Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

6 records – page 1 of 1.

The 2005 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part II - therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173954
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Nadia A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Rhian M Touyz
Raj Padwal
Simon W Rabkin
Lawrence A Leiter
Marcel Lebel
Carol Herbert
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques DeChamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Norman R C Campbell
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Micharl D Hill
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Sheldon Tobe
Robyn Houlden
Ellen Burgess
Ross D Feldman
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-72
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Diet
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Patient Education as Topic
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. While changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field, and for certain comorbid conditions, other relevant outcomes, such as development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function, were considered.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2003 to October 2004 to update the 2004 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content and methodology experts. As per previous years, only studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature were included; evidence from abstracts, conference presentations and unpublished personal communications was not included.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise on four to seven days of the week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; follow a reduced fat, low cholesterol diet with an adequate intake of potassium, magnesium and calcium; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management (in selected individuals). Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and any comorbid conditions. Blood pressure should be lowered to 140/90 mmHg or less in all patients, and to 130/80 mmHg or less in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve target blood pressures. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (except in black patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers and angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or thiazides in patients with diabetes mellitus without albuminuria) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the 43 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
16003449 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part II - Therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168976
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
N A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Simon W Rabkin
Raj Padwal
Ross D Feldman
Norman Rc Campbell
Lawrence A Leiter
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Michael D Hill
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Tavis S Campbell
Carol Herbert
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Ellen Burgess
B. Hemmelgarn
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Robyn Houlden
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques Dechamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Sheldon Tobe
Rhian M Touyz
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-93
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Alcohol Drinking
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Cerebrovascular Disorders - therapy
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Diet
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - therapy
Kidney Diseases - therapy
Life Style
Magnesium - administration & dosage
Myocardial Ischemia - therapy
Patient compliance
Potassium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Sodium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized, controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. For lifestyle interventions, blood pressure (BP) lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 standard drinks per week in men or nine standard drinks per week in women; follow a diet that is reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol and that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management in selected individuals. Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and comorbid conditions. BP should be lowered to less than 140/90 mmHg in all patients, and to less than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (regardless of the degree of proteinuria). Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve these target BPs. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (in nonblack patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers or angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Jan 20;342(3):145-5310639539
Cites: Lancet. 2006 Jan 21;367(9506):209; author reply 21016427487
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: Am J Med. 2001 Nov;111(7):553-811705432
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 7;346(6):393-40311832527
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):625-4112107420
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Apr 23-30;289(16):2083-9312709466
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2003 May 12;163(9):1069-7512742805
Cites: JAMA. 2003 May 21;289(19):2534-4412759325
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2003 Jun 1;91(11):1316-2212767423
Cites: J Hypertens. 2003 Jun;21(6):1055-7612777939
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2003 Jul;14(7 Suppl 2):S99-S10212819311
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 6;362(9386):767-7113678869
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 6;362(9386):782-813678872
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Nov 13;349(20):1893-90614610160
Cites: Congest Heart Fail. 2003 Nov-Dec;9(6):324-3214688505
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-5414968142
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-914968143
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;93(2-3):105-1114975535
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 May 24;164(10):1084-9115159265
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jun 19;363(9426):2022-3115207952
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1997 Oct;10(10 Pt 1):1097-1029370379
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Oct 24;352(9137):1347-519802273
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Nov 11;351(20):2058-6815531767
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2004 Dec;82(12):935-915654408
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Mar 12-18;365(9463):939-4615766995
Cites: Stroke. 2005 Jun;36(6):1218-2615879332
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2005 Jun 27;165(12):1401-915983290
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-7216003449
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Sep 10-16;366(9489):895-90616154016
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Oct 29-Nov 4;366(9496):1545-5316257341
Cites: Pharmacotherapy. 2000 Apr;20(4):410-610772372
PubMed ID
16755313 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2007 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 2 - therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163300
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):539-50
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
May-15-2007
Author
Nadia A Khan
Brenda Hemmelgarn
Raj Padwal
Pierre Larochelle
Jeff L Mahon
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Finlay A McAlister
Simon W Rabkin
Michael D Hill
Ross D Feldman
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Norman R C Campbell
Alexander G Logan
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Tavis S Campbell
Alain Milot
James A Stone
Charlotte Jones
Lawrence A Leiter
Richard I Ogilvie
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Jacques deChamplain
George Pylypchuk
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Jean-Martin Boulanger
Luc Trudeau
Robert A Hegele
Vincent Woo
Phil McFarlane
Rhian M Touyz
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia. nakhan@shaw.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):539-50
Date
May-15-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Diet, Sodium-Restricted
Health promotion
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - prevention & control - therapy
Patient Education as Topic
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk Reduction Behavior
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the prevention and management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence was reviewed from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials. Changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest. However, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity and mortality data in this field. For treatment of patients with kidney disease, the progression of kidney dysfunction was also accepted as a clinically relevant primary outcome.
