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Bridging two worlds: Maori mental health nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123463
Source
Qual Health Res. 2012 Aug;22(8):1073-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Denise Wilson
Maria Baker
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health & Psychosocial Studies, Auckland University of Technology, North Shore, Auckland, New Zealand. denisel.wilson@aut.ac.nz
Source
Qual Health Res. 2012 Aug;22(8):1073-82
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Community Mental Health Services - methods
Cultural Competency - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Middle Aged
Population Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Psychiatric Nursing
Abstract
Building an Indigenous mental health workforce is a strategy used to develop culturally responsive and effective mental health services in New Zealand. However, researchers know little about Indigenous (Maori) mental health nursing. We undertook a Maori-centered methodology and grounded theory using focus groups to collect data from 10 Maori mental health nurses. We then analyzed the data using constant comparative analysis and theoretical sampling until saturation of the core category and subcategories emerged. "Bridging two worlds," together with two subcategories, "going beyond" and "practicing differently," explains the process Maori mental health nurses used to resolve the tensions they encountered working in the worlds of mainstream and Maori health services. This research provides insight into the tensions Indigenous and minority nurses experience when attempting to integrate cultural perspectives and practices to meet the needs of their patients.
PubMed ID
22695831 View in PubMed
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