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Clarithromycin for stable coronary heart disease increases all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and cerebrovascular morbidity over 10years in the CLARICOR randomised, blinded clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268775
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015 Mar 1;182:459-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2015
Author
Per Winkel
Jørgen Hilden
Jørgen Fischer Hansen
Jens Kastrup
Hans Jørn Kolmos
Erik Kjøller
Gorm Boje Jensen
Maria Skoog
Jane Lindschou
Christian Gluud
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2015 Mar 1;182:459-65
Date
Mar-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cause of Death - trends
Clarithromycin - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Coronary Artery Disease - drug therapy - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Morbidity - trends
Retrospective Studies
Single-Blind Method
Stroke - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
The CLARICOR trial reported that clarithromycin compared with placebo increased all-cause mortality in patients with stable coronary heart disease. This study investigates the effects of clarithromycin versus placebo during 10years follow up.
The CLARICOR trial is a randomised, placebo-controlled trial including 4373 patients with stable coronary heart disease. The interventions were 2weeks of clarithromycin 500mg a day versus placebo. 10year follow up was performed through Danish public registers and analysed with Cox regression.
Clarithromycin increased all-cause mortality (hazard ratio (HR): 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.00-1.21) and cerebrovascular disease during 10years (HR: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.38). The increased mortality and morbidity were restricted to patients not on statin at entry (HR: 1.16, 95% CI: 1.04-1.31, and HR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.03-1.50). The assumption of constant HR during the 10years was violated for cardiovascular death (P=0.01) and cardiovascular death outside hospital (P
PubMed ID
25602299 View in PubMed
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