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Associations among 25-year trends in diet, cholesterol and BMI from 140,000 observations in men and women in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123566
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Ingegerd Johansson
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Stegmayr
Kurt Boman
Göran Hallmans
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. ingegerd.johansson@odont.umu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - trends
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - adverse effects
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Diet, Reducing - adverse effects - trends
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mass Media - trends
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
In the 1970s, men in northern Sweden had among the highest prevalences of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) worldwide. An intervention program combining population- and individual-oriented activities was initiated in 1985. Concurrently, collection of information on medical risk factors, lifestyle and anthropometry started. Today, these data make up one of the largest databases in the world on diet intake in a population-based sample, both in terms of sample size and follow-up period. The study examines trends in food and nutrient intake, serum cholesterol and body mass index (BMI) from 1986 to 2010 in northern Sweden.
Cross-sectional information on self-reported food and nutrient intake and measured body weight, height, and serum cholesterol were compiled for over 140,000 observations. Trends and trend breaks over the 25-year period were evaluated for energy-providing nutrients, foods contributing to fat intake, serum cholesterol and BMI.
Reported intake of fat exhibited two significant trend breaks in both sexes: a decrease between 1986 and 1992 and an increase from 2002 (women) or 2004 (men). A reverse trend was noted for carbohydrates, whereas protein intake remained unchanged during the 25-year period. Significant trend breaks in intake of foods contributing to total fat intake were seen. Reported intake of wine increased sharply for both sexes (more so for women) and export beer increased for men. BMI increased continuously for both sexes, whereas serum cholesterol levels decreased during 1986 - 2004, remained unchanged until 2007 and then began to rise. The increase in serum cholesterol coincided with the increase in fat intake, especially with intake of saturated fat and fats for spreading on bread and cooking.
Men and women in northern Sweden decreased their reported fat intake in the first 7 years (1986-1992) of an intervention program. After 2004 fat intake increased sharply for both genders, which coincided with introduction of a positive media support for low carbohydrate-high-fat (LCHF) diet. The decrease and following increase in cholesterol levels occurred simultaneously with the time trends in food selection, whereas a constant increase in BMI remained unaltered. These changes in risk factors may have important effects on primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Notes
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PubMed ID
22686621 View in PubMed
Less detail

Carbon footprint of telemedicine solutions--unexplored opportunity for reducing carbon emissions in the health sector.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262422
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105040
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Asa Holmner
Kristie L Ebi
Lutfan Lazuardi
Maria Nilsson
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e105040
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Footprint - economics - statistics & numerical data
Climate Change - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Delivery of Health Care - economics
Health Care Sector - economics
Hospitals, University
Humans
Sweden
Telemedicine - economics
Travel - economics
Videoconferencing - economics
Abstract
The healthcare sector is a significant contributor to global carbon emissions, in part due to extensive travelling by patients and health workers.
To evaluate the potential of telemedicine services based on videoconferencing technology to reduce travelling and thus carbon emissions in the healthcare sector.
A life cycle inventory was performed to evaluate the carbon reduction potential of telemedicine activities beyond a reduction in travel related emissions. The study included two rehabilitation units at Umeå University Hospital in Sweden. Carbon emissions generated during telemedicine appointments were compared with care-as-usual scenarios. Upper and lower bound emissions scenarios were created based on different teleconferencing solutions and thresholds for when telemedicine becomes favorable were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to pinpoint the most important contributors to emissions for different set-ups and use cases.
Replacing physical visits with telemedicine appointments resulted in a significant 40-70 times decrease in carbon emissions. Factors such as meeting duration, bandwidth and use rates influence emissions to various extents. According to the lower bound scenario, telemedicine becomes a greener choice at a distance of a few kilometers when the alternative is transport by car.
Telemedicine is a potent carbon reduction strategy in the health sector. But to contribute significantly to climate change mitigation, a paradigm shift might be required where telemedicine is regarded as an essential component of ordinary health care activities and not only considered to be a service to the few who lack access to care due to geography, isolation or other constraints.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25188322 View in PubMed
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Changing patterns of tobacco use in a middle-aged population: the role of snus, gender, age, and education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133537
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Margareta Norberg
Gunnar Lundqvist
Maria Nilsson
Hans Gilljam
Lars Weinehall
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Sweden. margareta.norberg@epiph.umu.se
Source
Glob Health Action. 2011;4
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology
Tobacco, Smokeless
Abstract
In Sweden, the smoking prevalence has declined. In 2007, it was among the lowest in the industrialized world. A steady increase in the use of Swedish oral moist snuff, snus, has occurred in parallel. This development is neither solicited by authorities nor the medical establishment, but rather has occurred along with increased awareness of the dangers of smoking, and has been promoted by product development and marketing of snus.
