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Change in levels of persistent organic pollutants in human plasma after consumption of a traditional northern Norwegian fish dish-mølje (cod, cod liver, cod liver oil and hard roe).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71408
Source
J Environ Monit. 2003 Feb;5(1):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Torkjel M Sandanger
Magritt Brustad
Eiliv Lund
Ivan C Burkow
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute for Air Research, The Polar Environmental Centre, No-9296 Tromsø, Norway. torkjel.sandanger@nilu.no
Source
J Environ Monit. 2003 Feb;5(1):160-5
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil - chemistry
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - blood
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood
Female
Fishes
Food Contamination
Humans
Insecticides - analysis - blood
Liver - chemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - blood
Public Health
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The traditional northern Norwegian fish dish "mølje", consisting of boiled cod, cod liver, cod liver oil and hard roe, is still consumed frequently during the winter months January to March. The liver of the cod is rich in lipids and the levels of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are relatively high. To better understand the short-term consequences of this traditional meal on the plasma levels of PCBs and p,p'-DDE, individual intake of liver and cod liver oil during one meal was measured. Blood samples were collected from 33 participants before the meal, and then 4 h, 12 h and 5 days after it. Lipid-weight and wet-weight levels of 10 PCB congeners and p,p'-DDE were determined in the plasma samples and the food. The plasma levels of p,p'-DDE was found to increase significantly from 0 to 4 h, both when expressed as wet-weight (35% change) and lipid-weight (20% change). The corresponding changes (0-4 h) in wet-weight levels of the most prevalent PCB congeners were non significant. By contrast, PCB congeners with low levels in the food showed a significant drop in lipid-weight levels during the first 4 h. The observed changes were independent of amount consumed. Significant differences in fasting and non-fasting samples were found for most PCBs and p,p'-DDE. For the lipid weight levels of sum PCBs there was a significant decrease of 16% from non-fasting to fasting samples. To obtain reliable data on human levels of POPs it is, on the basis of these findings, recommended that blood samples should be collected from fasting individuals and both wet-weight and lipid-weight levels should be reported.
PubMed ID
12619772 View in PubMed
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Change in plasma levels of vitamin D after consumption of cod-liver and fresh cod-liver oil as part of the traditional north Norwegian fish dish "Mølje".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185563
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Mar;62(1):40-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Magritt Brustad
Torkjel Sandanger
Tom Wilsgaard
Lage Aksnes
Eiliv Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. magritt.brustad@ism.uit.no
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2003 Mar;62(1):40-53
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cod Liver Oil - administration & dosage
Cooking
Dietary Supplements
Female
Fishes
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Time
Vitamin D - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood
Abstract
To assess changes in plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations after ingestion of , a traditional north Norwegian fish dish rich in vitamin D.
Thirty-three volunteers all living in the city of Tromsø, located in northern Norway (latitude 690), were served a "Mølje" meal consisting of cod, hard roe, cod liver, and fresh cod-liver oil. The amounts of liver, and cod-liver oil consumed were weighed and recorded. Blood samples were collected before the meal, and at 4 hours, 12 hours and 5 days after it. The cod liver and cod-liver oil were analysed for vitamin D content and the plasma samples for the metabolite 25(OH)D. Trends in plasma 25(OH)D levels during the five-day observation period were analysed. The study was conducted at the beginning of April of 2000.
