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Alcohol and coronary heart disease risk--is there an unknown confounder?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173661
Source
Addiction. 2005 Aug;100(8):1150-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Kari Poikolainen
Jussi Vahtera
Marianna Virtanen
Anne Linna
Mika Kivimäki
Author Affiliation
Finnish Foundation for Alcohol Studies, Helsinki, Finland. kari.poikolainen@stakes.fi
Source
Addiction. 2005 Aug;100(8):1150-7
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Abstract
To evaluate whether confounding by several known or suspected coronary heart disease risk factors are likely to explain the lower coronary heart disease risk among light alcohol drinkers compared with never-drinkers.
A population-based cross-sectional study.
Hypertension, body mass index (BMI), diabetes, depression, sleep disturbances, smoking, physical activity, life satisfaction, psychological distress, trait anxiety, independent and dependent life events, length of working hours, job control, job strain and effort-reward imbalance were compared between never-drinkers and light drinkers (
PubMed ID
16042645 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use and sickness absence due to all causes and mental- or musculoskeletal disorders: a nationally representative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291833
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 01 17; 18(1):152
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-17-2018
Author
Leena Kaila-Kangas
Aki Koskinen
Päivi Leino-Arjas
Marianna Virtanen
Tommi Härkänen
Tea Lallukka
Author Affiliation
Work ability and working careers, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, PL 40, 00251, Helsinki, Finland. leena.kaila-kangas@ttl.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2018 01 17; 18(1):152
Date
01-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have not distinguished between different alcohol-use histories, which could have contributed to the current inconsistent evidence regarding the relationship between alcohol use and subsequent sickness absence. We thus examined alcohol use and subsequent diagnosis-specific sickness absence in groups with different levels of alcohol use, as well as in lifelong abstainers, former drinkers, and people with clinical alcohol use disorders.
The data of the population-based Health 2000 Survey (BRIF8901) of 3666 Finns aged 30-55 were linked with national registers on medically certified sickness absences lasting for >?10 working days (long-term) for all causes (2000?-?2010) and for mental or musculoskeletal disorders (2004-2010), as well as with registers on pensions and death (2000-2010). Alcohol use was assessed by questionnaire. Chronic somatic diseases were evaluated at baseline in a clinical examination, and common mental and alcohol use disorders using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Cox regression analyses were conducted with censoring for death and retirement from work.
During an average 10-year follow-up, 56.0% of the participants had at least one long-term sickness absence period. Compared with light drinkers, those having an alcohol use disorder had increased risk of all-cause sickness absence (HR?=?1.27; 95% CI?=?1.04?-?1.54) and sickness absence due to mental disorders (HR?=?2.16; 95% CI?=?1.39?-?3.35), when somatic and mental disorders as well as demographic, lifestyle-related and occupational factors at baseline were accounted for. Lifelong abstainers did not differ from light drinkers. Also high-volume drinking (HR?=?1.52; 95% CI 1.03?-?2.25) and former drinking (HR?=?1.57; 95% CI?=?1.15?-?2.15) were associated with long-term sickness absence due to mental disorders. Alcohol use was not predictive of sickness absence due to musculoskeletal disorders.
These results highlight the need to distinguish between former drinking and lifelong abstinence, as only former drinking was associated with sickness absence. Alcohol use disorder and high-volume drinking were strongly predictive of sickness absence due to mental disorders. Identifying people with excessive alcohol use e.g. in occupational health care, and mapping and supporting their mental health may help in preventing sickness absences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29343233 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant use before and after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: a longitudinal modeling study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144431
Source
Diabetes Care. 2010 Jul;33(7):1471-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Mika Kivimäki
Adam G Tabák
Debbie A Lawlor
G David Batty
Archana Singh-Manoux
Markus Jokela
Marianna Virtanen
Paula Salo
Tuula Oksanen
Jaana Pentti
Daniel R Witte
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK. m.kivimaki@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Diabetes Care. 2010 Jul;33(7):1471-6
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder - drug therapy - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - psychology
Odds Ratio
Risk factors
Abstract
To examine antidepressant use before and after the diagnosis of diabetes.
