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Acromegaly incidence, prevalence, complications and long-term prognosis: a nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280006
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2016 Sep;175(3):181-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Jakob Dal
Ulla Feldt-Rasmussen
Marianne Andersen
Lars Ø Kristensen
Peter Laurberg
Lars Pedersen
Olaf M Dekkers
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Jens Otto L Jørgensen
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2016 Sep;175(3):181-90
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acromegaly - diagnosis - epidemiology
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Prevalence
Prognosis
Registries
Stroke - epidemiology
Abstract
Valid data on acromegaly incidence, complications and mortality are scarce. The Danish Health Care System enables nationwide studies with complete follow-up and linkage among health-related databases to assess acromegaly incidence, prevalence, complications and mortality in a population-based cohort study.
All incident cases of acromegaly in Denmark (1991-2010) were identified from health registries and validated by chart review. We estimated the annual incidence rate of acromegaly per 10(6) person-years (py) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). For every patient, 10 persons were sampled from the general population as a comparison cohort. Cox regression and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were used.
Mean age at diagnosis (48.7 years (CI: 95%: 47.2-50.1)) and annual incidence rate (3.8 cases/10(6) persons (95% CI: 3.6-4.1)) among the 405 cases remained stable. The prevalence in 2010 was 85 cases/10(6) persons. The patients were at increased risk of diabetes mellitus (HR: 4.0 (95% CI: 2.7-5.8)), heart failure (HR: 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-4.5)), venous thromboembolism (HR: 2.3 (95% CI: 1.1-5.0)), sleep apnoea (HR: 11.7 (95% CI: 7.0-19.4)) and arthropathy (HR: 2.1 (95% CI: 1.6-2.6)). The complication risk was also increased before the diagnosis of acromegaly. Overall mortality risk was elevated (HR: 1.3 (95% CI: 1.0-1.7)) but uninfluenced by treatment modality.
(i) The incidence rate and age at diagnosis of acromegaly have been stable over decades, and the prevalence is higher than previously reported. (ii) The risk of complications is very high even before the diagnosis. (iii) Mortality risk remains elevated but uninfluenced by mode of treatment.
PubMed ID
27280374 View in PubMed
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Association study of common variants in the sFRP1 gene region and parameters of bone strength and body composition in two independent healthy Caucasian male cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128687
Source
Mol Genet Metab. 2012 Mar;105(3):508-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Eveline Boudin
Elke Piters
Erik Fransen
Torben Leo Nielsen
Marianne Andersen
Greet Roef
Youri Taes
Kim Brixen
Wim Van Hul
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Belgium. eveline.boudin@ua.ac.be
Source
Mol Genet Metab. 2012 Mar;105(3):508-15
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Aged
Belgium
Body Composition - genetics
Body mass index
Bone Density - genetics
Bone and Bones - physiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Genotype
Humans
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Middle Aged
Osteoporosis - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Young Adult
Abstract
Bone mineral density (BMD) and bone strength are predictive parameters for the development of osteoporosis and related fracture later in life. Although it is well known that BMD and bone strength have a high heritability, not much of the variation is already explained. Mice models showed that sFRP1 has an influence on bone formation. Therefore this study aimed to investigate the effect of common genetic variation on BMD and bone strength in Caucasian men of different ages. Using HapMap we selected 13 tagSNPs which tag most common genetic variation in and around sFRP1 and we genotyped these SNPs in the young cohort of the Odense Androgen Study (OAS). The OAS includes a total of 1383 Danish men from two different age groups ([20-29 years]: N=783; [60-74 years]: N=600) and is well characterised. The subjects were phenotyped for BMD at several sites, and additionally for body composition and hip geometry parameters. Based on the results of the young cohort we selected three SNPs for further analysis in the complete OAS population. To conclude we tried to replicate the results of two SNPs in an independent population of 994 Belgian men. We found a strong association for rs9694405 with BMI as well in both cohorts separately as in the whole OAS population. Further we found rs4736965 associated with several hip geometry parameters in the same population. However we were not able to replicate those results in the Belgian population. At last we found in the OAS population age specific effects for rs10106678 with whole body BMD and waist to hip ratio.
