Skip header and navigation

Refine By

54 records – page 1 of 6.

Active cytomegalovirus infection diagnosed by real-time PCR in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a prospective, controlled observational study (.).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285270
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Sep;51(9):1075-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Mari Thörn
Fredrik Rorsman
Anders Rönnblom
Per Sangfelt
Alkwin Wanders
Britt-Marie Eriksson
Kåre Bondeson
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016 Sep;51(9):1075-80
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Cytomegalovirus
Cytomegalovirus Infections - diagnosis
DNA, Viral - analysis
Feces - virology
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Immunosuppression - adverse effects
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
It is assumed that cytomegaloviral (CMV) infection in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is caused by reactivation due to the immunosuppressive therapy, but the role of CMV as a pathophysiological factor and prognostic marker in IBD is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate CMV infection in IBD, with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry, with emphasis on newly diagnosed disease.
In this prospective, controlled study, 67 patients with IBD and 34 control patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or rectal bleeding were included. Serology for CMV was analysed along with CMV DNA in plasma, mucosal biopsies, and faeces. Mucosal biopsies were further analysed with histopathology and CMV immunohistochemistry.
Detection of CMV IgM was more common in patients with IBD, compared to controls, 21% versus 3%. CMV DNA was found in 16% of patients with newly diagnosed, untreated IBD and in 38% of steroid-treated patients. Four of the five patients that needed urgent surgery were CMV-DNA positive in at least one of three sample types. None of the controls had detectable CMV DNA.
Active CMV infection was found in high proportions of newly diagnosed untreated patients with IBD, in patients on immunosuppression and in patients in the need of surgery. Low CMV-DNA levels in non-immunosuppressed patients were not a risk factor for the development of more severe IBD, while the detection of CMV DNA in patients on immunosuppressive therapy may foresee disease progression.
PubMed ID
27142339 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acute stroke alert activation, emergency service use, and reperfusion therapy in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282026
Source
Brain Behav. 2017 Apr;7(4):e00654
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Marie Eriksson
Eva-Lotta Glader
Bo Norrving
Birgitta Stegmayr
Kjell Asplund
Source
Brain Behav. 2017 Apr;7(4):e00654
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Emergency Medical Services - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Reperfusion - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Stroke - epidemiology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Ambulance services and stroke alerts reduce the time from stroke onset to acute stroke diagnosis. We describe the use of stroke alerts and ambulance services in different hospitals and patient groups and their relationship with reperfusion therapy.
This nationwide study included 49,907 patients admitted with acute stroke who were registered in The Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) in 2011-2012.
The proportions of patients admitted as stroke alerts out of all acute stroke admissions varied from 12.2% to 45.7% in university hospitals (n = 9), 0.5% to 38.7% in specialized nonuniversity hospitals (n = 22), and 4.2% to 40.3% in community hospitals (n = 41). Younger age, atrial fibrillation (AF), living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were factors associated with a higher probability of stroke alerts. Living alone, primary school education, non-European origin, previous stroke, diabetes, smoking, and dependency in activities of daily living (ADL) were associated with a lower probability of stroke alert. The proportion of patients arriving at the hospital by ambulance varied from 60.3% to 94.5%. Older age, living alone, primary school education, being born in a European country, previous stroke, AF, dependency in ADL, living in an institution, reduced consciousness upon admission, and hemorrhagic stroke were associated with ambulance services. Hospital stroke alert frequencies correlated strongly with reperfusion rates (r = .75).
Acute stroke alerts have a significant potential to improve stroke reperfusion rates. Prehospital stroke management varies conspicuously between hospitals and patient groups, and the elderly and patients living alone have a markedly reduced likelihood of stroke alerts.
