Skip header and navigation

Refine By

22 records – page 1 of 3.

Alterations of telomere length and DNA methylation in hairdressers: A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274023
Source
Environ Mol Mutagen. 2016 Mar;57(2):159-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Huiqi Li
Gabriella Åkerman
Carola Lidén
Ayman Alhamdow
Tomasz K Wojdacz
Karin Broberg
Maria Albin
Source
Environ Mol Mutagen. 2016 Mar;57(2):159-67
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16 - genetics
DNA Methylation
DNA Modification Methylases - genetics
DNA Repair Enzymes - genetics
Female
Glutathione S-Transferase pi - genetics
Humans
Middle Aged
Nuclear Proteins - genetics
Occupational Diseases - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Sweden
Telomere
Time Factors
Tumor Suppressor Proteins - genetics
Twist Transcription Factor - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Working as hairdressers has been associated with increased risk for cancer, particularly bladder cancer. To evaluate if current hairdressers have elevated risks of adverse health effects, we measured several biomarkers related to cancer-related DNA alterations. We enrolled 295 hairdressers and 92 non-hairdressers (all female non-smokers) from Stockholm and southern Sweden. Questionnaire data were collected for each participant, including work tasks for the hairdressers. We measured telomere length in peripheral blood leucocytes using quantitative PCR and DNA methylation status of genes relevant for bladder cancer using methylation sensitive high resolution melting analysis. The hairdressers had shorter telomeres (ß =?-0.069, P = 0.019) compared with non-hairdressers. Shorter telomeres were found in hairdressers up to 32 years old performing hair waving more than once per week as compared with hairdressers in the same age group performing hair waving less often (ß =?-0.12, P = 0.037). Hair waving was associated with less frequent CDKN2A methylation (odds ratio, OR = 0.19, P = 0.033). Shorter telomeres in hairdressers may indicate a genotoxic effect. Performing hair waving was associated with short telomere length, although the effect was only observed in young hairdressers. No clear patterns were discerned with regard to DNA methylation of bladder cancer-related genes. The observed changes of methylation were not all in the expected direction and warrant further investigation.
PubMed ID
26637967 View in PubMed
Less detail

Annoyance, sleep and concentration problems due to combined traffic noise and the benefit of quiet side.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272613
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1612-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
Theo Bodin
Jonas Björk
Jonas Ardö
Maria Albin
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Feb;12(2):1612-28
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anger
Attention
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Health Surveys
Housing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise, Transportation - adverse effects - prevention & control
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sleep
Sweden
Abstract
Access to a quiet side in one's dwelling is thought to compensate for higher noise levels at the most exposed façade. It has also been indicated that noise from combined traffic sources causes more noise annoyance than equal average levels from either road traffic or railway noise separately.
2612 persons in Malmö, Sweden, answered to a residential environment survey including questions on outdoor environment, noise sensitivity, noise annoyance, sleep quality and concentration problems. Road traffic and railway noise was modeled using Geographic Information System.
Access to a quiet side, i.e., at least one window facing yard, water or green space, was associated with reduced risk of annoyance OR (95%CI) 0.47 (0.38-0.59), and concentration problems 0.76 (0.61-0.95). Bedroom window facing the same environment was associated to reduced risk of reporting of poor sleep quality 0.78 (0.64-1.00). Railway noise was associated with reduced risk of annoyance below 55 dB(A) but not at higher levels of exposure.
Having a window facing a yard, water or green space was associated to a substantially reduced risk of noise annoyance and concentration problems. If this window was the bedroom window, sleeping problems were less likely.
