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Accuracy of maternal reports of pre-schoolers' weights and heights as estimates of BMI values.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163500
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Feb;36(1):132-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Lise Dubois
Manon Girad
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa, Institute at Population Health, 1 Stewart Street, Office 303, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. lise.dubois@uottawa.ca
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2007 Feb;36(1):132-8
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Male
Mothers - psychology
Obesity - epidemiology
Overweight
Population Surveillance - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Rural Health
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban health
Abstract
Data is lacking on the reliability of weight and height for young children as reported by parents participating in population-based studies. We analysed the accuracy of parental reports of children's weights and heights as estimates of body mass index, and evaluated the factors associated with the misclassification of overweight and obese children.
Analyses were conducted on a population-based birth cohort of 1549 4-year-old children from the province of Québec (Canada) in 2002. Mothers reported weights and heights for the children as part of the regular annual data collection. Within the following 3 months, children's weights and heights were measured at home as part of a nutrition survey.
This study indicates that mothers overestimate their children's weight more than their height, resulting in an overestimation of overweight children of more than 3% in the studied population. Only 58% of the children were reported as overweight/obese with reported values. Maternal misreporting is more important for boys than girls, and for low socioeconomic status children compared with high socioeconomic status children.
Research on the prevalence of overweight and obesity has often used self-reported measures of height and weight to estimate BMI. However, the results emphasize the importance of collecting measured data in childhood studies of overweight and obesity at the population level.
PubMed ID
17510077 View in PubMed
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