A Cochrane collaboration librarian conducted an independent MEDLINE search from 2005 to August 2006 to update the 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations. In addition, reference lists were scanned and experts were contacted to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently by both content and methodological experts using prespecified levels of evidence.
Dietary lifestyle modifications for prevention of hypertension, in addition to a well-balanced diet, include a dietary sodium intake of less than 100 mmol/day. In hypertensive patients, the dietary sodium intake should be limited to 65 mmol/day to 100 mmol/day. Other lifestyle modifications for both normotensive and hypertensive patients include: performing 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise four to seven days per week; maintaining a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm in men and less than 88 cm in women); limiting alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; following a diet reduced in saturated fat and cholesterol, and one that emphasizes fruits, vegetables and low-fat dairy products, dietary and soluble fibre, whole grains and protein from plant sources; and considering stress management in selected individuals with hypertension. For the pharmacological management of hypertension, treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and any comorbid conditions: blood pressure should be lowered to lower than 140/90 mmHg in all patients and lower than 130/80 mmHg in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most patients require more than one agent to achieve these blood pressure targets. In adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics; other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic and/or systolic hypertension include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (except in black patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers (CCBs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) or beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years of age). First-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension includes long-acting dihydropyridine CCBs or ARBs. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction, or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with cerebrovascular disease, an ACE inhibitor plus diuretic combination is preferred; in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended; and in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or ARBs (or, in patients without albuminuria, thiazides or dihydropyridine CCBs) are appropriate first-line therapies. All hypertensive patients with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents outlined in the Canadian Cardiovascular Society position statement (recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease). Selected high-risk patients with hypertension who do not achieve thresholds for statin therapy according to the position paper should nonetheless receive statin therapy. Once blood pressure is controlled, acetylsalicylic acid therapy should be considered.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Mar 13;160(5):685-9310724055
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Apr 23-30;289(16):2083-9312709466
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Jan 4;344(1):3-1011136953
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2001 May;17(5):543-5911381277
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2001 Jul 17;135(2):73-8711453706
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: Kidney Int Suppl. 2004 Nov;(92):S90-615485427
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Nov;44(5):637-4215381674
Cites: Lancet. 1990 Mar 31;335(8692):765-741969518
Cites: Hypertension. 1991 Jan;17(1 Suppl):I16-201986996
Cites: JAMA. 2003 May 21;289(19):2534-4412759325
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2003 Jun 1;91(11):1316-2212767423
Cites: J Hypertens. 2003 Jun;21(6):1055-7612777939
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2003 Jul;14(7 Suppl 2):S99-S10212819311
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):41-5414968142
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jan;20(1):55-914968143
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 May 24;164(10):1084-9115159265
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Jun 19;363(9426):2022-3115207952
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2004;(3):CD00493715266549
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1993 Jul;16(7):996-10038359108
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1996 Jan;19(1):79-898720542
Cites: Diabetes Care. 1999 Feb;22(2):307-1310333950
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2005 Jul 5;143(1):1-915998749