Notes
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 2004 Aug;116(2):949-5715376661
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 1979 Apr;134:382-9444788
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2001 Apr;109(4):409-1611335190
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1993 Apr 29;328(17):1230-58464434
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1994 Oct 10;154(19):2219-247944843
Cites: Environ Health. 2012;11(1):1422404876
Cites: Sci Total Environ. 2012 May 1;424:48-5622444069
Cites: J Hypertens. 2012 Jun;30(6):1075-8622473017
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2012 Dec;9(12):4292-31023330222
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2013 Feb;121(2):217-2223229017
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2013 Jun;10(6):2258-7023736655
Cites: Lancet. 2014 Apr 12;383(9925):1325-3224183105
Cites: Noise Health. 2006 Jan-Mar;8(30):1-2917513892
Cites: Noise Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;10(39):46-5418580038
Cites: Epidemiology. 2009 Mar;20(2):272-919116496
Cites: Noise Health. 2010 Apr-Jun;12(47):110-920472956
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2011 Mar;32(6):737-4421266374
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 2011 Oct;130(4):1936-4221973348
Cites: Sleep. 2008 Apr;31(4):569-7718457245
Cites: J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Nov;122(5):2642-5218189556
Cites: Noise Health. 2007 Jan-Mar;9(34):1-717851221
Cites: Behav Sleep Med. 2007;5(1):1-2017313321
PubMed ID
25642690 View in PubMed
Less detail

Area-aggregated assessments of perceived environmental attributes may overcome single-source bias in studies of green environments and health: results from a cross-sectional survey in southern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137891
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10(1):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kim de Jong
Maria Albin
Erik Skärbäck
Patrik Grahn
John Wadbro
Juan Merlo
Jonas Björk
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10(1):4
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bias (epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Female
Geographic Information Systems
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Econometric
Public Health
Public Opinion
Residence Characteristics
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Most studies assessing health effects of neighborhood characteristics either use self-reports or objective assessments of the environment, the latter often based on Geographical Information Systems (GIS). While objective measures require detailed landscape data, self-assessments may yield confounded results. In this study we demonstrate how self-assessments of green neighborhood environments aggregated to narrow area units may serve as an appealing compromise between objective measures and individual self-assessments.
The study uses cross-sectional data (N = 24,847) from a public health survey conducted in the county of Scania, southern Sweden, in 2008 and validates the Scania Green Score (SGS), a new index comprising five self-reported green neighborhood qualities (Culture, Lush, Serene, Spacious and Wild). The same qualities were also assessed objectively using landscape data and GIS. A multilevel (ecometric) model was used to aggregate individual self-reports to assessments of perceived green environmental attributes for areas of 1,000 square meters. We assessed convergent and concurrent validity for self-assessments of the five items separately and for the sum score, individually and area-aggregated.
Correlations between the index scores based on self-assessments and the corresponding objective assessments were clearly present, indicating convergent validity, but the agreement was low. The correlation was even more evident for the area-aggregated SGS. All three scores (individual SGS, area-aggregated SGS and GIS index score) were associated with neighborhood satisfaction, indicating concurrent validity. However, while individual SGS was associated with vitality, this association was not present for aggregated SGS and the GIS-index score, suggesting confounding (single-source bias) when individual SGS was used.
Perceived and objectively assessed qualities of the green neighborhood environment correlate but do not agree. An index score based on self-reports but aggregated to narrow area units can be a valid approach to assess perceived green neighborhood qualities in settings where objective assessments are not possible or feasible.
Notes
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1997 Jan;54(1):44-89072033
Cites: Environ Health. 2004 Mar 31;3(1):315056391
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2005 Feb;28(2 Suppl 2):126-3315694520
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005 Jun;31(3):184-9015999570
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Jul;60(7):587-9216790830
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2006;6:14916759375
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2006 Oct;35(5):1361-317008359
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Apr 15;165(8):858-6717329713
Cites: Health Place. 2007 Dec;13(4):839-5017392016
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Nov;81(2):179-9117541626
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Dec;61(12):1042-918000125
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2000 Jul 1;152(1):75-8310901332
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Aug;57(8):550-212883048
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 May;58(10):1929-5215020009
Cites: Prev Med. 2004 Jul;39(1):135-4115207994
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1989 Jan;129(1):191-2042910061
Cites: Med Care. 1992 Jun;30(6):473-831593914
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Jun 11;308(6943):15528019315
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 Apr;62(4):e218365329
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2008 May;62(5):e918431834
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2008;8:20618544169
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Nov 8;372(9650):1655-6018994663
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Jan;63(1):24-3018768568
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):586-9519022699
Cites: Environ Int. 2009 Nov;35(8):1169-7619699524
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Oct 12;169(18):1698-70419822827
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2009 Dec;63(12):1043-819666637
Cites: Health Place. 2010 Jul;16(4):744-5420382555
PubMed ID
21235826 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer incidence and mortality in Swedish sterilant workers exposed to ethylene oxide: updated cohort study findings 1972-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132806
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Jun;8(6):2009-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Zoli Mikoczy
Håkan Tinnerberg
Jonas Björk
Maria Albin
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, and Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden. zoli.mikoczy@med.lu.se
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2011 Jun;8(6):2009-19
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Disinfectants - toxicity
Ethylene Oxide - toxicity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess whether cancer incidence, mainly from lymphohaematopoietic tumours and breast cancer, and mortality were increased in a cohort of Swedish sterilant workers exposed to low levels of ethylene oxide (EtO), updated with 16 more years of follow up.