PubMed ID
22178351 View in PubMed
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Association study of polymorphisms in the SOST gene region and parameters of bone strength and body composition in both young and elderly men: data from the Odense Androgen Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129727
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2012 Jan;90(1):30-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Elke Piters
Fenna de Freitas
Torben Leo Nielsen
Marianne Andersen
Kim Brixen
Wim Van Hul
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University and University Hospital of Antwerp, Prins Boudewijnlaan 43B, 2650 Edegem, Belgium.
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2012 Jan;90(1):30-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Body Composition - genetics
Body mass index
Bone Density - genetics
Bone Morphogenetic Proteins - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Femur Neck - physiology
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Markers - genetics
Genotype
Humans
Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein-5 - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Abstract
By means of different genetic association studies the SOST gene, encoding sclerostin, has repeatedly been suggested to regulate bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis susceptibility. This study aimed at a further understanding of the importance of two previously studied single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SOST gene, rs10534024 (SRP3) and rs9902563 (SRP9), in the Odense Androgen Study (OAS) cohort. This cohort includes a total of 1,383 Danish men from two different age groups, 20-29 years (n = 783) and 60-74 years (n = 600), and is well characterized. Subjects were phenotyped for BMD at several sites and additionally for body composition and hip geometric parameters. In a combined analysis of the young and the elderly OAS, no associations were found for SRP3 either with BMD or with hip geometry. Instead, we found that this polymorphism had a relatively large effect on weight (-1.149 kg) and body mass index (-0.389 kg/m(2)) (P = 0.021 and 0.006 under a codominant model). For SRP9, a significant association was found for femoral neck BMD (+0.020 g/cm(2), P = 0.020) and a trend toward significance for hip geometry (buckling ratio of the narrow neck) but only when considering a recessive effect of the minor allele (C). No age-specific effects were found for either of the two SNPs. In summary, we are the first to find interesting associations between SRP3 and body composition. For SRP9, we replicated a site-specific association with femoral neck BMD. In addition, we report a novel association for this polymorphism with hip geometry.
PubMed ID
22076526 View in PubMed
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Birth weight and polycystic ovary syndrome in adult life: a register-based study on 523,757 Danish women born 1973-1991.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118503
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Mar 1;99(3):777-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2013
Author
Hanne Mumm
Mads Kamper-Jørgensen
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Dorte Glintborg
Marianne Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. hanne.mumm@ouh.regionsyddanmark.dk
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Mar 1;99(3):777-82
Date
Mar-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the association between birth weight and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in adult life in Danish women born 1973-1991.
Register study.
Data were extracted from the Danish Medical Birth Register and the Danish National Patient Register (NPR).
All female children born of Danish mothers in Denmark between 1973 and 1991 were included (n = 523,757) and followed for a total of 4,739,547 person-years at risk.
None.
Information on birth weight was extracted from the Danish Medical Birth Register. The cohort was followed up in the NPR for PCOS diagnoses from age 15 years until the end of 2006. Furthermore, information on maternal diabetes diagnoses was extracted from the NPR.
The risk of PCOS was significantly increased in women with birth weight =4,500 g (incidence rate ratio, 1.57; 95% confidence interval 1.21-2.03) compared to women with birth weight 3,000-3,499 g. All women with birth weight =4,500 g were born large for gestational age and a birth weight of 4,500 g represented the 98.5th percentile of the birth weights. Women born of mothers diagnosed with diabetes were at increased risk of PCOS. In these women the risk of PCOS increased with decreasing birth weight.
The risk of PCOS was increased in women born with birth weight =4,500 g. In women of diabetic mothers we found an increased risk of PCOS, which was inversely related to birth weight.