To evaluate time trends in patterns of tobacco use in northern Sweden during 1990-2007.
Cross-sectional (99,381 subjects) and longitudinal (26,867 subjects) data from the Västerbotten Intervention Programme (VIP) 1990-2007 were analyzed. All adults in Västerbotten County are invited to a VIP health examination at ages 40, 50, and 60 years, and until 1995 also 30 years. Smoking and use of snus were evaluated by gender, age and educational groups. Intermittent smoking was categorized as smoking.
From the period 1990-1995 to the period 2002-2007, smoking prevalence decreased from 26 to 16% among men and from 27 to 18% among women. The differences in prevalence increased between educational groups. The decline in smoking was less and the increase of snus use was greater among those with basic education. The use of snus among basic-educated 40-year-olds reached 35% among men and 14% among women during 2002-2007. Dual smoking and snus use increased among men and women with basic education. Smoking without snus use was more prevalent among women. Gender differences in total smoking prevalence (smoking only plus dual use) were small in all age groups, but increased among those with basic education reaching 7.3% during 2002-2007, with women being more frequent smokers. Smoking prevalences were similar among never, former and current snus users. Among the 30,000 former smokers, 38% of men and 64% of women had never used snus. Longitudinal data showed a decline in total tobacco use from baseline until follow-up and this was mainly due to a smoking cessation rate of
Notes
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PubMed ID
21695071 View in PubMed
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Coffee consumption and risk of rare cancers in Scandinavian countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297621
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 03; 33(3):287-302
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Marko Lukic
Lena Maria Nilsson
Guri Skeie
Bernt Lindahl
Tonje Braaten
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsö, Norway. marko.lukic@uit.no.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 03; 33(3):287-302
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Caffeine - administration & dosage
Coffee - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Studies on the association between heavy coffee consumption and risk of less frequently diagnosed cancers are scarce. We aimed to quantify the association between filtered, boiled, and total coffee consumption and the risk of bladder, esophageal, kidney, pancreatic, and stomach cancers. We used data from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study and the Northern Sweden Health and Disease Study. Information on coffee consumption was available for 193,439 participants. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the investigated cancer sites by category of total, filtered, and boiled coffee consumption. Heavy filtered coffee consumers (= 4 cups/day) had a multivariable adjusted HR of 0.74 of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer (95% CI 0.57-0.95) when compared with light filtered coffee consumers (= 1 cup/day). We did not observe significant associations between total or boiled coffee consumption and any of the investigated cancer sites, neither in the entire study sample nor in analyses stratified by sex. We found an increased risk of bladder cancer among never smokers who were heavy filtered or total coffee consumers, and an increased risk of stomach cancer in never smokers who were heavy boiled coffee consumers. Our data suggest that increased filtered coffee consumption might reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find evidence of an association between coffee consumption and the risk of esophageal or kidney cancer. The increased risk of bladder and stomach cancer was confined to never smokers.
PubMed ID
29476356 View in PubMed
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Consumption of filtered and boiled coffee and the risk of incident cancer: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143206
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1533-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
Ingegerd Johansson
Per Lenner
Bernt Lindahl
Bethany Van Guelpen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. lena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2010 Oct;21(10):1533-44
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coffee
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Cooking
Drinking
Female
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Despite potentially relevant chemical differences between filtered and boiled coffee, this study is the first to investigate consumption in relation to the risk of incident cancer.
Subjects were from the Västerbotten Intervention Project (64,603 participants, including 3,034 cases), with up to 15 years of follow-up. Hazard ratios (HR) were calculated by multivariate Cox regression.
No associations were found for all cancer sites combined, or for prostate or colorectal cancer. For breast cancer, boiled coffee =4 versus
PubMed ID
20512657 View in PubMed
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COPD 'diagnosis' based on spirometric reference equations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99098
Source
Clin Respir J. 2008 Oct;2(4):214-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Jan Olofson
Björn Bake
Maria Nilsson Tengelin
Birgitta Houltz
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. jan.olofson@lungall.gu.se
Source
Clin Respir J. 2008 Oct;2(4):214-9
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Bronchodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Chi-Square Distribution
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Probability
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Reference Values
Registries
Risk assessment
Sampling Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Spirometry - methods - standards
Sweden
Vital Capacity
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is suspected if the ratio between forced expired volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and forced vital capacity is below 0.7 after bronchodilatation, according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). As this ratio varies with age and gender, the lower limit of normality (LLN) of appropriate reference equations appears more adequate. OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalences of suspected COPD according to the GOLD criterion and various reference equations in a well-defined population sample. METHODS: Spirometries obtained in a random population sample of 598 men, 50 or 60 years of age, were analysed. The prevalences of suspected COPD were calculated according to the GOLD criterion and the LLNs of four Nordic and two European reference equations. RESULTS: The GOLD criterion resulted in prevalences of COPD of 9.3% and 23.7% in the 50- and 60-year-old never-smokers, respectively. Depending on the reference equation, the calculated prevalences of COPD varied between 9.3% and 23.4% and 12.0% and 39.1% among all of the 50- and 60-year-old men, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The GOLD criterion is inadequate because of substantial overestimation in 60-year-old never-smokers. LLNs of the various reference equations are unreliable because of obvious lack of consistency. Spirometric criteria for airway obstruction, and suspicion of COPD, therefore need to be revised.
