumption and mortality from all causes, from cancer, and from CVD in the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health Study, a cohort of 47,921 female residents of Sweden aged 30-49 years at baseline in 1991/1992 and followed up to 2006. We estimated the relative risk (RR) of mortality associated with alcohol intake using Cox regression adjusted for age, smoking, BMI, saturated fat intake, physical activity, and education. During 713,295 person-years of follow-up, 1,119 deaths occurred, including 158 deaths from CVD, 673 deaths from cancer, and 288 deaths from other causes. Compared with non-drinking, light to moderate drinking (0.1-19.9 g of alcohol per day) showed a statistically significant inverse association with total mortality (RR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.71-0.98). Analyses of cause-specific mortality revealed an RR for CVD mortality of 0.69 (95% CI = 0.46-1.01) and an RR for cancer mortality of 0.92 (95% CI = 0.75-1.15). These results suggest that in younger women, a possibly beneficial effect of light to moderate drinking on future risk of mortality is limited to a prevention of CVD mortality but not cancer mortality.
PubMed ID
21267637 View in PubMed
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Associations of Fat Mass and Fat-Free Mass with Physical Fitness in 4-Year-Old Children: Results from the MINISTOP Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281360
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jul 30;8(8)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-2016
Author
Pontus Henriksson
Cristina Cadenas-Sanchez
Marja H Leppänen
Christine Delisle Nyström
Francisco B Ortega
Jeremy Pomeroy
Jonatan R Ruiz
Marie Löf
Source
Nutrients. 2016 Jul 30;8(8)
Date
Jul-30-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - ethnology
Biomarkers
Body Composition
Body mass index
Bone Development
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Child Behavior - ethnology
Child Development
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle Development
Muscle strength
Pediatric Obesity - diagnostic imaging - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Physical Fitness
Plethysmography, Whole Body
Regression Analysis
Sedentary Lifestyle - ethnology
Sweden
Abstract
Physical fitness is a powerful marker of health in youth. Studies in adolescents and adults suggest that higher fat mass is related to worse physical fitness. However, there is limited knowledge whether fat mass and fat-free mass are associated with physical fitness already in preschoolers. Baseline data from the MINISTOP (Mobile-based INtervention Intended to STop Obesity in Preschoolers) trial was utilized for this cross-sectional analysis. Body composition was assessed using air-displacement plethysmography. Fat mass index [fat mass (kg)/height² (m)] and fat-free mass index [fat-free mass (kg)/height² (m)] were used to provide height-adjusted measures of body composition. Physical fitness was measured using the PREFIT (FITness testing in PREschool children) battery, which assesses cardiorespiratory fitness, upper-body and lower-body muscular strength as well as motor fitness. In total, this study included 303 children (168 boys and 135 girls), who were on average 4.48 ± 0.15 years old. Higher fat mass index was associated with worse cardiorespiratory fitness (standardized ß = -0.17, p = 0.002), lower-body muscular strength (ß = -0.17, p = 0.003) and motor fitness (ß = -0.21, p
Notes
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PubMed ID
27483320 View in PubMed
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Associations of Parental Self-Efficacy With Diet, Physical Activity, Body Composition, and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Swedish Preschoolers: Results From the MINISTOP Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299393
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2018 04; 45(2):238-246
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Niyati Parekh
Pontus Henriksson
Christine Delisle Nyström
Kristin Silfvernagel
Jonatan R Ruiz
Francisco B Ortega
Jeremy Pomeroy
Marie Löf
Author Affiliation
1 New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Health Educ Behav. 2018 04; 45(2):238-246
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Accelerometry
Adult
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cardiorespiratory Fitness - physiology
Cell Phone
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Parents
Self Efficacy
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
High parental self-efficacy (PSE) has been associated with healthy diets and higher levels of physical activity (PA) in children; however, data on PSE in relation to body weight and body composition are scarce. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of PSE with measures of diet, PA, body composition, and physical fitness in early childhood.
We used baseline data from the MINISTOP trial in healthy Swedish children ( n = 301; 4.5 ± 0.15 years). PSE was assessed using a questionnaire, dietary data were collected using a mobile technology-assisted methodology, and PA was obtained (sedentary behavior and moderate-to-vigorous) by accelerometry. Body composition was measured using the pediatric option for BodPod and cardiorespiratory fitness by the 20 m shuttle run. Linear regression was conducted to evaluate cross-sectional associations of the outcomes in relation to total PSE and scores computed for the individual PSE factors: (1) diet, (2) limit setting of unhealthful behaviors, and (3) PA.