Among the 33 participating subjects, 69.7% had baseline plasma 25(OH)D concentrations below 50 nmol/l and for one-quarter of the subjects, they were
PubMed ID
12725340 View in PubMed
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Diet and lifestyle of the Sami of southern Lapland in the 1930s-1950s and today.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100980
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 May 31;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-31-2011
Author
Lena Maria Nilsson
Lars Dahlgren
Ingegerd Johansson
Magritt Brustad
Per Sjölander
Bethany Van Guelpen
Author Affiliation
Näringsforskning, Umeå universitet, SE-901 85, Umeå, Sweden. ena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 May 31;
Date
May-31-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objectives. To describe the lifestyle of the Sami of southern Lapland 50 to 70 years ago in relation to the present-day Sami and non-Sami populations and, thereby, to provide a basis for future studies of culturally related determinants of health and illness. Study design. A qualitative analysis, and a quantitative comparison of Sami and non-Sami groups. Methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 20 elderly Sami concerning their parents' lifestyle and diet 50 to 70 years ago. Questionnaire data from 81 reindeer-herding Sami, 226 non-reindeer-herding Sami and 1,842 sex-, age- and geographically matched non-Sami from the population-based Västerbotten Intervention Project were analysed by non-parametric tests and partial least squares methodology. Results. Surprisingly, fatty fish may have been more important than reindeer meat for the Sami of southern Lapland in the 1930s to 1950s, and it is still consumed more frequently by reindeer-herding Sami than nonreindeer-herding Sami and non-Sami. Other dietary characteristics of the historical Sami and present-day reindeer-herding Sami were higher intakes of fat, blood and boiled coffee, and lower intakes of bread, fibre and cultivated vegetables, compared with present-day non-Sami. Physical activity was also a part of the daily life of the Sami to a greater extent in the 1930s to 1950s than today. Sami men often worked far from home, while the women were responsible for fishing, farming, gardening (which was introduced in the 1930-1950 period), as well as housework and childcare. Conclusions. For studies investigating characteristic lifestyle elements of specific ethnic groups, the elements of greatest acknowledged cultural importance today (in this case reindeer meat) may not be of the most objective importance traditionally.
PubMed ID
21631968 View in PubMed
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Dietary predictors and plasma concentrations of perfluorinated compounds in a coastal population from northern Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145757
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2009;2009:268219
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Charlotta Rylander
Magritt Brustad
Helena Falk
Torkjel M Sandanger
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway. charlotta.rylander@uit.no
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2009;2009:268219
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Alkanesulfonic Acids - blood
Body mass index
Caprylates - blood
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Female
Fluorocarbons - blood
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Fluorinated - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Questionnaires
Seafood
Sex Distribution
Sulfonic Acids - blood
Vegetables
Water Pollutants, Chemical - blood
Abstract
Dietary intake, age, gender, and body mass index were investigated as possible predictors of perfluorinated compounds in a study population from northern Norway (44 women and 16 men). In addition to donating a blood sample, the participants answered a detailed questionnaire about diet and lifestyle. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) (29 ng/mL), perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) (3.9 ng/mL), perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) (0.5 ng/mL), perfluorononanoate (PFNA) (0.8 ng/mL), and perfluoroheptane sulfonate (PFHpS) (1.1 ng/mL) were detected in more than 95% of all samples. Of the dietary items investigated, fruit and vegetables significantly reduced the concentrations of PFOS and PFHpS, whereas fatty fish to a smaller extent significantly increased the levels of the same compounds. Men had significantly higher concentrations of PFOS, PFOA, PFHxS, and PFHpS than women. There were significant differences in PFOS isomer pattern between genders, with women having the largest proportion of linear PFOS. PFOS, PFHxS, and PFHpS concentrations also increased with age.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20111729 View in PubMed
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Disordered eating in Sami and non-Sami Norwegian populations: the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298375
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 04; 21(6):1094-1105
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-2018
Author
Kirsti Kvaløy
Marita Melhus
Anne Silviken
Magritt Brustad
Tore Sørlie
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Author Affiliation
1Centre for Sami Health Research,Department of Community Medicine,UiT The Arctic University of Norway,9037 Tromsø,Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 04; 21(6):1094-1105
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Exercise
Feeding and Eating Disorders - epidemiology
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The present study aimed to investigate disordered eating (DE) among Sami compared with non-Sami residing in northern Norway.
In a cross-sectional design, stratified by sex and ethnicity, associations were tested between DE (Eating Disturbance Scale; EDS-5) and age, education level, BMI category, anxiety and depression, physical activity and consumption of snacks.
The SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014) based on the population of ten municipalities in northern Norway.
Adults aged 40-69 years; 1811 Sami (844 male, 967 female) compared with 2578 non-Sami (1180 male, 1398 female) individuals.
