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A 9-year prospective population-based study on the association between the APOE*E4 allele and late-life depression in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274872
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2015 Nov 15;78(10):730-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-2015
Author
Ingmar Skoog
Margda Waern
Paul Duberstein
Kaj Blennow
Henrik Zetterberg
Anne Börjesson-Hanson
Svante Östling
Xinxin Guo
Jürgen Kern
Deborah Gustafson
Pia Gudmundsson
Thomas Marlow
Silke Kern
Source
Biol Psychiatry. 2015 Nov 15;78(10):730-6
Date
Nov-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - genetics
Depressive Disorder, Major - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Late Onset Disorders - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
It is well established that there is an association between the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele (APOE*E4) and Alzheimer's disease. It is less clear whether there is also an association with geriatric depression. We examined the relationship between APOE*E4 and 5-year incidence of depression in a Swedish population-based sample of older adults without dementia and excluding older adults who developed dementia within 4 years after the diagnosis of depression.
In 2000-2001, 839 women and men (age range, 70-92 years; mean age, 73.8 years) free from dementia and depression underwent neuropsychiatric and neuropsychological examinations and genotyping of the APOE*E4 allele. Follow-up evaluations were conducted in 2005 and 2009.The association between APOE*E4 allele and 5-year incidence of depression was examined, while avoiding possible confounding effects of clinical or preclinical dementia by excluding participants who had dementia at study entry, subsequently developed dementia during the 9-year follow-up period, or had a decline in Mini-Mental State Examination score of =5 points.
Among subjects without depression at study entry and without dementia or significant cognitive decline during the subsequent 9 years, APOE*E4 was prospectively associated with more severe depressive symptoms (b = 1.56, p = .007), incident minor depression (odds ratio = 1.99 [confidence interval = 1.11-3.55], p = .020), and any depression (odds ratio = 1.75 [confidence interval = 1.01-3.03], p = .048).
The presence of the APOE*E4 allele predicted future depression in this Swedish population study, even after excluding depressed individuals who later developed dementia, suggesting that the APOE*E4 allele could potentially identify people at high risk for clinically significant depression.
Notes
Comment In: Biol Psychiatry. 2015 Nov 15;78(10):670-126497282
PubMed ID
25708227 View in PubMed
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37 Years of Body Mass Index and Dementia: Effect Modification by the APOE Genotype: Observations from the Prospective Population Study of Women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275033
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):1119-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kristoffer Bäckman
Erik Joas
Margda Waern
Svante Östling
Xinxin Guo
Kaj Blennow
Ingmar Skoog
Deborah R Gustafson
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2015;48(4):1119-27
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alleles
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics
Body mass index
Body Weight - genetics
Dementia - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Overweight and obesity in mid- and late-life may increase risk for dementia, whereas a decline in body weight or body mass index (BMI) and underweight in years preceding a clinical dementia diagnosis are also associated with dementia. Little is known about the modifying effect of the APOE genotype, a major susceptibility gene for Alzheimer's disease (AD), on the BMI-dementia adult life course trajectory.
We evaluated the exposure, BMI, in relationship to the outcome, clinical dementia, over 37 years, considering the effect modification of the APOE ?4 allele.
The Prospective Population Study of Women (PPSW) in Sweden is a systematic sample of 1462 women born 1908, 1914, 1918, 1922, and 1930 and aged 38-60 years at baseline. Examinations occurred in 1968, 1974, 1980, 1992, 2000, and 2005; 559 women had information on dementia, BMI, and APOE ?4 allele status, in addition to covariates. Statistical analyses were conducted using mixed effects regression models.
Trajectories of BMI over 37 years differed by APOE ?4 allele status. While women gained BMI similarly from mid-life to age 70 years, women with at least one APOE ?4 allele experienced BMI decline more quickly after age 70 years compared to women without an APOE ?4 allele. However, upon stratifying the sample by dementia occurrence, it appeared that dementia drove the overall BMI-trajectory. There was a main effect of age, interactions of age by APOE ?4 allele status, and age by presence versus absence of dementia.