PubMed ID
20298337 View in PubMed
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Dairy intake revisited - associations between dairy intake and lifestyle related cardio-metabolic risk factors in a high milk consuming population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300924
Source
Nutr J. 2018 11 22; 17(1):110
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-22-2018
Author
Ingegerd Johansson
Lena Maria Nilsson
Anders Esberg
Jan-Håkan Jansson
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ingegerd.johansson@umu.se.
Source
Nutr J. 2018 11 22; 17(1):110
Date
11-22-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Blood glucose
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dairy Products
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Life Style
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sweden
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The association between milk and dairy intake and the incidence of cardiometabolic diseases, cancer and mortality has been evaluated in many studies, but these studies have had conflicting results with no clear conclusion on causal or confounding associations. The present study aims to further address this association by cross-sectional and longitudinal evaluation of the associations between exposure to various types of dairy products and metabolic risk markers among inhabitants in northern Sweden while taking other lifestyle factors into account.
Respondents in the Västerbotten Intervention Programme with complete and plausible diet data between 1991 and 2016 were included, yielding 124,934 observations from 90,512 unique subjects. For longitudinal analysis, 27,682 participants with a visit 8-12?years after the first visit were identified. All participants completed a validated Food Frequency Questionnaire. Metabolic risk markers, including body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, serum (S) cholesterol and triglycerides, and blood glucose, were measured. Participants were categorized into quintiles by intake of dairy products, and risk (odds ratios, OR) of undesirable levels of metabolic risk markers was assessed in multivariable logistic regression analyses. In longitudinal analyses, intake quintiles were related to desirable levels of metabolic risk markers at both visits or deterioration at follow-up using Cox regression analyses.
The OR of being classified with an undesirable BMI decreased with increasing quintiles of total dairy, cheese and butter intake but increased with increasing non-fermented milk intake. The OR of being classified with an undesirable S-cholesterol level increased with increasing intake of total dairy, butter and high fat (3%) non-fermented milk, whereas an undesirable S-triglyceride level was inversely associated with cheese and butter intake in women. In longitudinal analyses, increasing butter intake was associated with deterioration of S-cholesterol and blood glucose levels, whereas increasing cheese intake was associated with a lower risk of deterioration of S-triglycerides.
Confounding factors likely contribute to the demonstrated association between dairy intake and mortality, and other medical conditions and analyses should be stratified by dairy type.
PubMed ID
30466440 View in PubMed
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Dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate predict the 5-year risk of coronary heart disease events in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260026
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Oct 28;64(17):1801-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-28-2014
Author
Åsa Tivesten
Liesbeth Vandenput
Daniel Carlzon
Maria Nilsson
Magnus K Karlsson
Östen Ljunggren
Elizabeth Barrett-Connor
Dan Mellström
Claes Ohlsson
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Oct 28;64(17):1801-10
Date
Oct-28-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chromatography, Gas
Chromatography, Liquid
Coronary Disease - blood - diagnosis
Dehydroepiandrosterone - blood
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate - blood
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Mass Spectrometry
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The adrenal sex hormone dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), which is present in serum mainly as the sulfate DHEA-S, is the most abundant steroid hormone in human blood. Its levels decline dramatically with age. Despite the great amount of literature on vascular and metabolic actions of DHEA/-S, evidence for an association between DHEA/-S levels and cardiovascular events is contradictory.
This study tested the hypothesis that serum DHEA and DHEA-S are predictors of major coronary heart disease (CHD) and/or cerebrovascular disease (CBD) events in a large cohort of elderly men.
We used gas and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to analyze baseline levels of DHEA and DHEA-S in the prospective population-based Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study in Sweden (2,416 men, ages 69 to 81 years). Complete cardiovascular clinical outcomes were available from national Swedish registers.