No overall significant ethnic difference in DE was identified, although comfort eating was reported more often by Sami individuals (P=0·01). Regardless of ethnicity and sex, symptoms of anxiety and depression were associated with DE (P
PubMed ID
29223188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Disordered eating in Sami and non-Sami Norwegian populations: the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287602
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec 10;:1-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-2017
Author
Kirsti Kvaløy
Marita Melhus
Anne Silviken
Magritt Brustad
Tore Sørlie
Ann Ragnhild Broderstad
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Dec 10;:1-12
Date
Dec-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The present study aimed to investigate disordered eating (DE) among Sami compared with non-Sami residing in northern Norway.
In a cross-sectional design, stratified by sex and ethnicity, associations were tested between DE (Eating Disturbance Scale; EDS-5) and age, education level, BMI category, anxiety and depression, physical activity and consumption of snacks.
The SAMINOR 2 Clinical Survey (2012-2014) based on the population of ten municipalities in northern Norway.
Adults aged 40-69 years; 1811 Sami (844 male, 967 female) compared with 2578 non-Sami (1180 male, 1398 female) individuals.
No overall significant ethnic difference in DE was identified, although comfort eating was reported more often by Sami individuals (P=0·01). Regardless of ethnicity and sex, symptoms of anxiety and depression were associated with DE (P
PubMed ID
29223188 View in PubMed
Less detail

Duration of vitamin D synthesis from weather model data for use in prospective epidemiological studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150953
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2009 Sep;53(5):451-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Kåre Edvardsen
Ola Engelsen
Magritt Brustad
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tromsø, 9037, Tromsø, Norway. ked@nilu.no
Source
Int J Biometeorol. 2009 Sep;53(5):451-9
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemiologic Studies
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Seasons
Skin - metabolism - radiation effects
Skin Neoplasms - metabolism - pathology
Software
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - biosynthesis - blood - radiation effects
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology - prevention & control
Weather
Abstract
In order to investigate the influence of solar radiation on vitamin D status and its association with different health outcomes in population based studies, appropriate estimates of the subjects' UV radiation exposure are needed. This unique study describes a method that estimates the daily number of vitamin D effective hours (VD-hours) at arbitrary ground locations throughout the period 1957-2002. The method is particularly suited for large-scale prospective epidemiological studies with questionnaire-based information on sun exposure, and where blood measures of vitamin D status are not available. The model takes total cloud cover fraction and total ozone column at noon as input from the ERA-40 data series (i.e. the 40 + year European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis archive). By comparing the model results against high accuracy measurements at two different locations in Norway, we found the method for estimating the number of VD-hours to be accurate within 2.5 +/- 7% or better for moderate solar zenith angles ( 65 degrees) the results are more variable, but the contribution to a population's vitamin D level from solar radiation when the sun is this low in the sky is rather small. The program code to compute VD-hours from ERA-40 files is written in Perl (v 5.8.7) and may be obtained free of charge by contacting corresponding author.
PubMed ID
19444487 View in PubMed
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The effect of coffee consumption on serum total cholesterol in the Sami and Norwegian populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97573
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Mar 26;:1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-26-2010
Author
Tove Nystad
Marita Melhus
Magritt Brustad
Eiliv Lund
Author Affiliation
Centre for Sami Health Research, Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2010 Mar 26;:1-8
Date
Mar-26-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess coffee consumption in the Sami and Norwegian populations and to investigate the impact of unfiltered boiled coffee consumption on serum cholesterol concentrations. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. Information was collected by self-administrated questionnaires and total serum cholesterol was analysed. Participants were divided into three ethnic groups: Sami I (Sami used as home language in the last three generations), Sami II (at least one Sami identity marker) and Norwegian. SETTING: In an area with Sami, Kven/Finnish and Norwegian populations, the SAMINOR study, 2003-2004. SUBJECTS: A total of 5647 men and 6347 women aged 36-79 years. RESULTS: More than 90 % of the study populations were coffee drinkers. Only 22 % were unfiltered coffee consumers. Sami I had the highest proportion of participants who consumed nine or more cups of unfiltered coffee per day, although the number of participants was limited. Total coffee consumption was associated with increased total cholesterol for men (P
PubMed ID
20338083 View in PubMed
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Exposure to per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances through the consumption of fish from lakes affected by aqueous film-forming foam emissions - A combined epidemiological and exposure modeling approach. The SAMINOR 2 Clinical Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289315
Source
Environ Int. 2016 09; 94:272-282
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2016
Author
Solrunn Hansen
Robin Vestergren
Dorte Herzke
Marita Melhus
Anita Evenset
Linda Hanssen
Magritt Brustad
Torkjel M Sandanger
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, P.O. Box 6050, Langnes, NO-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: solrunn.hansen@uit.no.