Notes
Cites: BMC Geriatr. 2009 Aug 05;9:3519656359
Cites: Stroke. 2011 Aug;42(8):2263-821659638
Cites: Patient Relat Outcome Meas. 2015 Feb 25;6:61-7325750550
Cites: Stroke. 2014 Sep;45(9):2762-825074515
Cites: Biostatistics. 2014 Oct;15(4):651-6424812420
Cites: Neurology. 2013 Sep 17;81(12):1071-623946303
Cites: Neuropsychologia. 2015 May;71:217-2425858602
Cites: Neurosurgery. 2014 Mar;74(3):281-5; discussion 28524276505
Cites: J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2014 Nov-Dec;23(10):2773-925312034
Cites: Int J Stroke. 2014 Apr;9(3):333-4024593156
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1997 Apr;29(4):484-919095009
Cites: Cerebrovasc Dis. 2013;36(5-6):383-724248034
Cites: Neurology. 2012 Jul 24;79(4):306-1322622858
Cites: Stroke. 2015 Mar;46(3):806-1225657174
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 2014 Jan;129(1):49-5523710712
Cites: J Am Heart Assoc. 2012 Aug;1(4):e00234523130167
Cites: Eur J Neurol. 2014;21(1):11-2024102755
Cites: Acta Neurochir (Wien). 1988;91(1-2):12-203394542
Cites: JAMA Neurol. 2013 Sep 1;70(9):1126-3223817961
Cites: Stroke. 2011 Oct;42(10):2983-921885841
Cites: J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis. 2013 Feb;22(2):113-821820919
Cites: JAMA. 2014 Apr 23-30;311(16):1632-4024756513
Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 2000 Mar;18(2):130-410750914
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2013 Jun;12(6):585-9623684084
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Qual Outcomes. 2012 Jul 1;5(4):514-2222787065
Cites: Cerebrovasc Dis. 2008;25(5):457-50718477843
PubMed ID
28413705 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol consumption and risk of incident atrial fibrillation: A population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306634
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2020 06; 76:50-57
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2020
Author
Cecilia Johansson
Marcus M Lind
Marie Eriksson
Maria Wennberg
Jonas Andersson
Lars Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Skellefteå Research Unit, Umeå University, 931 86 Skellefteå, Sweden. Electronic address: cecilia.johansson@regionvasterbotten.se.
Source
Eur J Intern Med. 2020 06; 76:50-57
Date
06-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common tachyarrhythmia. High alcohol consumption is associated with increased AF risk. It remains unclear whether lower levels of alcohol consumption are also associated with AF risk, and whether the association differs between men and women. In this study, we investigated the association between low to moderate levels of alcohol consumption and AF risk in men and women.
We performed a population-based cohort study of 109,230 health examination participants in northern Sweden. Data regarding alcohol intake were obtained using a questionnaire administered at the health examination. Incident AF cases were identified from the Swedish National Patient Registry.
AF was diagnosed in 5,230 individuals during a total follow-up of 1,484,547 person-years. Among men, AF risk increased over quartiles of weekly alcohol consumption (P for trend 0.001). Men with alcohol consumption in the highest quartile (=4.83 standard drinks [each drink containing 12 gs of ethanol] per week; SDW) had a HR of 1.21 (95% CI 1.09-1.34) for AF compared to men in the lowest quartile (
Notes
CommentIn: Eur J Intern Med. 2020 Jun;76:23-25 PMID 32327319
PubMed ID
32147331 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antithrombotic Treatment Following Intracerebral Hemorrhage in Patients With and Without Atrial Fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267173
Source
Stroke. 2015 Aug;46(8):2094-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Johanna Pennlert
Kjell Asplund
Bo Carlberg
Per-Gunnar Wiklund
Aase Wisten
Signild Åsberg
Marie Eriksson
Source
Stroke. 2015 Aug;46(8):2094-9
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Atrial Fibrillation - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cerebral Hemorrhage - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Patients who survive intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) often have compelling indications for anticoagulant and antiplatelet medication. This nationwide observational study aimed to determine the extent and predictors of antithrombotic treatment after ICH in Sweden.
Patients with a first-ever ICH in the Swedish Stroke Register (Riksstroke) 2005 to 2012 who survived hospital discharge were included. Riksstroke data were individually linked with other national registers to determine comorbid conditions and dispensed prescriptions of antithrombotic agents.
Among the 2777 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF), the proportion with a dispensed prescription of antithrombotic agents was 8.5% (anticoagulants) and 36.6% (antiplatelet agents) within 6 months and 11.1% (anticoagulants) and 43.6% (antiplatelet agents) within 1 year. Among the 11 268 patients without AF, the corresponding figures were 1.6% (anticoagulants) and 13.8% (antiplatelet agents) within 6 months and 2.0% (anticoagulants) and 17.5% (antiplatelet agents) within 1 year. In patients with AF, predictors of anticoagulant treatment were less severe ICH, younger age, previous anticoagulation, valvular disease, and previous ischemic stroke. High CHA2DS2-VASc (congestive heart failure, hypertension, age, diabetes mellitus, stroke [doubled], vascular disease, age, and sex category [female]) scores did not correlate with anticoagulant treatment. There was a positive correlation between high CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio, elderly, drugs/alcohol) scores (rs=0.590, P
PubMed ID
26159794 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison of blood pressure measurements between an automated oscillometric device and a Hawksley random-zero sphygmomanometer in the northern Sweden MONICA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122732
Source
Blood Press Monit. 2012 Aug;17(4):164-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Marie Eriksson
Bo Carlberg
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics, Umeå School of Business and Economics Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. marie.eriksson@stat.umu.se
Source
Blood Press Monit. 2012 Aug;17(4):164-70
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Determination - instrumentation
Female
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Oscillometry - instrumentation
Sphygmomanometers
Sweden
Abstract
The Hawksley random-zero sphygmomanometer (random-zero) has been used widely in epidemiological observation studies. This study compares blood pressure measurements using the random-zero with measurements using an automated oscillometric device and suggests a correction of the automated oscillometric measurements to enable comparisons of blood pressure levels over time.