PubMed ID
23200688 View in PubMed
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[Changes in reporting on passive smoking by parents of small children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17986
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Jan 8;124(1):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-8-2004
Author
Karl Erik Lund
Asgeir R Helgason
Marianne Andersen
Author Affiliation
Statens institutt for rusmiddelforskning, Postboks 565 Sentrum, 0105 Oslo. kel@sirus.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Jan 8;124(1):16-9
Date
Jan-8-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parents - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The Norwegian Cancer Society has led a comprehensive information campaign since 1995 with the aim of reducing young children's ETS (environmental tobacco smoke) exposure in their homes. The aims of the present study were to assess changes in parents' reporting of child exposure to ETS, attitudes towards ETS, and awareness regarding the potential hazards of passive smoking to children. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A questionnaire along with a stamped, addressed envelope was sent to a stratified random sample of 1000 households in Norway with three-year-old children at the time of the investigation (May 1995 and August 2001). RESULTS: According to parents, the prevalence of households in which children were exposed to ETS fell from 32% in 1995 to 18% in 2001. In both surveys, the probability of children being exposed was positively correlated with the number of parents smoking and inversely correlated with length of education, negative attitudes towards ETS and strength of health-risk awareness. INTERPRETATION: The observed changes must be viewed in the light of the media focus on passive smoking during this period, a nationwide information campaign and as an artifact caused by more underreporting of a behaviour that is being internalised as in breach of a norm.
PubMed ID
14716385 View in PubMed
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Chronic diseases in elderly men: underreporting and underdiagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129056
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):177-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Morten Frost
Kristian Wraae
Claire Gudex
Torben Nielsen
Kim Brixen
Claus Hagen
Marianne Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Endocrinology, Odense University Hospital, Odense C DK-5000, Denmark. frostnielsen@yahoo.com
Source
Age Ageing. 2012 Mar;41(2):177-83
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Men's Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Self Report
Sex Factors
Telephone
Abstract
prevalence estimates for chronic diseases and associated risk factors are needed for priority setting and disease prevention strategies. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the self-reported and clinical prevalence of common chronic disorders in elderly men.
a questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 4,975 men aged 60-74 years. An age-stratified randomised sample (n = 1,845) of those with complete questionnaires was invited to participate in a telephone interview (n = 864), followed by physical examination (n = 600). Self-reported data on risk factors and disease prevalence were compared with data from hospital medical records.
physical inactivity, smoking and excessive alcohol intake were reported by 27, 22 and 17% of the study population, respectively. Except for diabetes, all the chronic diseases investigated, including hypertension, musculoskeletal and respiratory diseases were underreported by study participants. Erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism were substantially underreported in the study population even though these diseases were found to affect 48 and 21% of the participants, respectively.
the study showed a high prevalence of detrimental life style factors including smoking, excessive alcohol consumption and physical inactivity in elderly Danish men. Except for diabetes and respiratory disease, chronic diseases were underreported and in particular erectile dysfunction and osteoporosis were underdiagnosed in the study population, underlining the importance of awareness of chronic diseases among both the general population and physicians.
Notes
Comment In: J Urol. 2012 Nov;188(5):188723059245
PubMed ID
22146130 View in PubMed
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Common genetic variation in the DKK1 gene is associated with hip axis length but not with bone mineral density and bone turnover markers in young adult men: results from the Odense Androgen Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145854
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2010 Apr;86(4):271-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Elke Piters
Wendy Balemans
Torben Leo Nielsen
Marianne Andersen
Eveline Boudin
Kim Brixen
Wim Van Hul
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp and University Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium. elke.piters@ua.ac.be
Source
Calcif Tissue Int. 2010 Apr;86(4):271-81
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biological Markers - analysis - metabolism
Body Weights and Measures
Bone Density - genetics
Bone Remodeling - genetics
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Epistasis, Genetic
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation - physiology
Hip - anatomy & histology
Hip Fractures - genetics
Humans
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins - genetics
Linkage Disequilibrium
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
LRP5 was recently confirmed as an important susceptibility gene for osteoporosis. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of DKK1 polymorphisms on bone mineral density (BMD), hip geometry, and bone turnover. DKK1 is a secreted protein that binds to LRP5/6 receptors and inhibits canonical Wnt signaling. Using HapMap, we selected three SNPs covering the genetic variation in a 13.53-kb region comprising DKK1. The Odense Androgen Study is a population-based study comprising 783 Caucasian men aged 20-29 years. BMD and hip structural parameters were available for study. Bone turnover markers were used as a secondary end point. All analyses were repeated after adjusting for covariables and in subgroups according to physical activity. We found no significant association between DKK1 and BMD or markers of bone turnover; however, a significant association (P = 0.012) was found for rs1569198 with hip axis length (HAL), independent of BMD and height. Moreover, the association seemed to be driven by the non-sedentary subgroup (P = 0.004). Haplotype analysis further confirmed the association of rs1569198 with HAL. Furthermore, we obtained indications for interaction between DKK1 and LRP5 genotypes for different hip geometry parameters. As almost all variance within the DKK1 gene was covered, we conclude that common variation in this gene does not markedly influence BMD or bone turnover markers in young men. In this population, however, a common SNP in DKK1 does have a significant effect on HAL, implying a possible effect on hip fracture risk in the general population. This finding could be of interest but needs replication in independent populations.
