Skip header and navigation
Did you mean name:" Maria lönnrot"? Also try lönnrot, or lönnroth.

3 records – page 1 of 1.

Enterovirus infections are associated with the induction of beta-cell autoimmunity in a prospective birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187748
Source
J Med Virol. 2003 Jan;69(1):91-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Kimmo Salminen
Karita Sadeharju
Maria Lönnrot
Paula Vähäsalo
Antti Kupila
Sari Korhonen
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Heikki Hyöty
Author Affiliation
Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Center for Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes in Finland.
Source
J Med Virol. 2003 Jan;69(1):91-8
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae Infections - immunology - virology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Autoantibodies - blood
Autoimmunity
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications - epidemiology - immunology - virology
Enterovirus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prospective Studies
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Abstract
Enterovirus infections have been associated with the manifestation of clinical type 1 diabetes in a number of reports, and recent prospective studies have suggested that enterovirus infections may initiate the autoimmune process, leading to the disease. In the present study, we analyzed the role of enterovirus infections in a Finnish birth cohort study, Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP), in which all newborn infants are screened for diabetes-associated HLA-DQB1 alleles, and those with an increased genetic risk are invited for prospective follow-up. Enterovirus infections were diagnosed by serology and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) from serum samples taken from birth every 3-6 months. Case children included 41 infants who became positive for diabetes-associated autoantibodies during the observation. Control children comprised altogether 196 infants who remained autoantibody negative and were matched for the time of birth, sex, and HLA-DQB1 alleles. Enterovirus infections were more frequent in case children than in control children (P = 0.004), and the average enterovirus antibody levels were also higher in the case children (P = 0.003). Enterovirus infections were particularly frequent during the 6-month period preceding the first detection of autoantibodies: 51% of the case children compared with 28% of the control children had an infection in that time interval (P = 0.003). There was no difference in the frequency of adenovirus infections between the groups (P = 0.9). The present results imply that enterovirus infections are associated with the appearance of beta-cell autoantibodies. A possible causal relationship is supported by the clustering of infections to the time when autoantibodies appeared.
PubMed ID
12436483 View in PubMed
Less detail

Human parechovirus 1 infections in young children--no association with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165066
Source
J Med Virol. 2007 Apr;79(4):457-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Sisko Tauriainen
Mika Martiskainen
Sami Oikarinen
Maria Lönnrot
Hanna Viskari
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Heikki Hyöty
Author Affiliation
JDRF Center for Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes,Tampere, Finland. Sisko.Tauriainen@uta.fi
Source
J Med Virol. 2007 Apr;79(4):457-62
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - etiology - genetics
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
HLA-DQ Antigens - genetics
HLA-DQ beta-Chains
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Parechovirus - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Picornaviridae Infections - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
The epidemiology, transmission and clinical symptoms of human parechoviruses [HPeV, classified earlier as enteroviruses; echovirus 22 (HPeV1) and echovirus 23 (HPeV2)] remain poorly characterized. Enteroviruses and one parechovirus species, the Ljungan virus, have been associated with type 1 diabetes in humans and rodents. The occurrence of human parechovirus 1 (HPeV1) infections in young children and their possible association with type 1 diabetes was evaluated. The prospective birth cohort study comprised 221 Finnish children carrying genetic type 1 diabetes susceptibility and who were observed from birth. Thirty-four children developed multiple diabetes-associated autoantibodies, and 18 children progressed to clinical type 1 diabetes during the follow-up. HPeV1 infections were diagnosed by measuring neutralizing antibodies from the follow-up sera taken every 3-12 months. In addition, viral RNA was analysed by RT-PCR from stool samples taken every month from six of the participants. HPeV1 infections were found to occur early in childhood. The median age of infection was 18 months and 20% of the children had had an infection by the age of 1 year. The number of infections started to increase from the age of 6 months and most children had their first infection by 36 months. Nearly all (99%) mothers were HPeV1 antibody positive. No difference was found in infection frequency between boys and girls, nor between prediabetic, diabetic and control subjects. Most infections (87%) occurred during autumn, winter and spring.
PubMed ID
17311340 View in PubMed
Less detail

Temporal relationship between human parechovirus 1 infection and otitis media in young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157309
Source
J Infect Dis. 2008 Jul 1;198(1):35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2008
Author
Sisko Tauriainen
Sami Oikarinen
Kirsi Taimen
Jussi Laranne
Markku Sipilä
Maria Lönnrot
Jorma Ilonen
Olli Simell
Mikael Knip
Heikki Hyöty
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Virology, University of Tampere Medical School, 33014 University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. Sisko.Tauriainen@uta.fi
Source
J Infect Dis. 2008 Jul 1;198(1):35-40
Date
Jul-1-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Cough - virology
Ear, Middle - virology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - virology
Parechovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Picornaviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology
Prospective Studies
RNA, Viral - analysis
Seasons
Time Factors
Abstract
Human parechovirus (HPeV) 1 is a common virus that infects almost everyone during childhood. Because clinical symptoms are poorly documented, we evaluated the symptoms associated with HPeV1 infection in a cohort of children followed prospectively from birth at 3-month intervals.
Symptoms such as fever, cough, those of the common cold, otitis media, and gastroenteritis were determined from hospital records and from questionnaires administered to the parents of 59 children during regular study visits. HPeV1 infections were diagnosed by measuring neutralizing antibodies in follow-up serum samples. Additionally, HPeV RNA was analyzed in middle ear fluid (MEF) and nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from 33 patients with otitis media by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction.
Otitis media showed a clear association with HPeV1 infection-it developed in 50% of the 3-month follow-up periods that yielded evidence for HPeV1 infection but in only 14% of the HPeV1-negative periods (odds ratio [OR], 6.14 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 2.75-13.77]). In children with recurring otitis media, MEF samples were positive for HPeV in 15% of episodes. Cough was also associated with HPeV1 infection, but this association was weaker (OR, 3.67 [95% CI, 1.66-8.09]). Other symptoms were not linked to HPeV1 infection.
HPeV1 infections are common in childhood and may cause otitis media and cough.
PubMed ID
18462136 View in PubMed
Less detail