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-7216003449
Cites: J Hypertens. 2005 Dec;23(12):2157-7216269957
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Nov 16;294(19):2455-6416287956
Cites: J Hum Hypertens. 2005 Dec;19 Suppl 3:S10-916302005
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Jan 3;47(1):65-7116386666
Cites: Hypertension. 2006 Feb;47(2):296-30816434724
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Feb;83(2):221-616469978
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):583-9316755313
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 2006 Jun;83(6):1289-9616762939
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2006 Jun 20;144(12):884-9316785477
Cites: Am J Med. 2001 Nov;111(7):553-811705432
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Feb 7;346(6):393-40311832527
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Mar 23;359(9311):1004-1011937179
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2002 Jun;18(6):625-4112107420
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Jan 11;361(9352):117-2412531578
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Mar 1;361(9359):717-2512620735
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):603-417593584
PubMed ID
17534460 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alternative Imaging Modalities in Ischemic Heart Failure (AIMI-HF) IMAGE HF Project I-A: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108622
Source
Trials. 2013;14:218
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Eileen O'Meara
Lisa M Mielniczuk
George A Wells
Robert A deKemp
Ran Klein
Doug Coyle
Brian Mc Ardle
Ian Paterson
James A White
Malcolm Arnold
Matthias G Friedrich
Eric Larose
Alexander Dick
Benjamin Chow
Carole Dennie
Haissam Haddad
Terrence Ruddy
Heikki Ukkonen
Gerald Wisenberg
Bernard Cantin
Philippe Pibarot
Michael Freeman
Eric Turcotte
Kim Connelly
James Clarke
Kathryn Williams
Normand Racine
Linda Garrard
Jean-Claude Tardif
Jean DaSilva
Juhani Knuuti
Rob Beanlands
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Montréal, QC, Canada.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:218
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Diagnostic Imaging - methods
Heart Arrest - etiology
Heart Failure - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - therapy
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Myocardial Ischemia - complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Patient Readmission
Patient Selection
Positron-Emission Tomography
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Registries
Research Design
Time Factors
Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon
Abstract
Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the most common cause of heart failure (HF); however, the role of revascularization in these patients is still unclear. Consensus on proper use of cardiac imaging to help determine which candidates should be considered for revascularization has been hindered by the absence of clinical studies that objectively and prospectively compare the prognostic information of each test obtained using both standard and advanced imaging.
This paper describes the design and methods to be used in the Alternative Imaging Modalities in Ischemic Heart Failure (AIMI-HF) multi-center trial. The primary objective is to compare the effect of HF imaging strategies on the composite clinical endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction (MI), cardiac arrest and re-hospitalization for cardiac causes.In AIMI-HF, patients with HF of ischemic etiology (n = 1,261) will follow HF imaging strategy algorithms according to the question(s) asked by the physicians (for example, Is there ischemia and/or viability?), in agreement with local practices. Patients will be randomized to either standard (SPECT, Single photon emission computed tomography) imaging modalities for ischemia and/or viability or advanced imaging modalities: cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) or positron emission tomography (PET). In addition, eligible and consenting patients who could not be randomized, but were allocated to standard or advanced imaging based on clinical decisions, will be included in a registry.
AIMI-HF will be the largest randomized trial evaluating the role of standard and advanced imaging modalities in the management of ischemic cardiomyopathy and heart failure. This trial will complement the results of the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) viability substudy and the PET and Recovery Following Revascularization (PARR-2) trial. The results will provide policy makers with data to support (or not) further investment in and wider dissemination of alternative 'advanced' imaging technologies.
NCT01288560.
