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Antibiotic resistance patterns of bacteria causing urinary tract infections in the elderly living in nursing homes versus the elderly living at home: an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269775
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:98
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mark Fagan
Morten Lindbæk
Nils Grude
Harald Reiso
Maria Romøren
Dagfinn Skaare
Dag Berild
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2015;15:98
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary - classification - pharmacology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Escherichia coli - drug effects
Escherichia coli Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Homes for the Aged - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Proteus Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Proteus mirabilis - drug effects
Sex Factors
Urinalysis - methods
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Antibiotic resistance is a problem in nursing homes. Presumed urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common infection. This study examines urine culture results from elderly patients to see if specific guidelines based on gender or whether the patient resides in a nursing home (NH) are warranted.
This is a cross sectional observation study comparing urine cultures from NH patients with urine cultures from patients in the same age group living in the community.
There were 232 positive urine cultures in the NH group and 3554 in the community group. Escherichia coli was isolated in 145 urines in the NH group (64%) and 2275 (64%) in the community group. There were no clinically significant differences in resistance. Combined, there were 3016 positive urine cultures from females and 770 from males. Escherichia coli was significantly more common in females 2120 (70%) than in males 303 (39%) (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
26238248 View in PubMed
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Chlamydia testing in practice - requisitioners and patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287779
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 10 17;137(19)
Publication Type
Article
Date
10-17-2017
Author
Maria Romøren
Dagfinn Skaare
Nils Grude
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2017 10 17;137(19)
Date
10-17-2017
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Female
General Practice - statistics & numerical data
Gynecology - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Private Practice - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Secondary Care - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Unnecessary Procedures
Urinalysis - statistics & numerical data
Vaginal Smears - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Optimising the diagnostic work-up and treatment of genital chlamydia infection requires knowledge of the sampling patterns of those who order chlamydia tests. We wished to determine which groups of doctors collect specimens for chlamydia testing, and to examine the sex and age distribution of patients tested, and the proportion of positive tests, from general practitioners, gynaecologists in private practice, and youth health services.
The study includes 43 465 specimens analysed for genital infection with Chlamydia trachomatis at Vestfold Hospital Trust over the period 1 January 2007 to 31 December 2011. Data from the laboratory information system were used to classify the test requisitioners.
General practitioners requisitioned 60 % of all chlamydia tests and 63 % of all positive tests. Youth health services requisitioned 13 % of all tests and 22 % of positive tests; gynaecologists in private practice, 12 % of all tests and 5 % of positive tests. Overall, 26 % of specimens were from women over the age of 30 with 2.2 % testing positive, and 82 % of these specimens were submitted by general practitioners or gynaecologists in private practice. Twenty-three per cent of specimens were from men, and 78 % of these were collected in general practice.
Knowledge of who requisitions chlamydia testing and of whom is important for planning and improving chlamydia diagnosis, treatment and contact tracing. In this study from Norway, we found that doctors in general practice play a key role in diagnosing and treating chlamydia. The testing of women over the age of 30 by general practitioners and gynaecologists in private practice probably leads to unnecessary use of resources and should be reduced.
PubMed ID
29043753 View in PubMed
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Ethical problems related to intravenous fluids in nursing homes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274177
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2014 Dec;21(8):890-901
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
May-Elin T Horntvedt
Maria Romøren
Betty-Ann Solvoll
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2014 Dec;21(8):890-901
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Ethics, Nursing
Focus Groups
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous - ethics
Norway
Nursing Homes - ethics
Qualitative Research
Abstract
Intravenous fluids and/or antibiotics are applied to only a limited extent in Norwegian nursing homes, and the patients are often sent to hospital in these situations. A transfer and a stay in hospital may be unnecessary strains for frail older patients. Given this background, a collaborative research project was initiated in a Norwegian county in 2009. A teaching programme was developed, which aimed to strengthen the awareness of ethics, assessments and practical procedures related to intravenous fluid and/or antibiotics among healthcare professionals.
This qualitative study aimed to increase our knowledge of the ethical problems experienced by nursing home nurses in situations related to the administration of intravenous fluids and/or antibiotics.
An exploratory design was used, and five focus group interviews were conducted with 26 registered nurses. A hermeneutic analytic approach was applied.
This study was reported to the Norwegian Social Science Data Services in May 2010. The Regional Committee for Medical and Health Research Ethics approved the collaborative research project.
The analysis showed that the nurses experienced difficult decision-making situations, which were interpreted as external pressure and internal pressure. External pressure emerged in interactions with patients and relatives. Organizational factors were also interpreted as external pressure. Internal pressure was interpreted as the nurses' experience of feeling inadequate in situations where it was difficult to protect the dignity of patients.
These findings correspond with international studies, which show that ethical problems often arise during decision-making situations.
In agreement with the definition of an ethical problem, we found that the nurses experienced uncertainty and disagreements about how situations should be managed. External and internal pressures related to intravenous fluids and/or antibiotics in nursing homes have not been reported in previous studies. Thus, these findings merit further exploration.
