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Addressing the realities [correction of realties] of health care in northern aboriginal communities through participatory action research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175481
Source
J Interprof Care. 2004 Nov;18(4):360-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Bruce Minore
Margaret Boone
Mae Katt
Peggy Kinch
Stephen Birch
Author Affiliation
Center for Rural and Northern Health Research, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. bruce.minore@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2004 Nov;18(4):360-8
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Community Health Services - economics - supply & distribution
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - economics - organization & administration
Diabetes Mellitus - ethnology - therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Mental Health Services - supply & distribution
Neoplasms - ethnology - therapy
Rural Health Services - economics - supply & distribution
Abstract
To address concerns about disruptions in the continuity of health care delivered to residents in three remote aboriginal communities in northern Ontario, Canada, the local health authority initiated a study in collaboration with the department of Health Canada responsible for ensuring that aboriginal reserves receive mandatory health services, and an inter-disciplinary team of researchers from two universities. The study focussed on the delivery of oncology, diabetes and mental health care, specifically, as well as systems issues such as recruitment and retention of health human resources and financial costs. The paper discusses the procedures involved, the benefits derived and the challenges encountered in doing this as a community driven participatory action research project. It also summarizes the findings that led to community formulated policy and program recommendations.
PubMed ID
15801551 View in PubMed
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The effects of nursing turnover on continuity of care in isolated First Nation communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174830
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Mar;37(1):86-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Bruce Minore
Margaret Boone
Mae Katt
Peggy Kinch
Stephen Birch
Christopher Mushquash
Author Affiliation
Centre for Rural and Northern Health Research, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Mar;37(1):86-100
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Community Health Nursing - manpower
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Diabetes Mellitus - nursing
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Indians, North American
Interprofessional Relations
Medically underserved area
Mental Disorders - nursing
Neoplasms - nursing
Nurse's Role
Nursing Administration Research
Nursing Audit
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology - supply & distribution
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Quality of Health Care - standards
Questionnaires
Abstract
Many of Canada's northern First Nation communities experience difficulty recruiting and retaining appropriate nursing staff and must rely on relief nurses for short-term coverage. The latter often are not adequately prepared for the demanding nature of the practice. This study examined the consequences of nursing turnover on the continuity of care provided to residents of three Ojibway communities in northern Ontario. The findings are based on a review of 135 charts of oncology, diabetes, and mental health clients, and on interviews with 30 professional and paraprofessional health-care providers who served the communities. Nursing turnover is shown to detrimentally affect communications, medications management, and the range of services offered; it also results in compromised follow-up, client disengagement, illness exacerbation, and an added burden of care for family and community members.
Notes
Erratum In: Can J Nurs Res. 2005 Jun;37(2):2
PubMed ID
15887767 View in PubMed
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From health care to home community: an Aboriginal community-based ABI transition strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138013
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Michelle Keightley
Victoria Kendall
Shu-Hyun Jang
Cindy Parker
Sabrina Agnihotri
Angela Colantonio
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Claudine Longboat-White
Alice Bellavance
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2011;25(2):142-52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Brain Injuries - ethnology - rehabilitation
Community Health Services - standards
Continuity of Patient Care - standards
Female
Focus Groups
Health Services Accessibility
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Ontario
Patient Discharge
Prospective Studies
Qualitative Research
Self Report
Abstract
To explore the barriers and enablers surrounding the transition from health care to home community settings for Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injuries (ABI) in northwestern Ontario.
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Focus groups conducted with clients with ABI, their caregivers and hospital and community health-care workers. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Six main categories emerged: ABI diagnosis accuracy, acute service delivery and hospital care, transition from hospital to homecare services, transition from hospital to community services, participant suggestions to improve service delivery and transition, and views on traditional healing methods during recovery.