Notes
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2004 May 15;93(10):1275-915135703
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1971 Dec 23;285(26):1441-65122894
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1974 Oct 3;34(5):520-54278154
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1983 Mar 1;51(5):831-66681931
Cites: Circulation. 1983 Oct;68(4):785-956352078
Cites: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 1983 Oct;86(4):519-276604845
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1985 Jun 27;312(26):1665-713873614
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1986 Apr 3;314(14):884-83485252
Cites: Ann Surg. 1989 Sep;210(3):348-52; discussion 352-42673084
Cites: Circulation. 1990 Nov;82(5):1629-462225367
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Nov;84(5 Suppl):III290-51934422
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993 Oct;22(4):984-978409073
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1994 Mar 15;73(8):527-338147295
Cites: Circulation. 1994 Dec;90(6):2687-947994809
Cites: Circulation. 1998 Nov 10;98(19 Suppl):II51-69852880
Cites: J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2005 Feb;129(2):246-915678031
Cites: Eur J Heart Fail. 2006 Jan;8(1):63-716084759
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Jan;22(1):23-4516450016
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Feb;23(2):107-1917311116
Cites: Curr Probl Cardiol. 2007 Jul;32(7):375-41017560992
Cites: J Nucl Med. 2007 Jul;48(7):1135-4617574986
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Nov 13;50(20):2002-1217996568
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2009 Jan;2(1):34-4419356530
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2009 Sep;2(9):1060-819761983
Cites: J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):567-7420237039
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2010 Jul 15;106(2):187-9220599001
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1607-1621463150
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1671-321463151
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Apr 28;364(17):1617-2521463153
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2012 Mar;5(2):262-70; discussion 27022438424
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Mar 15;37(4):992-711263626
Cites: Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Feb;48(1):9-1410757150
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2012 Jun 5;156(11):785-95, W-270, W-271, W-272, W-273, W-274, W-275, W-276, W-277, W-27822312131
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2001 Apr;37(5):1210-311300424
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2002 Feb;39(2 Suppl 1):S1-26611904577
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Apr 3;39(7):1151-811923039
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2003 Jul 15;139(2):137-4712859163
PubMed ID
23866673 View in PubMed
Less detail

Routine versus selective cardiac magnetic resonance in non-ischemic heart failure - OUTSMART-HF: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial (IMAGE-HF (heart failure) project 1-B).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258025
Source
Trials. 2013;14:332
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ian Paterson
George A Wells
Justin A Ezekowitz
James A White
Matthias G Friedrich
Lisa M Mielniczuk
Eileen O'Meara
Benjamin Chow
Rob A DeKemp
Ran Klein
Carole Dennie
Alexander Dick
Doug Coyle
Girish Dwivedi
Miroslaw Rajda
Graham A Wright
Mika Laine
Helena Hanninen
Eric Larose
Kim A Connelly
Howard Leong-Poi
Andrew G Howarth
Ross A Davies
Lloyd Duchesne
Seppo Yla-Herttuala
Antti Saraste
Paul Farand
Linda Garrard
Jean-Claude Tardif
Malcolm Arnold
Juhani Knuuti
Rob Beanlands
Kwan L Chan
Author Affiliation
Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. ip3@ualberta.ca.
Source
Trials. 2013;14:332
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Echocardiography, Doppler
Finland
Health Care Costs
Heart Failure - diagnosis - economics - etiology - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - economics - methods
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Quality of Life
Research Design
Risk factors
Tertiary Care Centers
Time Factors
Abstract
Imaging has become a routine part of heart failure (HF) investigation. Echocardiography is a first-line test in HF given its availability and it provides valuable diagnostic and prognostic information. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is an emerging clinical tool in the management of patients with non-ischemic heart failure. Current ACC/AHA/CCS/ESC guidelines advocate its role in the detection of a variety of cardiomyopathies but there is a paucity of high quality evidence to support these recommendations.The primary objective of this study is to compare the diagnostic yield of routine cardiac magnetic resonance versus standard care (that is, echocardiography with only selective use of CMR) in patients with non-ischemic heart failure. The primary hypothesisis that the routine use of CMR will lead to a more specific diagnostic characterization of the underlying etiology of non-ischemic heart failure. This will lead to a reduction in the non-specific diagnoses of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy and HF with preserved ejection fraction.
Tertiary care sites in Canada and Finland, with dedicated HF and CMR programs, will randomize consecutive patients with new or deteriorating HF to routine CMR or selective CMR. All patients will undergo a standard clinical echocardiogram and the interpreter will assign the most likely HF etiology. Those undergoing CMR will also have a standard examination and will be assigned a HF etiology based upon the findings. The treating physician's impression about non-ischemic HF etiology will be collected following all baseline testing (including echo ± CMR). Patients will be followed annually for 4 years to ascertain clinical outcomes, quality of life and cost. The expected outcome is that the routine CMR arm will have a significantly higher rate of infiltrative, inflammatory, hypertrophic, ischemic and 'other' cardiomyopathy than the selective CMR group.
This study will be the first multicenter randomized, controlled trial evaluating the role of CMR in non-ischemic HF. Non-ischemic HF patients will be randomized to routine CMR in order to determine whether there are any gains over management strategies employing selective CMR utilization. The insight gained from this study should improve appropriate CMR use in HF.