The northern Sweden MONICA population survey 2009 included 1729 participants, 853 men and 876 women, 25-74 years old. Blood pressure was measured using both random-zero and an automated oscillometric device in all participants. The Omron M7 digital blood pressure monitor was used for automated oscillometric measurements. A linear mixed model was used to derive a formula to adjust the automated oscillometric readings.
Automated oscillometric measurements of systolic blood pressure were generally lower than random-zero measurements in women [oscillometric mean 122.1 mmHg (95% confidence interval: 121.0-123.2) versus random-zero mean 124.4 mmHg (123.5-125.5)], whereas automated oscillometric measurements of systolic blood pressure were generally higher than random-zero measurements in men [oscillometric 131.1 mmHg (130.0-132.2) versus random-zero 129.0 mmHg (127.9-130.1)]. For diastolic blood pressure, automated oscillometric measurements were higher in both women [oscillometric 79.9 mmHg (79.2-80.5) versus random-zero 76.7 mmHg (76.0-77.4)] and men [oscillometric 83.1 mmHg (82.4-83.8) vs. random-zero 81.2 mmHg (80.6-81.9)]. The difference also varied with age and order of measurement. Adjustment of the automated oscillometric measurements using mixed model regression coefficients produced estimates of blood pressure that were close to the random-zero measurements.
Blood pressure measurements using an automated oscillometric device differ from those with random-zero, but the oscillometric measurements can be adjusted, on the basis of sex, age and measurement order, to be similar to the random-zero measurements.
PubMed ID
22781634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Declining mortality from subarachnoid hemorrhage: changes in incidence and case fatality from 1985 through 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179121
Source
Stroke. 2004 Sep;35(9):2059-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Birgitta Stegmayr
Marie Eriksson
Kjell Asplund
Author Affiliation
Department Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, SE-901 85 Umeå, Sweden. birgitta.stegmayr@medicin.umu.se
Source
Stroke. 2004 Sep;35(9):2059-63
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Northern Sweden has one of the highest incidence rates of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) among the populations covered by the WHO MONICA (Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease) Project, approximately twice as high as in the other populations in Europe. In this study, trends in incidence, 28-day case fatality (CF), and mortality in SAH were followed over a 16-year period.
Since 1985, all SAHs in northern Sweden among patients 25 to 74 years old have been validated using strict MONICA criteria. From 1985 through 2000, 392 men and 592 women had SAH. During 3 years, 1997 to 1999, SAH among those aged 75 and older were also included.
The total incidence among those 25 years and older was 13.3 per 100 000 in men and 24.4 per 100 000 in women. During the 16 years of observation, age standardized incidence in the group aged 25 to 74 years decreased significantly in men (P for trend
PubMed ID
15272133 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depressive mood after a cardiac event: gender inequality and participation in rehabilitation programme.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45747
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):295-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Signild Norrman
Birgitta Stegmayr
Marie Eriksson
Bo Hedbäck
Gunilla Burell
Christine Brulin
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Heart Center, University Hospital, SE-90185 Umeå, Sweden. signild.norrman@vll.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):295-302
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - psychology - rehabilitation
Coronary Artery Bypass - psychology - rehabilitation
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - psychology - rehabilitation
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Depressive mood after a cardiac event is common with serious consequences for the patient. AIMS: To compare gender in depressive mood during the first year after a cardiac event and to evaluate the effect of participating in a multidimensional secondary prevention program on depressive mood. METHODS: 166 men and 54 women,
PubMed ID
15572018 View in PubMed
Less detail

Differences in cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic status do not explain the increased risk of death after a first stroke in diabetic patients: results from the Swedish Stroke Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112535
Source
Diabetologia. 2013 Oct;56(10):2181-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Marie Eriksson
Kjell Asplund
Bart Van Rompaye
Mats Eliasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics, Umeå School of Business and Economics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden. marie.eriksson@stat.umu.se
Source
Diabetologia. 2013 Oct;56(10):2181-6
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Risk factors
Social Class
Stroke - epidemiology - mortality
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
This study compared survival rates and causes of death after stroke in diabetic and non-diabetic patients in Sweden. We hypothesised that differences in cardiovascular risk factors, acute stroke management or socioeconomic status (SES) could explain the higher risk of death after stroke in diabetic patients.