This study was a longitudinal analysis of diabetic and nondiabetic groups selected from a prospective cohort study of 151,618 men and women in Finland (the Finnish Public Sector Study, 1995-2005). We analyzed the use of antidepressants in those 493 individuals who developed type 2 diabetes and their 2,450 matched nondiabetic control subjects for each year during a period covering 4 years before and 4 years after the diagnosis. For comparison, we undertook a corresponding analysis on 748 individuals who developed cancer and their 3,730 matched control subjects.
In multilevel longitudinal models, the odds ratio for antidepressant use in those who developed diabetes was 2.00 (95% CI 1.57-2.55) times greater than that in nondiabetic subjects. The relative difference in antidepressant use between these groups was similar before and after the diabetes diagnosis except for a temporary peak in antidepressant use at the year of the diagnosis (OR 2.66 [95% CI 1.94-3.65]). In incident cancer case subjects, antidepressant use substantially increased after the cancer diagnosis, demonstrating that our analysis was sensitive for detecting long-term changes in antidepressant trajectories when they existed.
Awareness of the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes may temporarily increase the risk of depressive symptoms. Further research is needed to determine whether more prevalent use of antidepressants noted before the diagnosis of diabetes relates to effects of depression, side effects of antidepressant use, or a common causal pathway for depression and diabetes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20368411 View in PubMed
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Association Between Unstable Work and Occupational Wellbeing Among Artists in Finland: Results of a Psychosocial Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275901
Source
Med Probl Perform Art. 2016 Jun;31(2):104-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Katinka Tuisku
Pia Houni
Johanna Seppänen
Marianna Virtanen
Source
Med Probl Perform Art. 2016 Jun;31(2):104-9
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Burnout, Professional - psychology
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Health status
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Music - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance - psychology
Workload - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Although artistic work is in transition, the occupational wellbeing of artists has been less studied than wellbeing among other workers. This study aimed to explore the relationship between work characteristics and occupational (psychosocial) wellbeing of artists.
A national questionnaire was sent to all artists (theatre artists, writers, and visual artists) reached by four major labor unions in Finland. Type of employment (permanent full-time work vs other), working field (own field of art vs other), regularity of working hours (regular vs irregular), and control of workload were assessed. The wellbeing outcomes were work engagement, recovery from work, and experience of stress and low mood.
Full-time permanent employment, regular working hours, and working in one's own field of art were positively associated with work engagement. Furthermore, regular working hours were positively associated with recovery and negatively associated with subjective report of low mood. Ability to control workload was positively associated with recovery and negatively associated with stress and low mood. Higher age was associated with lower stress and better recovery.
Artists with regular working hours, secure employment, ability to control workload, working in one's own field of art, and higher age reported better wellbeing in this study. The late stages of career appear to guarantee more stability and wellbeing than the more insecure beginning of a career.
PubMed ID
27281381 View in PubMed
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Association of contractual and subjective job insecurity with sickness presenteeism among public sector employees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141949
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;52(8):830-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Tarja Heponiemi
Marko Elovainio
Jaana Pentti
Marianna Virtanen
Hugo Westerlund
Pekka Virtanen
Tuula Oksanen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Author Affiliation
Service System Research Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. tarja.heponiemi@thl.fi
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;52(8):830-5
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment
Faculty
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Occupational Health
Personnel Management - statistics & numerical data
Public Sector - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the associations of contractual job insecurity (fixed-term vs permanent employment contract) and subjectively assessed job insecurity with sickness presenteeism among those who had no sickness absences during the study year.
Survey data from a sample of 18,454 Public sector employees were gathered in 2004 (the Finnish Public Sector study).
Fixed-term employees were less likely to report working while ill (odds ratio = 0.88, 95% confidence interval = 0.77 to 0.99) than permanent employees. Subjective insecurity was associated with higher levels of working while ill, and this association was stronger among older employees. These results remained after adjustments for demographics, health-related variables, and optimism.