The mortality and cancer incidence 1972-2006 experienced by a cohort of 2,171 male and female workers employed for at least one year in two plants producing medical equipment sterilised with EtO were investigated. Individual cumulative exposure to EtO was assessed by occupational hygienists. Cause-specific standardized rate ratios were calculated using the regional general population as a comparison for mortality (SMR) and cancer incidence (SIR). Internal Poisson-regression analyses were performed for selected causes.
The median cumulative exposure to EtO was 0.13 ppm-years. The overall cancer incidence was close to unity (SIR 0.94, 95% CI 0.82-1.08). Eighteen cases of lymphohaematopoietic cancer were observed (SIR 1.25, 95% CI 0.74-1.98). A healthy worker effect was indicated from a significantly decreased overall mortality and mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Internal analyses found significantly increased rate ratios for breast cancer for the two upper quartiles of cumulative exposure as compared to the lowest 50% of the cohort (IRR 2.76, 95% CI 1.20-6.33 and IRR 3.55, 95% CI 1.58-7.93).
The findings from this updated study indicate limited or low risks for human cancer due to occupational exposure from ethylene oxide at the low cumulative exposure levels in this cohort. However a positive exposure-response relation with breast cancer was observed though.
Notes
Cites: Rev Lat Am Enfermagem. 2006 Mar-Apr;14(2):214-916699695
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2007 Mar;50(3):199-20717096363
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Apr;16(4):796-80217416773
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2007 Apr;50(4):293-30217354254
Cites: J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater. 2007 Nov;83(2):527-3717471516
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2009 Jun;51(6):714-2319430313
Cites: Lancet Oncol. 2009 Dec;10(12):1143-419998521
Cites: Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2002 Sep;17(9):634-912216593
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Aug;14(6):531-912948284
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2004 Jan;61(1):2-714691266
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2004 Apr;61(4):358-6215031395
Cites: Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1984 Aug;75(1):105-176464016
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 May 16;324(20):1402-72020295
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 1991;63(4):271-71743769
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1995 Mar;52(3):154-67735385
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Apr;24(2):276-847635586
PubMed ID
21776215 View in PubMed
Less detail

A Cross-Sectional Study of the Cardiovascular Effects of Welding Fumes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271508
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(7):e0131648
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Huiqi Li
Maria Hedmer
Monica Kåredal
Jonas Björk
Leo Stockfelt
Håkan Tinnerberg
Maria Albin
Karin Broberg
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(7):e0131648
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - toxicity
Blood Pressure - physiology
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cytokines - blood
Endothelium, Vascular - physiopathology
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - blood - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Risk factors
Sweden
Welding
Young Adult
Abstract
Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the risk to welders working today remains unclear. We aimed to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of exposure to welding fumes.
In a cross-sectional study, structured interviews and biological sampling were conducted for 101 welders and 127 controls (all non-smoking males) from southern Sweden. Personal breathing zone sampling of respirable dust was performed. Blood pressure (BP) and endothelial function (using peripheral arterial tonometry) were measured. Plasma and serum samples were collected from peripheral blood for measurement of C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein, homocysteine, serum amyloid A, and cytokines.