Source
Environ Int. 2016 09; 94:272-282
Date
09-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Airports
Alkanesulfonic Acids - analysis - blood
Animals
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Female
Fishes
Fluorocarbons - analysis - blood
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Lakes
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Biological
Norway
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - blood
Abstract
Releases of aqueous film-forming foams (AFFFs) from airport firefighting activities have been identified as important local point sources of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in nearby waterways. PFASs can be taken up by fish, and in turn by the humans that consume them. Despite the global extent of AFFF emissions, few studies exist on related impacts on humans. We aimed to investigate the associations between the consumption of fish from AFFF-affected waters and serum PFAS concentrations in humans using a combination of statistical tools, empirical data, and toxicokinetic modeling. Participants of the SAMINOR 2 Clinical Study were the basis for this study sample, which comprised 74 persons. Fifty-nine participants who reported consuming fish from AFFF-affected waters and 15 nonconsumers completed a questionnaire and gave serum samples. Participants were classified based on their consumption of trout and char: high (n=16), moderate (n=16), low (n=27), and nonconsumers (n=15); and serum samples were tested for the presence of 15 PFASs. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) was found in all participants, with the highest concentrations detected in the high consumption group (geometric means, 28ng/mL) compared to the low consumption group and nonconsumers (10 and 11ng/mL, respectively). In an analysis of variance contrast model, a significant, positive increasing trend was seen for fish consumption and PFOS, perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA). Toxicokinetic modeling allowed us to predict the median increases in serum concentrations of PFOS, PFHxS, and PFNA among high consumers within a factor of 2.2. The combination of statistical evaluation and toxicokinetic modeling clearly demonstrated a positive relationship between consumption of fish from AFFF-affected waters and serum PFAS concentrations. Further studies on dietary exposure to other PFASs present in AFFF and its consequences on human health are warranted.
PubMed ID
27286038 View in PubMed
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Fish consumption and socio-economic factors among residents of Arkhangelsk city and the rural Nenets autonomous area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136953
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Feb;70(1):46-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Natalia Petrenya
Liliya Dobrodeeva
Magritt Brustad
Fatima Bichkaeva
Elena Menshikova
Gulnara Lutfalieva
Anna Poletaeva
Veronika Repina
Marie Cooper
Jon Øyvind Odland
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Food, Fisheries and Aquaculture Research (Nofima), N-9291 Tromsø, Norway. natalya.petrenya@nofima.no
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Feb;70(1):46-58
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Cross-Sectional Studies
Energy Intake - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Fishes
Food Preferences - ethnology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Siberia
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The urban Russian and the rural Indigenous populations in the Russian European North have different lifestyles, living conditions and food supplies. The objective of this study was to investigate and compare fish consumption in relation to the socio-economic characteristics of 2 communities in Arkhangelsk County.
A cross-sectional study.
In total, 166 adults (83.1% women) from Arkhangelsk city and 134 adults (80.6% women) from the village of Nelmin-Nos (of which 88.9% are Indigenous people, Nenets), in the Nenets Autonomous Area (NAO), attended a health screening. The screening included a physical examination, blood sampling and a questionnaire.
The populations studied had different socio-economic characteristics. In the rural NAO group, education levels were lower, the number of full-time employees was less, the percentage of persons with low monthly income was higher and the number of children per household was higher when compared to the Arkhangelsk group. The median total fish intake was 48.8 g/day for Arkhangelsk city and 27.1 g/day for Nelmin-Nos (p=0.009). Locally caught whitefish constituted a major part of the total fish consumption in Nelmin-Nos, while lean marine fish species were rarely eaten. Cod and cod-family fish species were often consumed by residents of Arkhangelsk city (p
PubMed ID
21329575 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.