PubMed ID
24644253 View in PubMed
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How do nursing home doctors involve patients and next of kin in end-of-life decisions? A qualitative study from Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279431
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2016 Jan 14;17:5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-14-2016
Author
Maria Romøren
Reidar Pedersen
Reidun Førde
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2016 Jan 14;17:5
Date
Jan-14-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advance Care Planning
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Decision Making
Dissent and Disputes
Ethics, Medical
Family
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Life Support Care
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Homes - ethics
Patient Rights
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians - ethics
Professional-Family Relations
Qualitative Research
Terminal Care - ethics
Young Adult
Abstract
Ethically challenging critical events and decisions are common in nursing homes. This paper presents nursing home doctors' descriptions of how they include the patient and next of kin in end-of-life decisions.
We performed ten focus groups with 30 nursing home doctors. Advance care planning; aspects of decisions on life-prolonging treatment, and conflict with next of kin were subject to in-depth analysis and condensation.
The doctors described large variations in attitudes and practices in all aspects of end-of-life decisions. In conflict situations, many doctors were more concerned about the opinion of next of kin than ensuring the patient's best interest.
Many end-of-life decisions appear arbitrary or influenced by factors independent of the individual patient's values and interests and are not based on systematic ethical reflections. To protect patient autonomy in nursing homes, stronger emphasis on legal and ethical knowledge among nursing home doctors is needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26769024 View in PubMed
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Pregnancy outcome after gestational exposure to erythromycin - a population-based register study from Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125659
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2012 Dec;74(6):1053-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Maria Romøren
Morten Lindbæk
Hedvig Nordeng
Author Affiliation
Department of General Practice, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. maria.romoren@medisin.uio.no
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2012 Dec;74(6):1053-62
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Drug-Induced - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Erythromycin - adverse effects
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - chemically induced
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy Trimester, First - drug effects
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Erythromycin is a macrolide antibiotic indicated for respiratory tract infections, genital chlamydia and skin infections. It has recently been suggested that erythromycin use in the first trimester of pregnancy can increase the risk of congenital cardiovascular malformations. This study aimed to determine whether erythromycin exposure in the first trimester is associated with cardiovascular or other malformations.
We studied 180 120 women in Norway who were pregnant during 2004-2007. Data on all live births stillbirths and induced abortions after 12 gestational weeks from The Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN) were linked to information from the Norwegian prescription database (NorPD). We compared the pregnancy outcomes of women who had taken erythromycin (n= 1786, 1.0%), penicillin V (n= 4921, 2.7%) or amoxicillin (n= 1599, 0.9%) in their first trimester with outcomes of women who had not taken any systemic antibiotics (n= 163 653, 90.9%) during this period.
The risk of cardiovascular malformations was not significantly different with or without exposure to erythromycin in the first trimester (adjusted OR = 1.2 [95% CI 0.8, 1.8]) or in the most vulnerable period of heart formation (adjusted OR = 1.6 [95% CI 0.9-3.0]). Sub-analyses showed that the risk for any specific malformations was not increased with erythromycin, macrolides, penicillin V or amoxicillin compared with no antibiotic use in first trimester.
This large, population-based register study did not find that exposure to erythromycin or macrolides in the first trimester of pregnancy was associated with fetal cardiovascular or other malformations. These results suggest that the risk of erythromycin use during early pregnancy, if any, is low.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22463376 View in PubMed
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Psychoactive substance use among patients admitted to an acute psychiatric ward: Laboratory findings and associations with clinical characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100141
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Nov 3;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-2010
Author
Jon Mordal
Bjørn Holm
Michael Gossop
Maria Romøren
Jørg Mørland
Jørgen G Bramness
Author Affiliation
Psychiatric Department, Lovisenberg Diakonale Hospital, Lovisenberggt. 17, 0440 Oslo, Norway, and Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2010 Nov 3;
Date
Nov-3-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Background: Estimates of psychoactive substance use among acutely admitted psychiatric patients vary among studies, and few have used comprehensive laboratory methods. Aims: This study used chromatography-based analyses of blood and urine to identify the rates of substance use among acute psychiatric admissions, and to study the associations with socio-demographic variables, clinical characteristics and patients' reports of symptoms, substance use and need for treatment. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2006/2007 in Oslo, Norway. Blood and urine samples were collected from 298 acute psychiatric admissions and extensively analysed for alcohol, medicinal and illicit drugs. Psychotic symptoms were assessed with the positive subscale of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Patient self-report questionnaires included the Alcohol and Drug Use Disorder Identification Tests. Patients were also asked if they needed professional help for substance use. Results: Psychoactive substances were detected in 63% of the 298 admissions, medicinal drugs in 46%, alcohol in 12% and illicit drugs in 28%. Patients using alcohol had a high suicidal risk score at admission and the shortest length of stay (median 1 day). Use of illicit drugs was associated with psychotic symptoms and readmission. Self-report questionnaires indicated harmful use of alcohol for half of the patients and of other substances for one-third. A need for professional help for substance use was reported by one-third of patients. Conclusion: Given the high rates of substance use and the important clinical associations, drug screening seems warranted in acute psychiatric settings. Interventions designed for substance-using patients should be developed and integrated.
PubMed ID
21047195 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.