Welders were exposed to 10-fold higher levels of particles than controls. Welders had significantly higher BP compared to controls, an average of 5 mm Hg higher systolic and diastolic BP (P = 0.001). IL-8 was 3.4 ng/L higher in welders (P=0.010). Years working as a welder were significantly associated with increased BP (ß=0.35, 95%CI 0.13 - 0.58, P=0.0024 for systolic BP; ß=0.32, 95%CI 0.16 - 0.48, P
Notes
Cites: Am Heart J. 2003 Jul;146(1):168-7412851627
Cites: Int J Occup Environ Health. 2002 Oct-Dec;8(4):309-1112412847
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Mar;112(3):339-4514998750
Cites: BMJ. 2009;338:a308319131384
Cites: Clin Chem. 2009 Feb;55(2):378-8419106185
Cites: Front Biosci (Landmark Ed). 2009;14:3836-4519273314
Cites: Cytokine. 2009 May;46(2):290-519303319
Cites: Toxicol Sci. 2009 Jul;110(1):191-20319270016
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Jun 1;121(21):2331-7820458016
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2010 Nov;67(11):772-720581417
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2011 Mar;215(1):218-2221215401
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2011 May 1;183(9):1222-3021257787
Cites: J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2011 Aug;61(8):858-6321874957
Cites: Part Fibre Toxicol. 2012;9:722452928
Cites: Ann Occup Hyg. 2012 Jul;56(5):557-6722539559
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2012 Sep;69(9):651-722693266
Cites: J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2013 May-Jun;23(3):306-1423340704
Cites: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2013 Apr;26(2):220-923690265
Cites: Lancet. 2013 Sep 21;382(9897):1039-4823849322
Cites: J Hypertens. 2013 Oct;31(10):1925-3824107724
Cites: BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2013;13:8324118794
Cites: Part Fibre Toxicol. 2014;11:2324885771
Cites: Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging. 2014 Jul;15(7):736-4624399339
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2014 Jul;122(7):726-3224647077
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2014 Aug;87(6):623-3423979145
Cites: Part Fibre Toxicol. 2013;10:2023742058
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2015 Apr;88(3):259-7225047981
Cites: Am Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1985 Feb;46(2):89-933976500
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2005 Mar;62(3):157-6315723880
Cites: Circulation. 2005 Jun 7;111(22):2913-2015927967
Cites: J Cardiovasc Risk. 2002 Aug;9(4):191-812394327
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Dec;116(12):1666-7419079718
Cites: Ind Health. 2002 Oct;40(4):328-3412502235
Cites: Crit Rev Toxicol. 2003;33(1):61-10312585507
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Aug;113(8):934-4616079061
Cites: Atherosclerosis. 2005 Oct;182(2):315-2116159604
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Nov;113(11):1485-9016263500
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Dec;113(12):1723-916330354
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2005 Dec 15;172(12):1534-4016210665
Cites: J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2006 Jun;56(6):709-4216805397
Cites: Inhal Toxicol. 2006 Oct;18(11):845-5316864402
Cites: Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2007 Feb;80(4):265-7216791613
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Feb 1;356(5):447-5817267905
Cites: J Occup Environ Hyg. 2007 Sep;4(9):698-70717654225
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Aug 15;176(4):395-40017446340
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2007 Aug;115(8):1177-8217687444
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 Feb 15;177(4):419-2517932377
Cites: Epidemiology. 2008 Mar;19(2):217-2518300696
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Apr;116(4):486-9118414631
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Jul;116(7):898-90618629312
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 Aug 1;178(3):283-918467508
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Aug 26;52(9):719-2618718418
Cites: Curr Hypertens Rep. 2008 Oct;10(5):359-6618775112
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Sep;116(9):1183-818795161
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Feb 17;109(6):726-3214970107
PubMed ID
26147298 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cytogenetic and morphologic subgroups of myelodysplastic syndromes in relation to occupational and hobby exposures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67300
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2003 Oct;29(5):378-87
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Maria Albin
Jonas Björk
Hans Welinder
Håkan Tinnerberg
Nils Mauritzson
Rolf Billström
Ulf Strömberg
Zoli Mikoczy
Bertil Johansson
Tomas Ahlgren
Per-Gunnar Nilsson
Felix Mitelman
Lars Hagmar
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. maria.albin@ymed.lu.se
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2003 Oct;29(5):378-87
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Chromosome Aberrations - statistics & numerical data
Electromagnetic fields
Humans
Logistic Models
Myelodysplastic Syndromes - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the association between occupational and hobby exposure and the risk of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) while focusing on differential patterns of clonal chromosome aberrations and morphologic subgroups. METHODS: A case-referent study was conducted with 330 MDS patients investigated cytogenetically in 1976-1993 (cases) and matched referents. Telephone interviews with either the person or a next-of-kin were used. The participation rate of the cases and referents was 85% and 60%, respectively. Information was obtained from the next-of-kin more often for the cases (88%) than for the referents (26%). Occupational hygienists assessed the exposure using interview data on worktasks and hobbies. Associations with disease risk were evaluated for 10 exposures with a logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The investigated exposures were generally not associated with cytogenetically abnormal MDS. Effect estimates for specific cytogenetic or morphologic subgroups were generally imprecise. Occupational exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (EMF) was associated with MDS with a normal karyotype [odds ratio (OR) 2.0, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0-4.0]. The exposure-response association was consistent for intensity but inconclusive for duration. A decreased risk was observed for MDS, irrespective of karyotypic pattern, among farmers and farmhands (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.35-0.81). CONCLUSIONS: Cytogenetically abnormal MDS was generally not associated with occupational or hobby exposure to known or suspected genotoxic agents. However, exposure prevalences and intensities were low for several agents. An association was suggested between occupational exposure to EMF and MDS with a normal karyotype. Biases due to differential information quality and selective participation cannot be ruled out.