Our results suggest that subjective job insecurity might be even more important than contractual insecurity when a public sector employee makes the decision to go to work despite feeling ill.
PubMed ID
20657303 View in PubMed
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Association of physical activity with future mental health in older, mid-life and younger women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263892
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Oct;24(5):813-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Amanda Griffiths
Anne Kouvonen
Jaana Pentti
Tuula Oksanen
Marianna Virtanen
Paula Salo
Ari Väänänen
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2014 Oct;24(5):813-8
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Exercise - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Style
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Mental ill-health, particularly depression and anxiety, is a leading and increasing cause of disability worldwide, especially for women.
We examined the prospective association between physical activity and symptoms of mental ill-health in younger, mid-life and older working women. Participants were 26 913 women from the ongoing cohort Finnish Public Sector Study with complete data at two phases, excluding those who screened positive for mental ill-health at baseline. Mental health was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. Self-reported physical activity was expressed in metabolic equivalent task (MET) hours per week. Logistic regression models were used to analyse associations between physical activity levels and subsequent mental health.
There was an inverse dose-response relationship between physical activity and future symptoms of mental ill-health. This association is consistent with a protective effect of physical activity and remained after adjustments for socio-demographic, work-related and lifestyle factors, health and body mass index. Furthermore, those mid-life and older women who reported increased physical activity by more than 2 MET hours per week demonstrated a reduced risk of later mental ill-health in comparison with those who did not increase physical activity. This protective effect of increased physical activity did not hold for younger women.
This study adds to the evidence for the protective effect of physical activity for later mental health in women. It also suggests that increasing physical activity levels may be beneficial in terms of mental health among mid-life and older women. The alleviation of menopausal symptoms may partly explain age effects but further research is required.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24532567 View in PubMed
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Association of pupil vandalism, bullying and truancy with teachers' absence due to illness: a multilevel analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123851
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2012 Jun;50(3):347-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jenni Ervasti
Mika Kivimäki
Riikka Puusniekka
Pauliina Luopa
Jaana Pentti
Sakari Suominen
Jussi Vahtera
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. jenni.ervasti@ttl.fi
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2012 Jun;50(3):347-61
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Bullying
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Faculty - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Student Dropouts
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine whether vandalism, bullying, and truancy among pupils at school are associated with absence due to illness among teachers. Data on such problem behaviour of 17,033 pupils in 90 schools were linked to absence records of 2364 teachers. Pupil reported vandalism and bullying at the school-level were associated with teachers' short-term (1- to 3-day) absences. Cumulative exposure to various forms of pupils' problem behaviour was associated with even higher rates of short-term absences among teachers. No association was found between pupils' problem behaviour and teachers' long-term (>3-day) absences. In conclusion, there seems to be a link between pupils' problem behaviour and teachers' short-term absence due to illness. Further work should determine whether problem behaviour is a cause or a consequence of absences or whether the association is noncausal.
PubMed ID
22656077 View in PubMed
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The association of social support at work and in private life with mental health and antidepressant use: the Health 2000 Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155538
Source
J Affect Disord. 2009 May;115(1-2):36-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2009
Author
Marjo Sinokki
Katariina Hinkka
Kirsi Ahola
Seppo Koskinen
Mika Kivimäki
Teija Honkonen
Pauli Puukka
Timo Klaukka
Jouko Lönnqvist
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Lemminkäisenkatu 14-18 B, FI-20520 Turku, Finland. marjo.sinokki@utu.fi
Source
J Affect Disord. 2009 May;115(1-2):36-45
Date
May-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Adjustment
Social Support
Socioeconomic Factors
Statistics as Topic
Abstract
Social support is assumed to protect mental health, but it is not known whether low social support at work increases the risk of common mental disorders or antidepressant medication. This study, carried out in Finland 2000-2003, examined the associations of low social support at work and in private life with DSM-IV depressive and anxiety disorders and subsequent antidepressant medication.
