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The mode of school transportation in pre-pubertal children does not influence the accrual of bone mineral or the gain in bone size--two year prospective data from the paediatric osteoporosis preventive (POP) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98172
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Bjarne Löfgren
Susanna Stenevi-Lundgren
Magnus Dencker
Magnus K Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Department of Orthopaedics Malmö University Hospital, SE- 20502 Malmö, Sweden. bjarne.lofgren@med.lu.se
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2010;11:25
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Bone Density
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Motor Activity
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schools
Sweden - epidemiology
Transportation - statistics & numerical data
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Walking and cycling to school are one source of regular physical activity. The aim of this two years observational study in pre-pubertal children was to evaluate if walking and cycling to school was associated with higher total amount of physical activity and larger gain in bone mineral content (BMC) and bone width than when going by car or bus. METHODS: 133 boys and 99 girls aged 7-9 years were recruited to the Malmö Prospective Paediatric Osteoporosis Prevention (POP) study. BMC (g) was measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in total body, lumbar spine (L2-L4) and femoral neck (FN) at baseline and after 24 months. Bone width was measured in L2-L4 and FN. Skeletal changes in the 57 boys and 48 girls who consistently walked or cycled to school were compared with the 24 boys and 17 girls who consistently went by bus or car. All children remained in Tanner stage I. Level of everyday physical activity was estimated by accelerometers worn for four consecutive days and questionnaires. Comparisons were made by independent student's t-tests between means and Fisher's exact tests. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to adjust for group differences in age at baseline, duration of organized physical activity, annual changes in length and BMC or bone width if there were differences in these traits at baseline. RESULTS: After the adjustments, there were no differences in the annual changes in BMC or bone width when comparing girls or boys who walked or cycled to school with those who went by car or bus. Furthermore, there were no differences in the levels of everyday physical activity objectively measured by accelerometers and all children reached above the by the United Kingdom Expert Consensus Group recommended level of 60 minutes moderate to vigorous physical activity per day. CONCLUSION: A physical active transportation to school for two years is in pre-pubertal children not associated with a higher accrual of BMC or bone width than a passive mode of transportation, possibly due to the fact that the everyday physical activity in these pre-pubertal children, independent of the mode of school transportation, was high.
PubMed ID
20128900 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular predictors for long-term mortality after EVAR for AAA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129228
Source
Vasc Med. 2011 Dec;16(6):422-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Tomas Ohrlander
Magnus Dencker
Nuno V Dias
Anders Gottsäter
Stefan Acosta
Author Affiliation
Eksjö County Hospital, Eksjö, Sweden.
Source
Vasc Med. 2011 Dec;16(6):422-7
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anemia - mortality
Aorta, Abdominal - pathology
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - diagnosis - mortality - surgery
Comorbidity
Echocardiography
Electrocardiography
Endovascular Procedures - mortality
Female
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - mortality
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - diagnosis - mortality
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stents
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess cardiovascular predictors for all-cause long-term mortality in patients undergoing standard endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) for infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Consecutive patients treated with EVAR (Zenith(®) stent grafts; Cook) between May 1998 and February 2006 were prospectively enrolled in a computerized database, together with retrospectively collected data on medication, and electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables. Mortality was assessed on 1 December 2010. The median follow-up time was 68 months and the median age was 74 years (range 53-89) for the 304 patients. Mortality at the end of follow-up was 54.3% (165/304). The proportion of deaths caused by vascular diseases was 61% (101/165). In the univariate analysis, low preoperative ejection fraction (EF) (p = 0.004), absence of statin medication (p = 0.007), and medication with diuretics (p = 0.028) or digitalis (p = 0.016) were associated with an increased long-term mortality rate. Myocardial ischemia on electrocardiogram (ECG) (hazard ratio (HR) 1.6 [95% CI 1.1-2.4]) and anemia (HR 1.5 [95% CI 1.0-2.1]) were found to be independent predictors for long-term mortality after Cox regression analysis. There was a trend that chronic kidney disease, stage = 3 (HR 1.5 [95% CI 1.0-2.2]), and age 80 years and above (HR 1.5 [95% CI 1.0-2.4]) were independently associated with long-term mortality. In conclusion, ischemia on ECG and anemia were independently related to an increased long-term mortality rate after EVAR, and these predictive factors seem to be most important for critical assessment in the preoperative medical work-up.