Women with similar average BMI at mid-life exhibited different BMI trajectories in relation to dementia occurrence. In addition, the pattern of BMI decline in late-life differed on the basis of APOE ?4 allele possession. Thus, these data suggest roles for both dementia- and APOE-associated changes in BMI during the adult life course.
PubMed ID
26402098 View in PubMed
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37 years of body mass index and dementia: observations from the prospective population study of women in Gothenburg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130808
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2012;28(1):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Deborah R Gustafson
Kristoffer Bäckman
Erik Joas
Margda Waern
Svante Östling
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurochemistry and Psychiatry, Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. deborah.gustafson@neuro.gu.se
Source
J Alzheimers Dis. 2012;28(1):163-71
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Dementia - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Level of adiposity is linked to dementia in epidemiological studies. Overweight and obesity in mid- and late-life may increase risk for dementia, whereas decline in body weight or body mass index (BMI) and underweight in years preceding and at the time of a dementia diagnosis may also relate to dementia. Longitudinal studies with sufficient follow-up are necessary to estimate trajectories that allow better understanding of the relationship between adiposity indices and dementia over the life course. We evaluated the natural history of BMI in relationship to clinical dementia over 37 years in the Prospective Population Study of Women (PPSW) in Sweden. PPSW is a systematic sample of 1462 women born 1908, 1914, 1918, 1922, and 1930 and aged 38-60 years at baseline. Examinations occurred in 1968, 1974, 1980, 1992, 2000, and 2005. Statistical analyses were conducted using mixed effects regression models. Trajectories of BMI over 37 years as a function of age differed between women who did versus did not develop dementia. Women developing dementia evidenced a lesser increase in BMI from age 38 to 70 years. After age 70, the BMI slope decreased similarly (no "accelerated decline") irrespective of dementia status. A lower BMI before and during dementia onset was observed. Women with similar BMI at mid-life exhibited a different pattern of BMI change as they approached late-life that was related to dementia onset. BMI may be a potential marker of dementia-related neuropathologies in the brain. Dementia is related to a common risk factor, BMI, from mid-to late-life.
PubMed ID
21965312 View in PubMed
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Alcohol dependence and misuse in elderly suicides.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9743
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2003 May-Jun;38(3):249-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Margda Waern
Author Affiliation
Section of Psychiatry, Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg University, SE 413 45 Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2003 May-Jun;38(3):249-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Social Isolation - psychology
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS: To assess suicide risk associated with alcohol use disorder in elderly men and women, and to examine the role of social stressors in elderly suicides with and without alcohol use disorders. METHODS: This retrospective case-control study included 85 suicide cases aged 65 years and above (46 men, 39 women) and 153 randomly selected population controls (84 men, 69 women). Interviews were carried out with control persons and with informants for the suicide cases. Mental disorders were diagnosed in accordance to DSM-IV. RESULTS: A history of alcohol dependence or misuse was observed in 35% of the elderly men who died by suicide and in 18% of the women. This disorder was uncommon among persons in the control group (2% of the men and 1% of the women). Alcohol use disorder remained an independent predictor of suicide risk in the regression models for both sexes. Among suicide cases, those with alcohol use disorders were younger and less likely to be suffering from severe physical illness (35 vs 63%) than those without this disorder. CONCLUSION: Alcohol use disorder is associated with suicide in elderly men and women. Prevention programmes need to target this important subgroup.
PubMed ID
12711660 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use disorder in elderly suicide attempters: a comparison study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116972
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;21(2):196-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Johanna Morin
Stefan Wiktorsson
Thomas Marlow
Pernille J Olesen
Ingmar Skoog
Margda Waern
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. morin.johanna@gmail.com
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2013 Feb;21(2):196-203
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Depression - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Abstract
To compare lifetime prevalence of alcohol use disorder (AUD) in older adults who were hospitalized in connection with a suicide attempt and in a population comparison group, as well as to compare previous suicidal behavior in attempters with and without AUD.
Case-comparison.
Five hospitals in Western Sweden.