During the 5-year follow-up, 302 participants experienced a CHD event, and 225 had a CBD event. Both DHEA and DHEA-S levels were inversely associated with the age-adjusted risk of a CHD event; the hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals per SD increase were 0.82 (0.73 to 0.93) and 0.86 (0.77 to 0.97), respectively. In contrast, DHEA/-S showed no statistically significant association with the risk of CBD events. The association between DHEA and CHD risk remained significant after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, serum total testosterone and estradiol, C-reactive protein, and renal function, and remained unchanged after exclusion of the first 2.6 years of follow-up to reduce reverse causality.
Low serum levels of DHEA and its sulfate predict an increased risk of CHD, but not CBD, events in elderly men.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Oct 28;64(17):1811-325443703
PubMed ID
25443702 View in PubMed
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Determinants of waterpipe use amongst adolescents in Northern Sweden: a survey of use pattern, risk perception, and environmental factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273709
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2015;8:441
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Rathi Ramji
Judy Arnetz
Maria Nilsson
Hikmet Jamil
Fredrik Norström
Wasim Maziak
Ywonne Wiklund
Bengt Arnetz
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2015;8:441
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Environment
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marketing
Risk-Taking
Sanitary Engineering
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Determinants of waterpipe use in adolescents are believed to differ from those for other tobacco products, but there is a lack of studies of possible social, cultural, or psychological aspects of waterpipe use in this population. This study applied a socioecological model to explore waterpipe use, and its relationship to other tobacco use in Swedish adolescents.
A total of 106 adolescents who attended an urban high-school in northern Sweden responded to an anonymous questionnaire. Prevalence rates for waterpipe use were examined in relation to socio-demographics, peer pressure, sensation seeking behavior, harm perception, environmental factors, and depression.
Thirty-three percent reported ever having smoked waterpipe (ever use), with 30% having done so during the last 30 days (current use). Among waterpipe ever users, 60% had ever smoked cigarettes in comparison to 32% of non-waterpipe smokers (95% confidence interval 1.4-7.9). The odds of having ever smoked waterpipe were three times higher among male high school seniors as well as students with lower grades. Waterpipe ever users had three times higher odds of having higher levels of sensation-seeking (95% confidence interval 1.2-9.5) and scored high on the depression scales (95% confidence interval 1.6-6.8) than non-users. The odds of waterpipe ever use were four times higher for those who perceived waterpipe products to have pleasant smell compared to cigarettes (95% confidence interval 1.7-9.8). Waterpipe ever users were twice as likely to have seen waterpipe use on television compared to non-users (95% confidence interval 1.1-5.7). The odds of having friends who smoked regularly was eight times higher for waterpipe ever users than non-users (95% confidence interval 2.1-31.2).
The current study reports a high use of waterpipe in a select group of students in northern Sweden. The study adds the importance of looking at socioecological determinants of use, including peer pressure and exposure to media marketing, as well as mental health among users.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26374502 View in PubMed
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Diet and lifestyle of the Sami of southern Lapland in the 1930s-1950s and today.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100980
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 May 31;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-31-2011
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
Lars Dahlgren
Ingegerd Johansson
Magritt Brustad
Per Sjölander
Bethany Van Guelpen
Author Affiliation
Näringsforskning, Umeå universitet, SE-901 85, Umeå, Sweden. ena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 May 31;
Date
May-31-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objectives. To describe the lifestyle of the Sami of southern Lapland 50 to 70 years ago in relation to the present-day Sami and non-Sami populations and, thereby, to provide a basis for future studies of culturally related determinants of health and illness. Study design. A qualitative analysis, and a quantitative comparison of Sami and non-Sami groups. Methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 elderly Sami concerning their parents' lifestyle and diet 50 to 70 years ago. Questionnaire data from 81 reindeer-herding Sami, 226 non-reindeer-herding Sami and 1,842 sex-, age- and geographically matched non-Sami from the population-based Västerbotten Intervention Project were analysed by non-parametric tests and partial least squares methodology. Results. Surprisingly, fatty fish may have been more important than reindeer meat for the Sami of southern Lapland in the 1930s to 1950s, and it is still consumed more frequently by reindeer-herding Sami than nonreindeer-herding Sami and non-Sami. Other dietary characteristics of the historical Sami and present-day reindeer-herding Sami were higher intakes of fat, blood and boiled coffee, and lower intakes of bread, fibre and cultivated vegetables, compared with present-day non-Sami. Physical activity was also a part of the daily life of the Sami to a greater extent in the 1930s to 1950s than today. Sami men often worked far from home, while the women were responsible for fishing, farming, gardening (which was introduced in the 1930-1950 period), as well as housework and childcare. Conclusions. For studies investigating characteristic lifestyle elements of specific ethnic groups, the elements of greatest acknowledged cultural importance today (in this case reindeer meat) may not be of the most objective importance traditionally.
PubMed ID
21631968 View in PubMed
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