Higher scores of total PSE and the diet factor were associated with higher fruit intake (ß = 0.82 g/point and 1.99 g/point; p = .014 and .009, respectively) and lower consumption of unhealthy snacks (ß = -0.42 g/point and -0.89 g/point; p = .012 and .020, respectively) after adjustment for parental body mass index and education, respondent, and child's sex and age. No associations were observed between PSE and PA, body composition, or cardiorespiratory fitness.
Our study noted that PSE should be considered in conjunction with other strategies for a sustainable impact on childhood obesity.
PubMed ID
28629222 View in PubMed
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Body-composition development during early childhood and energy expenditure in response to physical activity in 1.5-y-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122219
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):567-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Britt Eriksson
Hanna Henriksson
Marie Löf
Ulf Hannestad
Elisabet Forsum
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2012 Sep;96(3):567-73
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - growth & development
Basal Metabolism
Body Composition
Body mass index
Calorimetry, Indirect
Child Development
Energy Metabolism
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity - epidemiology
Risk
Sex Characteristics
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The prevalence of childhood overweight and obesity has increased recently, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely known. Previous research has shown a correlation between the percentage of total body fat (TBF) and physical activity level (PAL). However, the PAL values used may involve a risk of spurious correlations because they are often based on predicted rather than measured estimates of resting energy metabolism.
We studied the development of body composition during early childhood and the relation between the percentage of TBF and PAL on the basis of the measured resting energy metabolism.
Body composition was previously measured in 108 children when they were 1 and 12 wk old. When 44 of these children (21 girls and 23 boys) were 1.5 y old, their total energy expenditure and TBF were assessed by using the doubly labeled water method. Resting energy metabolism, which was assessed by using indirect calorimetry, was used to calculate PAL.
Significant correlations were shown for TBF (r = 0.32, P = 0.035) and fat-free mass (r = 0.34, P = 0.025) between values (kg) assessed at 12 wk and 1.5 y of age. For TBF (kg) a significant interaction (P = 0.035) indicated a possible sex difference. PAL at 1.5 y was negatively correlated with the percentage of TBF (r = -0.40, P = 0.0076) and the increase in the percentage of TBF between 12 wk and 1.5 y (r = -0.38, P = 0.0105).
The results indicate that body fatness and physical activity interact during early childhood and thereby influence obesity risk. Our results are based on a small sample, but nevertheless, they motivate additional studies in boys compared with girls regarding the development of body composition during early life.
PubMed ID
22836033 View in PubMed
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Body composition in full-term healthy infants measured with air displacement plethysmography at 1 and 12 weeks of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98404
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2010 Apr;99(4):563-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Britt Eriksson
Marie Löf
Elisabet Forsum
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2010 Apr;99(4):563-8
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - growth & development
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Composition - physiology
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Plethysmography - methods
Pregnancy
Prenatal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Sex Factors
Sweden
Term Birth
Abstract
AIM: To use Pea Pod, a device based on air displacement plethysmography, to study body composition of healthy, full-term infants born to well-nourished women with a western life-style. METHODS: Body composition was assessed in 53 girls and 55 boys at 1 week (before 10 days of age) and at 12 weeks (between 77 and 91 days of age). RESULTS: At 1 week girls contained 13.4 +/- 3.7% body fat and boys 12.5 +/- 4.0%. At 12 weeks, these figures were 26.3 +/- 4.2% (girls) and 26.4 +/- 5.1% (boys). Body fat (%) did not differ significantly between the genders. Body fat (%) at the two measurements was not correlated. At 1 week, the weight (r = 0.20, p = 0.044) and BMI (r = 0.26, p = 0.007) of the infants, but not their body fat (g, %) or fat free mass (g), correlated with BMI before pregnancy in their mothers. CONCLUSIONS: Pea Pod has potential for use in studies investigating the effect of external (i.e. nutritional status) and internal (i.e. age, gender, gestational age at birth) factors on infant body composition. This may be of value when studying relationships between the nutritional situation during early life and adult health.
PubMed ID
20064135 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.