NCT01281384.
Notes
Cites: Circ Cardiovasc Imaging. 2012 Nov;5(6):726-3323071146
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2006 Oct 3;48(7):1475-9717010819
Cites: J Magn Reson Imaging. 2001 Mar;13(3):367-7111241808
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Apr 13;342(15):1077-8410760308
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2007 Sep 11;50(11):1097-11417825724
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2007 Oct;28(20):2539-5017428822
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jan;24(1):21-4018209766
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2008 Feb;29(3):339-4718156618
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Apr 22;51(16):1581-718420102
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2008 Jun 15;101(12):1766-7118549856
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Nov 4;52(19):1574-8019007595
Cites: JAMA. 2009 Feb 25;301(8):831-4119244190
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2001 Dec;22(23):2171-911913479
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2002 Dec 18;40(12):2156-6412505229
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Jul 8;108(1):54-912821550
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Sep 6;362(9386):777-8113678871
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2004 Feb 18;43(4):642-814975476
Cites: Circulation. 2004 Mar 16;109(10):1250-814993139
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1997 Nov 15;30(6):1527-339362412
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1999 Jan;33(1):164-709935024
Cites: Circulation. 2005 Jan 18;111(2):186-9315630027
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 May 17;45(10):1683-9015893188
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2005 Jun 7;45(11):1815-2215936612
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jul;21(9):763-8016082436
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Jan;22(1):23-4516450016
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Jul 20;355(3):251-916855265
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Jul 20;355(3):260-916855266
Cites: JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2008 Mar;1(2):266-919356437
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2009 Apr 28;53(17):1475-8719389557
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Jan 19;121(2):306-1420048204
Cites: J Card Fail. 2010 Jun;16(6):e1-19420610207
Cites: Heart. 2011 Feb;97(4):287-9421193686
Cites: Circulation. 2011 Sep 20;124(12):1351-6021900085
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2011 Sep 27;58(14):1401-1321939821
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2012 Jul;33(14):1787-84722611136
Cites: J Card Fail. 2012 Aug;18(8):645-5322858081
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Nov 8;296(18):2209-1617090767
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-4517245481
Cites: J Cardiovasc Magn Reson. 2009;11:519257889
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Aug 1;114(5):397-40316864724
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2006 Oct;27(19):2338-4516963472
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2013 Mar;29(3):260-523010085
PubMed ID
24119686 View in PubMed
Less detail

Understanding palliative care on the heart failure care team: an innovative research methodology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120309
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 May;45(5):901-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Lorelei A Lingard
Allan McDougall
Valerie Schulz
Joshua Shadd
Denise Marshall
Patricia H Strachan
Glendon R Tait
J Malcolm Arnold
Gil Kimel
Author Affiliation
Centre for Education Research & Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. Lorelei.Lingard@schulich.uwo.ca
Source
J Pain Symptom Manage. 2013 May;45(5):901-11
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiology - organization & administration
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Heart Failure - nursing
Humans
Models, organizational
Ontario
Organizational Objectives
Palliative Care - organization & administration
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Research Design
Abstract
There is a growing call to integrate palliative care for patients with advanced heart failure (HF). However, the knowledge to inform integration efforts comes largely from interview and survey research with individual patients and providers. This work has been critically important in raising awareness of the need for integration, but it is insufficient to inform solutions that must be enacted not by isolated individuals but by complex care teams. Research methods are urgently required to support systematic exploration of the experiences of patients with HF, family caregivers, and health care providers as they interact as a care team.
To design a research methodology that can support systematic exploration of the experiences of patients with HF, caregivers, and health care providers as they interact as a care team.
This article describes in detail a methodology that we have piloted and are currently using in a multisite study of HF care teams.
We describe three aspects of the methodology: the theoretical framework, an innovative sampling strategy, and an iterative system of data collection and analysis that incorporates four data sources and four analytical steps.
We anticipate that this innovative methodology will support groundbreaking research in both HF care and other team settings in which palliative integration efforts are emerging for patients with advanced nonmalignant disease.
PubMed ID
23017607 View in PubMed
Less detail

6 records – page 1 of 1.