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Clinical education in private practice: an interdisciplinary project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180876
Source
J Allied Health. 2004;33(1):47-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Lorna Doubt
Margo Paterson
Anne O'Riordan
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. lornadoubt@sympatico.ca
Source
J Allied Health. 2004;33(1):47-50
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence
Focus Groups
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Occupational Therapy - education
Ontario
Physical Therapy Specialty - education
Preceptorship - methods
Private Practice
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Speech Therapy - education
Students, Health Occupations
Abstract
Education of rehabilitation professionals traditionally has occurred in acute care hospitals, rehabilitation centres, and other publicly funded institutions, but increasing numbers of rehabilitation professionals are now working in the community in private agencies and clinics. These privately owned clinics and community agencies represent underutilized resources for the clinical training of students. Historically, private practitioners have been less likely to participate in clinical education because of concerns over patient satisfaction and quality of care, workload, costs, and liability. Through a program funded by the Ministry of Health of Ontario, we conducted a series of interviews and focus groups with private practitioners, which identified that several incentives could potentially increase the numbers of clinical placements in private practices, including participation in the development of student learning objectives related to private practice, professional recognition, and improved relationships with the university departments. Placement in private practices can afford students skills in administration, business management, marketing and promotion, resource development, research, consulting, networking, and medical-legal assessments and processes. This paper presents a discussion of clinical education issues from the perspective of private practitioners, based on the findings of a clinical education project undertaken at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, and previous literature.
PubMed ID
15053220 View in PubMed
Less detail

Developing empathy as a foundation of client-centred practice: evaluation of a university curriculum initiative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169383
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Apr;73(2):76-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Margaret Jamieson
Terry Krupa
Anne O'Riordan
Donna O'Connor
Margo Paterson
Caroline Ball
Susan Wilcox
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, ON. jamiesnm@post.queensu.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2006 Apr;73(2):76-85
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Curriculum
Disabled Persons - psychology
Empathy
Humans
Occupational Therapy - education
Patient-Centered Care
Pilot Projects
Students, Health Occupations
Abstract
The foundation of client-centred practice is the therapist's capacity to view the world through the client's eyes and to develop an understanding of the lived experience of disability.
This paper describes the evaluation of an educational initiative promoting student empathy to the lived experience of disability.
Pairs of first-year occupational therapy students visited adults with disabilities who shared their knowledge and experience of living with a disability. Students reflected on their visits in journals, which were later analyzed using pattern matching.
Students appeared to appreciate the co-existence of health and disorder and demonstrated a holistic understanding of living with a disability. Little attention was focused on cultural and institutional environments. Students struggled to define the nature of their relationship with their tutors. Practice Implications. The evaluation confirmed our belief that this educational initiative could facilitate student empathy, consistent with critical features of client-centred practice.
PubMed ID
16680911 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development and pilot testing of the collaborative practice assessment tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138388
Source
J Interprof Care. 2011 May;25(3):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Corinne Schroder
Jennifer Medves
Margo Paterson
Vaughan Byrnes
Christine Chapman
Anne O'Riordan
Deborah Pichora
Carly Kelly
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health Sciences, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Interprof Care. 2011 May;25(3):189-95
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chi-Square Distribution
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Ontario
Patient care team
Pilot Projects
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Collaborative practice is receiving increased attention as a model of healthcare delivery that positively influences the effectiveness and efficiency of patient care while improving the work environment of healthcare providers. The collaborative practice assessment tool (CPAT) was developed from the literature to enable interprofessional teams to assess their collaborative practice. The CPAT survey included 56 items across nine domains including: mission and goals; relationships; leadership; role responsibilities and autonomy; communication; decision-making and conflict management; community linkages and coordination; perceived effectiveness and patient involvement; in addition to three open-ended questions. The tool was developed for use in a variety of settings involving a diversity of healthcare providers with the aim of helping teams to identify professional development needs and corresponding educational interventions. The results of two pilot tests indicated that the CPAT is a valid and reliable tool for assessing levels of collaborative practice within teams. This article describes the development of the tool, the pilot testing and validation process, as well as limitations of the tool.
PubMed ID
21182434 View in PubMed
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Exploring Canadian occupational therapists' understanding of and experiences in community development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160447
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2007 Oct 4;74(4):314-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-4-2007
Author
Heidi Lauckner
Wendy Pentland
Margo Paterson
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. 1hl7@queensu.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2007 Oct 4;74(4):314-25
Date
Oct-4-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Consumer Participation
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Therapy - methods
Professional Competence
Social Change
Abstract
Occupational therapists are increasingly recognizing the importance of working with communities as a way to enhance health and well-being. Such work can occur through community development, a community-driven process in which communities are supported in identifying and addressing their health priorities.
This paper presents the qualitative findings of a study that explored the experiences of occupational therapists in Canada working in community development including how they understand community development and how they designed their role in this field.
Occupational therapists working in community development shared their experiences and understanding of community development during 12 interviews.
The results of this study describe the iterative, reflexive process occupational therapists have undergone in coming to establish their role in this field.
Recommendations are made regarding the preparation of future occupational therapists and for supporting those currently working in this field.
PubMed ID
17985754 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 2005 Jul 19;173(2):127-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-19-2005

