Skip header and navigation

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Home healthcare teams' assessments of pain in care recipients living with dementia: a Swedish exploratory study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273273
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2015 Sep;10(3):190-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Christina Elisabeth Karlsson
Marie Ernsth Bravell
Kristina Ek
Ingrid Bergh
Source
Int J Older People Nurs. 2015 Sep;10(3):190-200
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dementia - nursing
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment
Pain Measurement - methods
Qualitative Research
Sweden
Abstract
Pain assessment in people living with dementia is a challenge due to the complexity of pain and dementia and the difficulties in self-reporting. In home healthcare, nurses are frequently involved in pain assessment situations and there is a need to explore how home healthcare teams' manage pain assessment in this setting.
The study aimed to explore home healthcare teams' experiences of pain assessment among care recipients with dementia.
An exploratory qualitative design was used.
Open-ended individual interviews were conducted with thirteen registered nurses and ten nursing assistants, working in three different home healthcare teams in one municipality in western Sweden. Philosophical hermeneutics was utilised to interpret the home healthcare teams' experiences.
Four interpretations emerged: the need for trusting collaboration, the use of multiple assessment strategies, maintenance of staff continuity in care and assessment situations, and the need for extended time to assess pain.
The home healthcare teams recognise pain assessment in people with dementia as involving a complex interaction of sensory, cognitive, emotional and behavioural components in which efforts to acquire understanding of behavioural changes mainly guides their assessments. The solid team coherence between registered nurses and nursing assistants aided the assessment procedure. To assess pain, the teams used multiple methods that complemented one another. However, no systematic routines or appropriate evidence-based pain tools were used.
The team members'concern for care recipients when assessing pain is evident and needs to be acknowledged by the organisation which is responsible for the quality of care. Future studies should focus on further exploration of nurses' experiences with pain and dementia in home healthcare settings and address what nurses identify and how they deal with their findings. It is imperative to investigate how organisations and nurses can ensure best practices and how the implementation of evidence-based routines for assessing pain may aid in pain assessment situations.
PubMed ID
25399656 View in PubMed
Less detail

In Hospital We Trust: Experiences of older peoples' decision to seek hospital care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280309
Source
Geriatr Nurs. 2015 Jul-Aug;36(4):306-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jenny Hallgren
Marie Ernsth Bravell
Anna K Dahl Aslan
Iréne Josephson
Source
Geriatr Nurs. 2015 Jul-Aug;36(4):306-11
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Decision Making
Female
Health services needs and demand
Home Care Services
Hospitalization
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Patient transfer
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore how older people experience and perceive decisions to seek hospital care while receiving home health care. Twenty-two Swedish older persons were interviewed about their experiences of decision to seek hospital while receiving home health care. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The findings consist of one interpretative theme describing an overall confidence in hospital staff to deliver both medical and psychosocial health care, In Hospital We Trust, with three underlying categories: Superior Health Care, People's Worries, and Biomedical Needs. Findings indicate a need for establishing confidence and ensuring sufficient qualifications, both medical and psychological, in home health care staff to meet the needs of older people. Understanding older peoples' arguments for seeking hospital care may have implications for how home care staff address individuals' perceived needs. Fulfillment of perceived health needs may reduce avoidable hospitalizations and consequently improve quality of life.
PubMed ID
25971421 View in PubMed
Less detail

Needs and care of older people living at home in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130632
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Feb;40(1):1-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Sigurveig H Sigurdardottir
Gerdt Sundstrom
Bo Malmberg
Marie Ernsth Bravell
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, School of Social Sciences, University of Iceland, Iceland. sighsig@hi.is
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Feb;40(1):1-9
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers
Family Characteristics
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Research
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Home Care Services - utilization
Home Nursing - utilization
Humans
Iceland
Independent living
Male
Needs Assessment
Qualitative Research
Social Support
Abstract
The Icelandic old-age care system is universal and the official goal is to support older people live independently for as long as possible. The aim of this study is to analyse living conditions and use of formal and informal care of older people in Iceland.
The results are based on the new study ICEOLD, a telephone survey which included questions on social network, health, activities of daily living, and received support from the community and/or from relatives, neighbours, and friends.
Almost half of the sample (47%) receives some kind of care, with 27% of them receiving only informal care, which is understood to mean that informal care is of great importance and families are the main providers of help. For hypothetical future long-term care, older people wish to be cared for in their homes, but those already in need of assistance prefer to be cared for in institutions.
Caring relatives are the main providers of support to older people in their homes and it is important to provide them with suitable formal support when the care responsibility increases.
As the care system in Iceland is now under reconstruction, the important contribution of informal carers must be recognised and taken into account when planning the care of older people.
PubMed ID
21983193 View in PubMed
Less detail