Persons 70 years or older, who were treated in a hospital because of a suicide attempt during 2003-2006 were recruited. Of 133 eligible participants, 103 participants were enrolled (47 men, 56 women, mean age 80 years, response rate 77%). Four comparison subjects per case were randomly selected among participants in our late-life population studies.
Lifetime history of AUD in accordance with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, was discerned on the basis of interview data, case record review, and the hospital discharge register. Depression symptoms were rated using the Montgomery-?sberg Rating Scale.
AUD was observed in 26% of the cases and in 4% of the comparison group (odds ratio [OR]: 10.5; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.9-22.5). Associations were noted in men (OR: 9.5; 95% CI: 4.0-22.8) and women (OR: 12.0; 95% CI: 2.4-59.5). More than half of the cases with AUD and?a third of those without AUD had made at least one prior suicide attempt. In these, AUD was associated with a longer interval between the first attempt and the index attempt.
A strong association between AUD and hospital-treated suicide attempts was noted in both sexes in this northern European setting. Given the high rates of suicide worldwide in this fast-growing and vulnerable group, comparison studies in other settings are needed.
PubMed ID
23343493 View in PubMed
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Antidepressants and suicidal behaviour in late life: a prospective population-based study of use patterns in new users aged 75 and above.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294436
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2018 Feb; 74(2):201-208
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
Khedidja Hedna
Karolina Andersson Sundell
Armina Hamidi
Ingmar Skoog
Sara Gustavsson
Margda Waern
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45, Gothenburg, Sweden. khedidja.hedna@neuro.gu.se.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2018 Feb; 74(2):201-208
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Male
Nootropic Agents - pharmacology
Prospective Studies
Protective factors
Risk factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate associations between antidepressant use patterns and risk of fatal and non-fatal suicidal behaviours in older adults who initiated antidepressant therapy.
A national population-based cohort study conducted among Swedish residents aged = 75 years who initiated antidepressant treatment. Patients who filled antidepressant prescriptions between January 1, 2007 and December 31, 2013 (N = 185,225) were followed until December 31, 2014. Sub-hazard ratios of suicides and suicide attempts associated with use patterns of antidepressants, adjusting for potential confounders such as serious depression were calculated using the Fine and Gray regression models.
During follow-up, 295 suicides and 654 suicide attempts occurred. Adjusted sub-hazard ratios (aSHRs) were increased for both outcomes in those who switched to another antidepressant (aSHR for suicide 2.42, 95% confidence interval 1.65 to 3.55, and for attempt 1.76, 1.32 to 2.34). Elevated suicide risks were also observed in those who concomitantly filled anxiolytics (1.54, 1.20 to 1.96) and hypnotics (2.20, 1.69 to 2.85). Similar patterns were observed for the outcome suicide attempt. Decreased risk of attempt was observed among those with concomitant use of anti-dementia drugs (0.40, 0.27 to 0.59).
Switching antidepressants, as well as concomitant use of anxiolytics or hypnotics, may constitute markers of increased risk of suicidal behaviours in those who initiate antidepressant treatment in very late life. Future research should consider indication biases and the clinical characteristics of patients initiating antidepressant therapy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29103090 View in PubMed
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Antidepressant utilization patterns and mortality in Swedish men and women aged 20-34 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100094
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Nov 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2010
Author
Karolina Andersson Sundell
Mika Gissler
Max Petzold
Margda Waern
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, PO Box 12133, 402 42, Gothenburg, Sweden, karolina.a.sundell@nhv.se.
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2010 Nov 10;
Date
Nov-10-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare antidepressant utilization patterns and mortality in relation to antidepressant use in men and women aged 20-34 years. METHODS: We used data from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register to identify adults aged 20-34 years who purchased at least one antidepressant in 2006. Information on death and migration was obtained from the Total Population Register by record linkage. One-year prevalence and proportion of new users, amount of purchased antidepressants, concurrent use of other antidepressants, mood stabilizers and antipsychotics and mortality were assessed. RESULTS: The one-year prevalence of antidepressant use was 5.6% among all Swedes aged 20-34 years (n?=?94,239) and was higher among women than men (7.2 vs. 4.0%, p?