A lack of awareness, education and resources were acknowledged as key challenges to successful transitioning by clients and healthcare providers. Geographical isolation of the communities was highlighted as a barrier to accessibility of services and programmes, but the community was also regarded as an important source of social support. The development of educational and screening tools and needs assessments of remote communities were identified to be strategies that may improve transitions.
Findings demonstrate that the structure of rehabilitation and discharge processes for Aboriginal clients living on reserves or in remote communities are of great concern and warrants further research.
PubMed ID
21219087 View in PubMed
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Planning without facts: Ontario's Aboriginal health information challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151019
Source
J Agromedicine. 2009;14(2):90-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Mary Ellen Hill
Author Affiliation
Centre for Rural and Northern Health Research, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. bruce.minore@lakeheadu.ca
Source
J Agromedicine. 2009;14(2):90-6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Censuses
Data Collection
Health Services Needs and Demand - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Interviews as Topic
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Registries
Rural health services - organization & administration
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The majority of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit people living in the Canadian province of Ontario have less access to quality health care than the population as a whole. Yet improving the situation is hampered by the lack of an information system that documents fundamental facts about Aboriginal people's health status and services utilization. Without a means to collect such data, these knowledge deficits will persist, making the planning and provision of culturally appropriate services impossible. The Ontario Health Quality Council commissioned a study to (1) review data collection systems in other Canadian jurisdictions and (2) determine what Ontario needs in order to have a comprehensive Aboriginal health information system. The study involved a review of 177 policy and technical documents and interviews with 20 key informants in Ontario, as well as Canada's other provinces and territories. Results showed that the capacity to document Aboriginal peoples' health and service utilization varies significantly, depending on existing provincial/territorial health data sets and the ability to cross-link health data using unique identifiers. Some jurisdictions can locate Aboriginal data using health cards, health benefits payment information, or vital statistics identifiers; others rely on linkages using federal or provincial Aboriginal registry and membership lists. All have the capability to conduct geographical analyses to identify health and service utilization for communities or regions that have significant Aboriginal populations. To improve health information in Ontario, Aboriginal people's collective entitlements to information about their communities must be recognized. The authors outline implications of a set of principles that Canada's First Nations have adopted, commonly referred to as OCAP (Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession), on the collection, storage, use, and interpretation of health data. Only through negotiation with Aboriginal peoples can health information systems be established that meet their needs, as well as those of decision-makers and care providers.
PubMed ID
19437263 View in PubMed
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Rehabilitation challenges for Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury: a qualitative study engaging health care practitioners.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152713
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Michelle L Keightley
Ruwan Ratnayake
Bruce Minore
Mae Katt
Anita Cameron
Randy White
Alice Bellavance
Claudine Longboat-White
Angela Colantonio
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. michelle.keightley@utoronto.ca
Source
Brain Inj. 2009 Mar;23(3):250-61
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Brain Injuries - epidemiology - ethnology - rehabilitation
Continuity of Patient Care
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - standards
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Qualitative Research
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the experiences of health care practitioners working with Aboriginal clients recovering from acquired brain injury (ABI).
Participatory research design using qualitative methods.
Fourteen in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted. The Framework Method of analysis was used to uncover emerging themes.
Five main categories emerged: practitioners' experience with brain injury, practitioners' experience with Aboriginal clients, specialized needs of Aboriginal clients recovering from brain injury, culturally sensitive care and traditional healing methods. These categories were then further divided into emergent themes and sub-themes where applicable, with particular emphasis on the specialized needs of Aboriginal clients.
Each emergent theme highlighted key challenges experienced by Aboriginal peoples recovering from ABI. A key challenge was that protocols for rehabilitation and discharge planning are often lacking for clients living on reserves or in remote communities. Other challenges included lack of social support; difficulty of travel and socio-cultural factors associated with post-acute care; and concurrent disorders.
Results suggest that developing reasonable protocols for discharge planning of Aboriginal clients living on reserves and/or remote communities should be considered a priority.
PubMed ID
19205962 View in PubMed
Less detail