PubMed ID
14584518 View in PubMed
Less detail

DNA methylation of the cancer-related genes F2RL3 and AHRR is associated with occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297917
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2018 07 03; 39(7):869-878
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-03-2018
Author
Ayman Alhamdow
Christian Lindh
Jessika Hagberg
Pål Graff
Håkan Westberg
Annette M Krais
Maria Albin
Per Gustavsson
Håkan Tinnerberg
Karin Broberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Carcinogenesis. 2018 07 03; 39(7):869-878
Date
07-03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors - genetics
Biomarkers, Tumor - genetics
Carcinogens - toxicity
Creosote - adverse effects
DNA Methylation - drug effects
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - chemically induced - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - adverse effects
Receptors, Thrombin - genetics
Repressor Proteins - genetics
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are known carcinogens and workplace PAH exposure may increase the risk of cancer. Monitoring early cancer-related changes can indicate whether the exposure is carcinogenic. Here, we enrolled 151 chimney sweeps, 152 controls and 19 creosote-exposed male workers from Sweden. We measured urinary PAH metabolites using LC/MS/MS, the cancer-related markers telomere length (TL) and mitochondrial DNA copy number (mtDNAcn) using qPCR, and DNA methylation of lung cancer-related genes F2RL3 and AHRR using pyrosequencing. The median 1-hydroxypyrene (PAH metabolite) concentrations were highest in creosote-exposed workers (8.0 µg/g creatinine) followed by chimney sweeps (0.34 µg/g creatinine) and controls (0.05 µg/g creatinine). TL and mtDNAcn did not differ between study groups. Chimney sweeps and creosote-exposed workers had significantly lower methylation of AHRR CpG site cg05575921 (88.1 and 84.9%, respectively) than controls (90%). Creosote-exposed workers (73.3%), but not chimney sweeps (76.6%) had lower methylation of F2RL3 cg03636183 than controls (76.7%). Linear regression analyses showed that chimney sweeps had lower AHRR cg05575921 methylation (B = -2.04; P
PubMed ID
29722794 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early markers of cardiovascular disease are associated with occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299518
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 08 25; 7(1):9426
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-25-2017
Author
Ayman Alhamdow
Christian Lindh
Maria Albin
Per Gustavsson
Håkan Tinnerberg
Karin Broberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Sci Rep. 2017 08 25; 7(1):9426
Date
08-25-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational
Biomarkers
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - metabolism - physiopathology
Humans
Male
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - adverse effects
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Soot
Sweden
Abstract
Occupational exposure to soot, rich in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, our knowledge about PAH exposure and early markers of CVD remains limited. In this cross-sectional study of 151 chimney sweeps and 152 controls, we investigated occupational exposure to PAH and early markers of CVD. Blood pressure (BP) (chimney sweeps only), urinary PAH metabolites and serum biomarkers were measured (C-reactive protein, homocysteine, gamma-glutamyltransferase, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides). Chimney sweeps had up to 7 times higher concentrations of PAH metabolites in urine than controls (P?
