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Upper palaeolithic and late stone age human diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173462
Source
J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci. 2005 Jul;24(4):433-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Maria V Dobrovolskaya
Author Affiliation
Institute of Archaeology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. mk_pa@mail.ru
Source
J Physiol Anthropol Appl Human Sci. 2005 Jul;24(4):433-8
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Calcium - analysis
Carbon Isotopes - analysis
Diet
Female
Fossils
Humans
Male
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Nitrogen Isotopes - analysis
Paleontology
Russia
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Abstract
Undoubtedly modern mankind is an omnivorous species. Nevertheless, types of diet changed at the time of anthropogenesis. The Upper Palaeolithic period is the crucial time because of the appearance of anatomically modern humans in Europe. The main goal in this period investigation is to find the Neanderthal man-Upper Palaeolithic man diet distinction. A sharp early Holocene rise in humidity and temperature and melting of the permafrost resulted in the complete destruction of traditional migration routes, campsite losses, and the flora and fauna of inland territories changing. All these factors affected nutrition patterns, too. The comparison of the different Mesolithic and Neolithic groups' diet patterns allow us to discuss problems of the influence of cultural and ecological factors. The bone tissue chemical concentrations (Ca, Zn, Sr, Cu) from Upper Palaeolithic, Mesolithic and Neolithic burials are considered to reconstruct individual and group patterns of nutrition. The results of the atomic absorption method were used.
PubMed ID
16079593 View in PubMed
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