PubMed ID
22128041 View in PubMed
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Daily physical activity and sports participation among children from ethnic minorities in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113846
Source
Eur J Sport Sci. 2013;13(3):321-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Glen Nielsen
Bianca Hermansen
Anna Bugge
Magnus Dencker
Lars Bo Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Nørre Alle, Denmark. gnielsen@ifi.ku.dk
Source
Eur J Sport Sci. 2013;13(3):321-31
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Child
Child Welfare - ethnology
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Ethnic Groups - classification - statistics & numerical data
Exercise
Humans
Logistic Models
Physical Fitness
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Resource Allocation - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Social Participation
Sports - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate whether Danish children from immigrant backgrounds are less physically active than children from the ethnic majority, and to investigate the possible reasons for any differences found. Accelerometer measures of physical activity as well as questionnaire data about organised sports, family demography, resources and values were collected from 594 children of whom 67 had other ethnic background than Danish. Data were collected when the children were 6-7 years old and again later when the children were 9-10 years old. It was found that children from immigrant backgrounds were not less physically active than other children when their amounts of daily physical activity were measured by direct objective measures, despite their participation rate in organised sports being much lower. Using multiple logistic regression modelling, this study showed that lack of parental experience with organised sports and lack of economic/material resources explained much of the difference in sports participation. Children of immigrant background had significant lower participation in club sports but this did not affect their overall physical activity level.
PubMed ID
23679149 View in PubMed
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Atherosclerotic plaques in the internal carotid artery and associations with lung function assessed by different methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127425
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Mar;32(2):120-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Sophia Frantz
Ulf Nihlén
Magnus Dencker
Gunnar Engström
Claes-Göran Löfdahl
Per Wollmer
Author Affiliation
Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. sophia.frantz@med.lu.se
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Mar;32(2):120-5
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery, Internal - ultrasonography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Plaque, Atherosclerotic - epidemiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Plethysmography, Whole Body
Predictive value of tests
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Function Tests
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology
Spirometry
Sweden - epidemiology
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Previous studies on associations between reduced lung function and cardiovascular disease (CVD) have mainly been based on forced expiratory volume in 1-s (FEV(1) ) and vital capacity (VC). This study examined potential associations between five different lung function variables and plaques in the internal carotid artery (ICA).
Subjects (n = 450) from a previous population-based respiratory questionnaire survey [current smokers without lower respiratory symptoms, subjects with a self-reported diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and never-smokers without lower respiratory symptoms] were examined using spirometry, body plethysmography and measurements of diffusing capacity for CO (D(L,CO) ). Plaques in the ICA were assessed by ultrasonography.
Two hundred and twenty subjects were current smokers, 139 ex-smokers and 89 never-smokers. COPD was diagnosed in 130 subjects (GOLD criteria). Plaques in the ICA were present in 231 subjects (52%). General linear analysis with adjustment for established risk factors for atherosclerosis, including C-reactive protein, showed that D(L,CO) was lower [77.4% versus 83.7% of predicted normal (PN), P = 0.014] and residual volume (RV) was higher (110.3% versus 104.8% of PN, P = 0.020) in subjects with than without plaques in the ICA. This analysis did not show any statistically significant association between plaques and FEV(1) or VC.
The occurrence of plaques in the ICA was associated with low D(L,CO) and high RV, but not significantly with FEV(1) or COPD status. The results suggest that the relationships between reduced lung function, COPD and CVD are complex and not only linked to bronchial obstruction and low-grade systemic inflammation.