PubMed ID
28842704 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effects of changing exposure to neighbourhood greenness on general and mental health: A longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278742
Source
Health Place. 2015 May;33:48-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Hanna Weimann
Lars Rylander
Maria Albin
Erik Skärbäck
Patrik Grahn
Per-Olof Östergren
Jonas Björk
Source
Health Place. 2015 May;33:48-56
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Parks, Recreational
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Green neighbourhood environments have been associated with physical and psychological wellbeing in adults. Access to greenness is potentially more important in vulnerable subgroups. In this study based on longitudinal survey data from southern Sweden the cohort was divided into prognostic groups for good self-reported general (n=8891) and mental (n=9444) health. We used independent survey data to assess perceived neighbourhood greenness in 1km(2) areas, and estimated effects of changing exposure longitudinally stratified by prognostic group. The overall effect on health was small and statistically uncertain (for general health OR 1.04, 95% CI 0.98-1.10, for mental health OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.14). A more beneficial effect of increased greenness was indicated among subjects with lowest prognostic of good general health (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.01-1.52). The study provided only weak evidence for beneficial effects of increased neighbourhood greenness triggered by changing residence. It seems that altered life circumstances, e.g. changed civil or socioeconomic status that often trigger a decision to move, are also the key determinants of the health consequences of changing residence.
PubMed ID
25754263 View in PubMed
Less detail

Female white-collar workers remain at higher risk of breast cancer after adjustments for individual risk factors related to reproduction and lifestyle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285346
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2017 Sep;74(9):652-658
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Cecilia Kullberg
Jenny Selander
Maria Albin
Signe Borgquist
Jonas Manjer
Per Gustavsson
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2017 Sep;74(9):652-658
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Employment
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Occupations - classification
Registries
Reproduction
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Work
Abstract
The aim was to investigate the variation in risk of breast cancer between occupational groups with a focus on white-collar and blue-collar workers and to investigate to what extent the differences were explained by risk factors related to reproduction and lifestyle.
Between 1991 and 1996, 14 119 women born between 1923 and 1950 and residents of Malmö, Sweden, were included in this cohort study. Individual data on risk factors (eg, age, parity, age at first child, months of breast feeding per child, hormonal replacement therapy, physical activity, alcohol consumption, smoking, height and body mass index) and occupational history were assessed using a questionnaire. First-time diagnoses of invasive breast cancer were identified through the Swedish Cancer Registry up until 31 December 2013.
A total of 897 women were diagnosed with breast cancer. Analyses adjusted for age showed an increased risk for white-collar workers compared with blue-collar workers and indicated higher risks in the occupational categories: professionals, administrative and bookkeeping than among women in sales, transportation, production and service work. This difference was only marginally attenuated after adjustment for an extensive set of risk factors related to reproduction and lifestyle.
Reproductive and lifestyle factors explain only a minor part of the increased risk of breast cancer in white-collar workers. Further studies are needed to investigate the remaining factors for the difference in risk between occupational groups.
Notes
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2015 Mar 1;136(5):E359-8625220842
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Feb 8;314(7078):420-49040389
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1996 Oct;30(4):430-78892548
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2011 Jul;54(7):499-50921472744
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2009;48(5):646-79019925375
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Sep 10;290(10):1331-612966124
Cites: Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2013 Feb;138(1):291-30123400581
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 1999 Aug;36(2):271-810398935
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2004 Sep 1;111(3):451-615221976
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2001 Feb;10(1):15-3211263588
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Sep 9;321(7261):624-810977847
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1994 Jan;5(1):73-828123780
Cites: Eur J Cancer Prev. 2001 Dec;10(6):489-9911916347
Cites: World Health Organ Tech Rep Ser. 1995;854:1-4528594834
Cites: Acta Oncol. 2009;48(1):27-3318767000
Cites: Int J Occup Environ Health. 1997 Oct;3(4):254-2589891125
Cites: Cancer Detect Prev. 2001;25(2):132-711341348
Cites: Am J Ind Med. 2008 Feb;51(2):100-1018067183
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 1995 Mar;37(3):328-357796201
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1996 Mar;53(3):145-568704854
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2013 Jul;89:53-6123726216
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Apr;32(2):218-2412714540
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2000 Mar;42(3):284-31010738708
Cites: Breast Cancer Res. 2005;7(3):131-4215987443
Cites: BMJ. 2002 Feb 16;324(7334):410-411850376
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1999 Jun;89(6):875-8110358678
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015 Apr 15;5(4):e00812725877283
PubMed ID
28456763 View in PubMed
Less detail

22 records – page 1 of 3.