PubMed ID
21063694 View in PubMed
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Anxiety symptoms and suicidal feelings in a population sample of 70-year-olds without dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123921
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2012 Nov;24(11):1865-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Mattias Jonson
Ingmar Skoog
Thomas Marlow
Madeleine Mellqvist Fässberg
Margda Waern
Author Affiliation
Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2012 Nov;24(11):1865-71
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cost of Illness
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Public Health Surveillance
Socioeconomic Factors
Suicidal ideation
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The role of anxiety in late-life suicidal behavior has received relatively little attention. The aim was to explore the association between anxiety symptoms and suicidal feelings in a population sample of 70-year-olds without dementia, and to test whether associations would be independent of depression.
Face-to-face interviews (N = 560) were carried out by psychiatric nurses and past month symptoms were rated with the Comprehensive Psychopathological Rating Scale (CPRS). The Brief Scale for Anxiety (BSA) was derived from the CPRS to quantify anxiety symptom burden. Past month suicidal feelings were evaluated with the Paykel questions.
Anxiety symptom burden was associated with suicidal feelings and the association remained after adjusting for major depression. One individual BSA item (Inner tension) was independently associated with suicidal feelings in a multivariate regression model. The association did not remain, however, in a final model in which depression symptoms replaced depression diagnosis.
Results from this population study suggest an association between anxiety and suicidal feelings in older adults. The role of anxiety and depression symptoms needs further clarification in the study of suicidal behavior in late life.
PubMed ID
22647285 View in PubMed
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Attempted suicide in the elderly: characteristics of suicide attempters 70 years and older and a general population comparison group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98289
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2010 Jan;18(1):57-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Stefan Wiktorsson
Bo Runeson
Ingmar Skoog
Svante Ostling
Margda Waern
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Neuropshychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Stockholm, Sweden. stefan.wiktorsson@neuro.gu.se
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2010 Jan;18(1):57-67
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Cognition
Dementia - diagnosis
Depression - diagnosis - epidemiology
Emotions
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Male
Memory
Neuropsychological Tests
Population Groups - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with attempted suicide in the elderly. DESIGN: Social, psychological, and psychiatric characteristics were compared in suicide attempters (70 years and older) and a representative population sample. SETTINGS: Emergency departments at five hospitals in western Sweden and a representative sample of the elderly population. PARTICIPANTS: Persons with Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score
PubMed ID
20094019 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure trajectories from midlife to late life in relation to dementia in women followed for 37 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127028
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):796-801
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Erik Joas
Kristoffer Bäckman
Deborah Gustafson
Svante Ostling
Margda Waern
Xinxin Guo
Ingmar Skoog
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurochemistry and Psychiatry, Neuropsychiatric Epidemiology Unit, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. erik.joas@neuro.gu.se
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):796-801
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - physiology
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Dementia - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Higher midlife blood pressure increases risk for dementia. To further understand the relation between blood pressure and dementia, it is necessary to examine evolution of blood pressure from midlife to late life. We examined blood pressure trajectories using linear mixed models in a representative sample of middle-aged women (N=1462) who were followed from 1968-1969 until 2005-2006 with comprehensive medical and neuropsychiatric examinations. Dementia was diagnosed according to established criteria. Among those not treated with antihypertensives, higher systolic blood pressure at baseline but not blood pressure trajectories from 1968 to 1992 was associated with dementia and Alzheimer disease. Those with history of antihypertensive treatment had higher baseline systolic blood pressure than those who were never treated. In this group, those who developed dementia and Alzheimer disease had lower baseline systolic blood pressure and steeper increase in systolic blood pressure from 1968 to 1992 than those who did not. A steeper decline in systolic blood pressure during the later part of the study was observed in those who developed dementia regardless of antihypertensive treatment. The latter association was attenuated or disappeared when adjusting for body mass index. The association between blood pressure and dementia is complex and influenced by antihypertensive treatment. The findings emphasize the importance of detecting increased blood pressure in midlife and controlling blood pressure in those treated. Whether the trajectory of blood pressure is a risk factor or part of the clinical course of dementia needs to be elucidated.
PubMed ID
22331381 View in PubMed
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64 records – page 1 of 7.