Social support was measured with self-assessment scales in a cohort of 3429 employees from a population-based health survey. A 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders was examined with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI), which encompasses operationalized criteria for DSM-IV diagnoses and allows the estimation of DSM-IV diagnoses for major mental disorders. Purchases of antidepressants in a 3-year follow-up were collected from the nationwide pharmaceutical register of the Social Insurance Institution.
Low social support at work and in private life was associated with a 12-month prevalence of depressive or anxiety disorders (adjusted odds ratio 2.02, 95% CI 1.48-2.82 for supervisory support, 1.65, 95% CI 1.05-2.59 for colleague support, and 1.62, 95% CI 1.12-2.36 for private life support). Work-related social support was also associated with subsequent antidepressant use.
This study used a cross-sectional analysis of DSM-IV mental disorders. The use of purchases of antidepressant as an indicator of depressive and anxiety disorders can result in an underestimation of the actual mental disorders.
Low social support, both at work and in private life, is associated with DSM-IV mental disorders, and low social support at work is also a risk factor for mental disorders treated with antidepressant medication.
PubMed ID
18722019 View in PubMed
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The association of social support at work and in private life with sleeping problems in the Finnish health 2000 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146346
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Jan;52(1):54-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Marjo Sinokki
Kirsi Ahola
Katariina Hinkka
Mikael Sallinen
Mikko Härmä
Pauli Puukka
Timo Klaukka
Jouko Lönnqvist
Marianna Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Turku Centre for Occupational Health, Turku, Finland. marjo.sinokki@utu.fi
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Jan;52(1):54-61
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dyssomnias - drug therapy - etiology
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications - etiology
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the associations of social support at work and in private life with sleeping problems and use of sleep medication.
In the nationwide Health 2000 Study, with a cohort of 3430 employees, social support at work and in private life, and sleep-related issues were assessed with self-assessment scales. Purchases of sleep medication over a 3-year period were collected from the nationwide pharmaceutical register of the Social Insurance Institution.
Low social support from supervisor was associated with tiredness (odds ratio [OR] 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.26 to 2.23) and sleeping difficulties within the previous month (OR 1.74, 95% CI = 1.41 to 1.92). Low support from coworkers was associated with tiredness (OR 1.55, 95% CI = 1.41 to 1.92), sleeping difficulties within the previous month (OR 1.77, 95% CI = 1.32 to 2.36), and only among women, with short sleep duration (OR 2.06, 95% CI = 1.22 to 3.47). Low private life support was associated with short sleep duration (OR 1.49, 95% CI = 1.13 to 1.98) and among women, with sleeping difficulties (OR 1.46, 95% CI = 1.08 to 1.33).
Low social support, especially at work, is associated with sleeping-related problems.
PubMed ID
20042884 View in PubMed
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Attachment to employment and education before work disability pension due to a mental disorder among young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278026
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 May 13;16:143
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-2016
Author
Pauliina Mattila-Holappa
Matti Joensuu
Kirsi Ahola
Jussi Vahtera
Marianna Virtanen
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2016 May 13;16:143
Date
May-13-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Disabled Persons - psychology
Educational Status
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Pensions
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined attachment to employment and education among young adults before they were granted a fixed-term work disability pension due to psychiatric diagnosis, and the factors associated with this attachment.
The data comprised all persons aged 18-34 who received a new-onset fixed-term disability pension compensation due to a mental disorder in Finland in 2008 (N?=?1163). The data were derived from pension applications and the enclosed medical records, and were linked to employment records from a period of three years before the disability pension. We analysed the factors associated with attachment to employment or education with log-binomial regression analysis.
Fifty percent of the participants were attached to employment or education before work disability pension. The attached were more often women; had higher basic and vocational education; had mood disorder rather than psychosis diagnosis as a primary diagnosis; and had no record of harmful alcohol use or drug use, or recorded symptoms of mental disorders already at school-age.
The level of attachment to employment or education before work disability pension is low among young adults with mental disorders and several risk factors predict poor attachment; severe or comorbid mental disorder, early-life psychiatric morbidity, substance use, male sex, low basic education, and lacking vocational education.
Notes
Cites: J Affect Disord. 2012 Dec 20;143(1-3):16-2622763038
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