PubMed ID
20101398 View in PubMed
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Fracture Risk Is Decreased in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Register-Based and Population-Based Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278166
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2016 Apr;31(4):709-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
Katrine Hass Rubin
Dorte Glintborg
Mads Nybo
Marianne Andersen
Bo Abrahamsen
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2016 Apr;31(4):709-17
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polycystic Ovary Syndrome - complications - epidemiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
Hyperandrogenism, obesity, and hyperinsulinemia may protect against osteoporosis, whereas amenorrhea, increased cortisol, and low growth hormone may be associated with higher fracture risk in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The objective of this study was to investigate fracture risk in PCOS. In the PCOS Denmark study, women with PCOS and/or hirsutism were identified in the Danish National Patient Register (1995-2012). Each patient was assigned three age-matched controls on the index date of PCOS diagnosis. Individuals with a previous endocrine diagnosis were excluded. Within PCOS Denmark, we embedded a well-characterized subcohort of patients, PCOS OUH, diagnosed with PCOS at Odense University Hospital (n = 1217). We identified incident fractures by International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes and used conditional Cox regression analyses to compare fracture risk. In the PCOS Denmark study, there were 19,199 women with PCOS and 57,483 controls were included, mean age 30.6 years (range, 12-60 years). Fracture rates were decreased in PCOS Denmark (10.3/1000 patient years) versus controls (13.6/1000 patient years). The adjusted ORs were 0.76 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.80) for all fractures, 0.82 (95% CI, 0.74 to 0.92) for major osteoporotic fractures, and 0.57 (95% CI, 0.47 to 0.70) for fractures of head and face. The risk reduction was more pronounced below the age of 30 years at diagnosis. Women with PCOS had significant more hospital contacts due to strains and sprains. In the PCOS OUH subcohort, the risk reduction of fractures did not differ between PCOS women with elevated versus normal testosterone levels and the risk reduction was nominally smaller in overweight versus normal weight PCOS women. Women with PCOS had reduced risk of fractures, in particular of the appendicular skeleton. The risk reduction was greater in women with younger age at diagnosis suggesting that the skeletal effects of PCOS may be greater in women who have not yet reached peak bone mass. Reduced participation in sports activities was probably not the reason for the reduced risk of fractures.
PubMed ID
26542642 View in PubMed
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Genetic association study of WNT10B polymorphisms with BMD and adiposity parameters in Danish and Belgian males.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117192
Source
Endocrine. 2013 Aug;44(1):247-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Jasmijn K Van Camp
Sigri Beckers
Doreen Zegers
Eveline Boudin
Torben Leo Nielsen
Marianne Andersen
Greet Roef
Youri Taes
Kim Brixen
Wim Van Hul
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, University of Antwerp, Prins Boudewijnlaan 43, 2650, Edegem, Antwerp, Belgium.