PubMed ID
22296632 View in PubMed
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Body fat, abdominal fat, and body fat distribution is related to left atrial diameter in young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132429
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 May;20(5):1104-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Magnus Dencker
Ola Thorsson
Magnus K Karlsson
Christian Lindén
Lars B Andersen
Per Wollmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Unit of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. magnus.dencker@skane.se
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 May;20(5):1104-8
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - pathology - radiography
Absorptiometry, Photon
Body Composition
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Child
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography
Female
Heart Atria - pathology - radiography
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology - radiography
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In adults, the size of the left atria (LA) has important prognostic information. In obese adults, adolescents and children enlargement of LA have been observed. This has not been investigated on a population-based level in young children. We therefore assessed if total body fat mass (TBF), abdominal fat, and body fat distribution were related to LA diameter. Cross-sectional study of 244 children (boys = 137 and girls n = 107) aged 8-11 years, recruited from an urban population-based cohort. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measured total lean body mass, TBF, and abdominal fat mass (AFM). Body fat was also calculated as a percentage of body mass (BF%). Body fat distribution (AFM/TBF) was calculated. Echocardiography was performed with two-dimensional guided M-mode. LA diameter was measured and left ventricular mass (LVM) was calculated. Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were measured and maturity assessed according to Tanner. There were significant (P
PubMed ID
21818147 View in PubMed
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Body fat, abdominal fat and body fat distribution related to VO(2PEAK) in young children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138982
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e597-602
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Magnus Dencker
Per Wollmer
Magnus K Karlsson
Christian Lindén
Lars B Andersen
Ola Thorsson
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. magnus.dencker@skane.se
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e597-602
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - physiopathology - radiography
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adiposity
Age Factors
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Calorimetry, Indirect
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Overweight - physiopathology - prevention & control - radiography
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Aerobic fitness, defined as maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2PEAK)), and body fat measurements represent two known risk factors for disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between VO(2PEAK) and body fat measurements in young children at a population-based level.
Cross-sectional study of 225 children (128 boys and 97 girls) aged 8-11 years, recruited from a population-based cohort. Total lean body mass (LBM), total fat mass (TBF), and abdominal fat mass (AFM) were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Body fat was also calculated as a percentage of body mass (BF%) and body fat distribution as AFM/TBF. VO(2PEAK) was assessed by indirect calorimetry during maximal exercise test.
Significant relationships existed between body fat measurements and VO(2PEAK) in both boys and girls, with Pearson correlation coefficients for absolute values of VO(2PEAK) (0.22-0.36, P
PubMed ID
21118017 View in PubMed
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Influence of a 3-year exercise intervention program on fracture risk, bone mass, and bone size in prepubertal children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136426
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2011 Aug;26(8):1740-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Bjarne Löfgren
Fredrik Detter
Magnus Dencker
Susanna Stenevi-Lundgren
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Magnus K Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, Department of Orthopaedics, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. bjarne.lofgren@med.lu.se
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2011 Aug;26(8):1740-7
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Density - physiology
Bone and Bones - pathology - physiopathology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Exercise
Female
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Hip - pathology - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Life Style
Male
Organ Size
Puberty - physiology
Risk factors
Spine - pathology - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Published prospective pediatric exercise intervention studies are short term and use skeletal traits as surrogate endpoints for fractures, whereas other reports infer exercise to be associated with more trauma and fractures. This prospective, controlled exercise intervention study therefore followed both skeletal traits and fracture risk for 36 months. Fractures were registered in children aged 7 to 9 years; there were 446 boys and 362 girls in the intervention group (2129 person-years) and 807 boys and 780 girls in the control group (4430 person-years). The intervention included school physical education of 40 minutes per day for 3 years. The control children achieved the Swedish standard of 60 minutes per week. In a subsample of 76 boys and 48 girls in the intervention group and 55 boys and 44 girls in the control group, bone mineral content (BMC, g) and bone width (cm) were followed in the lumbar spine and hip by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The rate ratio (RR) for fractures was 1.08 (0.71, 1.62) [mean (95% confidence interval)]. In the DXA-measured children, there were no group differences at baseline in age, anthropometrics, or bone traits. The mean annual gain in the intervention group in lumbar spine BMC was 0.9 SD higher in girls and 0.8 SD higher in boys (both p
PubMed ID
21381112 View in PubMed
Less detail

Echocardiographic consequences of smoking status in middle-aged subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284166
Source
Echocardiography. 2017 Jan;34(1):14-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Morten Kraen
Sophia Frantz
Ulf Nihlén
Gunnar Engström
Claes-Göran Löfdahl
Per Wollmer
Magnus Dencker
Source
Echocardiography. 2017 Jan;34(1):14-19
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiac Output - physiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography - methods
Female
Heart Ventricles - diagnostic imaging - physiopathology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Smoking is known to have many short- and long-term cardiovascular effects. Cardiac index (CI), which is cardiac output indexed to body surface area, is considered to be a valid measure of cardiac performance. We investigated whether there were any differences in CI or other echocardiographic variables between never smokers, ex-smokers, and current smokers in a cardiopulmonary healthy population.