A new inter-professional course preparing learners for life in rural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158604
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Jan-Mar;8(1):836
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jennifer Medves
Margo Paterson
Christine Y Chapman
John H Young
Elizabeth Tata
Denise Bowes
Neil Hobbs
Brian McAndrews
Anne O'Riordan
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Jan-Mar;8(1):836
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Professional - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Program Development
Program Evaluation
Rural health services - organization & administration
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The 'Professionals in Rural Practice' course was developed with the aim of preparing students enrolled in professional programs in Canada to become better equipped for the possible eventuality of professional work in a rural setting. To match the reality of living and working in a rural community, which by nature is interprofessional, the course designers were an interprofessional teaching team. In order to promote group cohesiveness the course included the participation of an interprofessional group of students and instructors from the disciplines of medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, teacher education, and theology. The format of the course included three-hour classes over an eight-week period and a two-day field experience in a rural community. The course utilized various experiential and interactive teaching and learning methods, along with a variety of assessment methods. Data were collected from student participants over two iterations of the course using a mixed methods approach. Results demonstrate that students value the interprofessional and experiential approach to learning and viewed this course as indispensable for gaining knowledge of other professions and preparation for rural practice. The data reveal important organizational and pedagogical considerations specific to interprofessional education, community based action research, and the unique interprofessional nature of training for life and work in a rural community. This study also indicates the potential value of further longitudinal study of participants in this course. Key words: Canada, community based action research, education, interdisciplinary, interprofessional.
PubMed ID
18302494 View in PubMed
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Preparing professionals from a wide range of disciplines for life and work in rural and small communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167107
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2006 Oct;14(5):225-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Jennifer M Medves
Margo Paterson
The Reverend John H Young
Brian McAndrews
Denise Bowes
The Reverend Elaine Smith
Neil Hobbs
Fairleigh Seaton
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Queen's University, 92 Barrie Street, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. medvesj@post.queensu.ca
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2006 Oct;14(5):225-6
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Catchment Area (Health)
Family Practice - manpower
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Professional Practice Location
Rural health services - organization & administration
Social Environment
Abstract
A new inter-professional subject has been offered at a Canadian university, which examines issues related to professionals' integrating into rural practice; understanding the history and geography of rural communities and important issues affecting life in rural settings.
PubMed ID
17032300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of clinical placements as a means of recruiting health care professionals to underserviced areas in Southeastern Ontario: part 2 - community perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165463
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2007 Feb;15(1):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Kelly van Diepen
Michelle MacRae
Margo Paterson
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2007 Feb;15(1):29-34
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Employee Incentive Plans - economics - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - economics - manpower
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medically underserved area
Ontario
Personnel Selection - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Professional Practice Location - economics - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Rural Health Services - economics - manpower
Students, Health Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Part 2 of this two-part study identifies current recruitment strategies and existing incentives used by underserviced communities to recruit health science students during the clinical placement stage. Discussion surrounding current gaps in recruitment strategies and potential funding sources are explored.
Mixed-method two-part study using a self-administered questionnaire.
Six community hospitals and one private practice.
Community resource contact from seven underserviced communities in Southeastern Ontario.
Level of community agreement that current recruitment strategies include travel stipends, rent-free accommodation and interprofessional education opportunities.
A 100% response rate established that one sample community provides travel stipends, three provide rent-free accommodation, and four offer interprofessional education opportunities. These incentives were frequently offered exclusively to medical students.
When considering the results from part 1 of the study, there is a substantial gap between financial incentives students deem important in the creation of an appealing clinical placement opportunity and the provisions offered to them by the sample communities. The findings of this study support the need for a recruitment enhancement program in Southeastern Ontario.
PubMed ID
17257296 View in PubMed
Less detail

Use of clinical placements as a means of recruiting health care students to underserviced areas in Southeastern Ontario: part 1 - student perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165464
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2007 Feb;15(1):21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Michelle MacRae
Kelly van Diepen
Margo Paterson
Author Affiliation
School of Rehabilitation Therapy, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Aust J Rural Health. 2007 Feb;15(1):21-8
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Career Choice
Employee Incentive Plans - economics
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - economics - manpower
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Rural Health Services - economics - manpower
Students, Health Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This two-part study examines the present gap between financial and educational incentives required and the recruitment strategies used to draw health science students to underserviced areas in Southeastern Ontario. Part 1 explores the impact of offering travel stipends, rent-free accommodation and interprofessional educational opportunities to health science students on their willingness to participate in clinical placements in underserviced areas.
Mixed-method two-part study using a self-administered questionnaire.
Canadian university campus.
Four hundred and sixty-eight senior level medical, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy and X-ray technology students from a Canadian university and affiliated professional school.
The influence of currently established incentives on student willingness to complete a clinical placement in designated underserviced communities in Southeastern Ontario.
Based on a 75% response rate, the results demonstrate that, in general, students agree that they are more willing to complete a clinical placement in an underserviced community if provided travel stipends (75%), rent-free housing (92%) and interprofessional educational opportunities (65%). Students also identified 15 additional factors influencing willingness.
Students are more willing to complete clinical placements in underserviced communities if provided incentives. The findings of this study support an interprofessional clinical education and recruitment enhancement program in Southeastern Ontario.
PubMed ID
17257295 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.