Source
Endocrine. 2013 Aug;44(1):247-54
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity - genetics
Adult
Aged
Belgium - epidemiology
Bone Density - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Genetic Association Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Genetic
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - genetics
Wnt Proteins - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Because of the importance of the Wnt pathway in the development and maintenance of both adipose and bone tissue, we wanted to evaluate the involvement of WNT10B, a Wnt pathway activator, in adipogenesis and osteoblastogenesis in humans. Genetic association between WNT10B polymorphisms and adiposity parameters as well as bone mineral density (BMD) measurements was analysed in two independent populations. The first is a population of 1,228 Danish men (702 aged 20-29 years; 532 aged 60-74 years) from the Odense Androgen Study (OAS), which was designed as a cross-sectional, population-based study. The second population, called SIBLOS, includes 922 Belgian men (34 ± 5 years old) and contains siblings selected from over 500 families. Four tagSNPs (rs833840, rs833841, rs10875902 and rs4018511) that capture variation of ten SNPs (MAF > 5 %) in a 15.2 kb region spanning the WNT10B gene and its flanking regions were genotyped. Although no association with body mass index was found, we found all tagSNPs to be associated with BMD parameters (BMD whole body, total hip and femoral neck) and height in the OAS population. The association of rs10875902 was most prominent (nominal p = 0.012) and confirmed a previously shown negative effect on BMD. No significant associations were observed in the SIBLOS population. In the present study, no association between WNT10B polymorphisms and adiposity parameters was found. However, our results clearly illustrate a role for WNT10B variants in determining human BMD. The effect of WNT10B polymorphisms on height should be evaluated in additional populations.
PubMed ID
23325361 View in PubMed
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Heart valve disease among patients with hyperprolactinemia: a nationwide population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126156
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 May;97(5):1629-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Charlotte Steffensen
Merete Lund Maegbaek
Peter Laurberg
Marianne Andersen
Caroline Micheala Nervil Kistorp
Helene Norrelund
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Jens Otto Lunde Jorgensen
Author Affiliation
Medical Department MEA, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8000 Aarhus C, Denmark.
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 May;97(5):1629-34
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Valve Diseases - complications - epidemiology - surgery
Humans
Hyperprolactinemia - complications - epidemiology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
Increased risk of heart valve disease during treatment with certain dopamine agonists, such as cabergoline, has been observed in patients with Parkinson's disease. The same compound is used to treat hyperprolactinemia, but it is unknown whether this also associates with heart valve disease.
The objective of the study was to assess the incidence of diagnosed heart valve disease and cardiac valve surgery among patients with hyperprolactinemia, compared with a general population cohort in Denmark.
This was a nationwide, population-based, cohort study based on a nationwide hospital registry.
We identified 2381 hyperprolactinemia patients with a first-time diagnosis recorded from 1994 through 2010 in the registry, with no previous hospital diagnosis of heart valve disease. Each patient was compared with 10 age- and gender-matched comparison cohort members from the general population. The association between hyperprolactinemia and heart valve disease was analyzed with Cox's proportional hazards regression, controlling for potential confounding factors. To assess the risk of cardiac valve surgery and avoid ascertainment bias, a subanalysis was made in a cohort of 2,387 hyperprolactinemia patients with no previous cardiac valve surgery and 23,870 comparison cohort members.
Nineteen hyperprolactinemic patients (0.80%) were diagnosed with heart valve disease during a total of 17,759.8 yr of follow-up, compared with 75 persons (0.31%) in the comparison cohort during 179,940.6 yr of follow-up [adjusted hazard ratio 2.27 (95% confidence interval 1.35-3.82)]. Seven of the 10 patients treated with cabergoline and diagnosed with heart valve disease were asymptomatic and diagnosed on the basis of an echocardiography performed as a safety measure. However, only two patients with hyperprolactinemia (0.08%) underwent surgery, compared with 28 persons in the general population cohort (0.12%) [adjusted hazard ratio 0.55 (95% confidence interval 0.13-2.42)].
Data from the present register-based study do not support that hyperprolactinemia or its treatment is associated with an increased risk of clinically significant heart valve disease.
PubMed ID
22419729 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.