The study included 155,806 first-ever stroke patients from the Swedish Stroke Register between 2001 and 2009. Individual patient information on SES was retrieved from Statistics Sweden. Survival was followed until 2010 (532,140 person-years) with a median follow-up time of 35 months. Multiple Cox regression was used to analyse survival adjusting for differences in background characteristics, in-hospital treatment, SES and year of stroke. Causes of death were analysed using cause-specific proportional hazard models.
The risk of death after stroke increased in diabetic patients (HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.25, 1.31), and this risk was greater in younger patients and in women. Differences in background characteristics, cardiovascular risk factors, in-hospital treatment and SES did not explain the increased risk of death after stroke (HR 1.35, 95% CI 1.32, 1.37) after adjustments. Diabetic patients had an increased probability of dying from cerebrovascular disease and even higher probabilities of dying from other circulatory causes and all other causes except cancer.
Differences in cardiovascular risk factors, acute stroke management and SES do not explain the lower survival after stroke in diabetic compared with non-diabetic patients. Diabetic patients are at higher risk of dying from cardiovascular causes and all other causes of death, other than cancer.
PubMed ID
23820634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Discarding heparins as treatment for progressive stroke in Sweden 2001 to 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140212
Source
Stroke. 2010 Nov;41(11):2552-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Marie Eriksson
Anna Stecksén
Eva-Lotta Glader
Bo Norrving
Peter Appelros
Kerstin Hulter Åsberg
Birgitta Stegmayr
Andreas Terént
Kjell Asplund
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. marie.eriksson@medicin.umu.se
Source
Stroke. 2010 Nov;41(11):2552-8
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Disease Progression
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Heparin - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns - trends
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Stroke - drug therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
High-dose heparin has been used extensively to treat patients with progressive ischemic stroke, but the scientific support is poor and the current stroke guidelines advise against its use. We studied how heparin treatment for progressive stroke has been discarded in Sweden.
All 78 hospitals in Sweden that admit acute stroke patients participate in Riks-Stroke, the Swedish Stroke Register. During 2001 to 2008, information on the use of high-dose heparin was available for 155,344 patients with acute ischemic stroke. The determinants as to region, patient characteristics, and stroke service settings were analyzed.
Use of heparin for progressive stroke declined from 7.5% (2001) to 1.6% (2008) of all patients with ischemic stroke. The marked regional differences present in 2001 were reduced over time. The use of heparin declined at a similar rate in all types of hospital settings, in stroke units vs nonstroke units, and in neurological vs medical wards. Independent predictors of use of heparin included younger age, first-ever stroke, independence in activities of daily living before stroke, atrial fibrillation, no aspirin treatment, and lowered consciousness on admission.
There is no immediate, stepwise effect of new scientific information and national guidelines on clinical practice. Rather, the phasing out of heparin has followed a linear course over several years, with less variation between hospitals. We speculate that open comparisons between hospitals in a national stroke register may have helped to reduce the variations in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
20930151 View in PubMed
Less detail

The disparity in long-term survival after a first stroke in patients with and without diabetes persists: the Northern Sweden MONICA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121448
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2012;34(2):153-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Marie Eriksson
Bo Carlberg
Mats Eliasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Statistics, USBE, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. marie.eriksson@stat.umu.se
Source
Cerebrovasc Dis. 2012;34(2):153-60
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Atrial Fibrillation - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Complications - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Prevalence
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Stroke - complications - mortality
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Diabetes is an established risk factor for stroke. Compared to nondiabetic patients, diabetic patients also have an increased risk of new vascular events and death after stroke. We analyzed how differences in long-term survival between diabetic and nondiabetic stroke patients have changed over time, and if differences varied with respect to sex and age.
This population-based study included 12,375 first-ever stroke patients, 25-74 years old, who were registered in the Northern Sweden MONICA Stroke Registry 1985-2005. Uniform diagnostic criteria for stroke case ascertainment were used throughout the study period. The diagnosis of diabetes was based on medical records or diabetes diagnosed during the acute stroke event. Patients were separated into four cohorts according to year of stroke and followed for survival until August 30, 2008.
The diabetes prevalence at stroke onset was 21%, similar in men and women, and remained stable throughout the study period. The diabetic patients were an average of 2 years older, more often nonsmokers and more likely to have antihypertensive treatment, antithrombotics, atrial fibrillation, and a history of myocardial infarction or transient ischemic attack than the nondiabetic patients. The total follow-up time was 86,086 patient-years during which a total of 1,930 (75.7%) of the diabetic patients and 5,744 (58.5%) of the nondiabetic patients died (p
PubMed ID
22907276 View in PubMed
Less detail

54 records – page 1 of 6.