Subjects (n=355) from a previous population-based respiratory questionnaire survey (never smokers, ex-smokers, and current smokers without significant chronic obstructive lung disease) were examined with echocardiography, and CI (L/min/m(2) ) was calculated.
Current smokers had a higher CI than never smokers 2.61±0.52 L/min/m(2) vs. 2.42±0.49 L/min/m(2) (P.05). Smoking status had no significant effect on other echocardiographic variables.
We conclude that currents smokers without known cardiac disease or significant chronic obstructive lung disease show signs of slightly altered hemodynamics.
PubMed ID
27681781 View in PubMed
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A 6-year exercise program improves skeletal traits without affecting fracture risk: a prospective controlled study in 2621 children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259943
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Jun;29(6):1325-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Fredrik Detter
Björn E Rosengren
Magnus Dencker
Mattias Lorentzon
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Magnus K Karlsson
Source
J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Jun;29(6):1325-36
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Accelerometry
Bone Density
Bone and Bones - pathology - physiopathology - radiography
Case-Control Studies
Child
Exercise - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - epidemiology - physiopathology - radiography
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Motor Activity
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Most pediatric exercise intervention studies that evaluate the effect on skeletal traits include volunteers and follow bone mass for less than 3 years. We present a population-based 6-year controlled exercise intervention study in children with bone structure and incident fractures as endpoints. Fractures were registered in 417 girls and 500 boys in the intervention group (3969 person-years) and 835 girls and 869 boys in the control group (8245 person-years), all aged 6 to 9 years at study start, during the 6-year study period. Children in the intervention group had 40 minutes daily school physical education (PE) and the control group 60 minutes per week. In a subcohort with 78 girls and 111 boys in the intervention group and 52 girls and 54 boys in the control group, bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm(2) ) and bone area (mm(2) ) were measured repeatedly by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) measured bone mass and bone structure at follow-up. There were 21.7 low and moderate energy-related fractures per 1000 person-years in the intervention group and 19.3 fractures in the control group, leading to a rate ratio (RR) of 1.12 (0.85, 1.46). Girls in the intervention group, compared with girls in the control group, had 0.009?g/cm(2) (0.003, 0.015) larger gain annually in spine BMD, 0.07?g (0.014, 0.123) larger gain in femoral neck bone mineral content (BMC), and 4.1?mm(2) (0.5, 7.8) larger gain in femoral neck area, and at follow-up 24.1?g (7.6, 40.6) higher tibial cortical BMC (g) and 23.9?mm(2) (5.27, 42.6) larger tibial cross-sectional area. Boys with daily PE had 0.006?g/cm(2) (0.002, 0.010) larger gain annually in spine BMD than control boys but at follow-up no higher pQCT values than boys in the control group. Daily PE for 6 years in at study start 6- to 9-year-olds improves bone mass and bone size in girls and bone mass in boys, without affecting the fracture risk.
Notes
Comment In: J Bone Miner Res. 2014 Jun;29(6):1322-424764102
PubMed ID
24390777 View in PubMed
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Lack of physical activity in young children is related to higher composite risk factor score for cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136808
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 May;100(5):717-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Tina Tanha
Per Wollmer
Ola Thorsson
Magnus K Karlsson
Christian Lindén
Lars B Andersen
Magnus Dencker
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Unit of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. tina.tanha@skane.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2011 May;100(5):717-21
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acceleration
Body Composition
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Motor Activity - physiology
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
This study evaluates whether accelerometer-measured physical activity is related to higher composite risk factor scores for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in children.
Cross-sectional study that included 223 children aged 7.9-11.1 years (boys n = 123, girls n = 100). Daily physical activity was assessed by accelerometers for 4 days. Body fat was quantified by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Maximal oxygen uptake was measured during a maximal exercise test. Resting heart rate and blood pressure were measured. Z-scores [(value for the individual - mean value for group)/SD] were calculated for each variable, and the sum of different risk factor z-scores used as an index of composite risk factors score for CVD.
Partial correlations, from General Linear Model, between moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), vigorous physical activity (VPA) and general physical activity versus index of composite risk factor score were in boys 0.29, 0.33 and 0.30 (all p
PubMed ID
21342249 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.